Update Your "Personal Page" at FTDNA

Stage 2--Updating your Personal Page gives you control of your test results.

     

When the lab finishes processing the sample and your results are returned to you, you will be notified by email.   You will then have more options, and will be able to adjust your preferences, such as determining how to compare your results.  The choices you make will have an impact on the success of your DNA testing, so take time to update your choices.

Now that you have full control of your test results, you want to be sure to use all the tools provided to you by FTDNA. 

(If you have not yet received your test results, you will be in
Stage 1 Access Your Personal Page.)

Use your kit number and your FTDNA-provided password to log in at www.familytreedna.com for your “personal page”.

To see an example of a Personal Page at FTDNA, click here.)

      Stage 2 -- Update your Personal Page

Here are some tips for using the links you will see in the left column of your Personal Page:

  • My Project Groups (left column)--shows all the groups you have joined.  By clicking on the project name, you will go directly to the project website.
    • Join Projects--
      • FTDNA allows you to join several projects--as many surname projects as you feel are appropriate, a yDNA haplogroup project, a mtDNA haplogroup project, and geographic projects.
      • Search for your project on the FTDNA "Join A Group" page, and click the links to go to the project page.
      • You will find a link to the project's website
      • You will see a link in the lower right corner labeled "Join".  Click this to join the project
      • The project name will appear in the left column of your personal page under "My Project Groups"
    • myFTDNA Home - This link always returns you to your personal page.
    • myFTDNA Forum - Link to the various forums available at FTDNA
  • My Account
    • Contact Information--
      • Change or update your email address, or add another email address
      • Add the Paternal and Maternal Country of Origin.  "Maternal "does not mean your Most Distant Known Paternal Ancestor's wife.  It means your mother's mother's mother's ..........mother, as far back as you know this maternal line.
    • User Preferences --Very Important--you will want to do this right away!
      • Upload a photo of yourself to be used with your matches
      • Provide all the ancestral surnames across all your lines for use with the Family Finder test.
      • Set Preferences

        • Choose whether you want to receive emails from your project administrator.
        • Choose whether your matches will be compared against just the surname project or the entire database
        • Choose how many markers to use in displaying your matches:  12, 25, 37, or 67. (You can switch back and forth, if you wish.)  Many researchers find that it is not helpful to see the matches at 12 markers, as there are so many of them and 12 markers is not enough to confirm a common ancestor.
      • Displaying the Most Most Distant Known Ancestor.
        • This is very important for your surname project.
        • Enter the earliest known ancestor you know for your paternal side and your maternal side.  (Note:  your maternal ancestor is NOT the wife of your Most Distant Known Paternal Ancestor; this is the most distant female you know in your MATERNAL line.)
        • Use the link "Plot Ancestral Locations" to post complete information
    • Order Tests & Upgrades (Standard and Advanced options) 
    • Special Offers - Time-sensitive sales and special offers.
    • Order Certificates One certificate and report is included with each initial test.  You can order more certificates for siblings or others.  To see samples of the certificates from FTDNA, click here.
    • Order Personalized Reports - A 55 - 100 page customized explanation about your DNA results.  $349.00

  • My Maps --
    • Plot Ancestral Locations -- Very important.  Your surname project will use this information to display with your results to help link you to others who share your DNA and paper trail. 
      • Most Distant Known Paternal Ancestor
        • Click "Edit" to enter Paternal Ancestor's name, birth date, and death date.  Click "Next Step"
        • Step 2--Search by Location Name--enter the place of birth of your paternal ancestor (or any place you know of his life if you do not know birth)place. 
                      --Lattitude & Longitude--you can enter these instead if you know them
        • Click "Next StepInformation on Paternal Ancestor you entered will be displayed. 
        • Click "Save" and the information will be saved under Most Distant Known Paternal Ancestor and a blue pin will show the location on the map.
      • Most Distant Known Maternal Ancestor:  (Note:  this is NOT the wife of your Most Distant Known Paternal Ancestor: this is the most distant female ancestor you know in your MATERNAL line.)
        • Step 2--Search by Location Name--enter the place of birth of your paternal ancestor (or any place you know of his life if you do not know birth)place. 
                      --Lattitude & Longitude--you can enter these instead if you know them
        • Click "Next StepInformation on Maternal Ancestor you entered will be displayed. 
        • Click "Save" and the information will be saved under Most Distant Known Maternal Ancestor and a blue pin will show the location on the map.
      • Maps -
        • Shows you the countries of origins of those whose test results match yours.  (push pin color shows the genetic distance)
        • You must have provided your own Most Distant Known Paternal and/or Maternal Ancestor" and their place of origin on the User Preference Pages for your place of origin to be shown on the map.
        • "Map Instructions" in upper right corner gives information on using all the links on the map page. 
        • Choose the number of markers to use to display matches (upper left corner of map)
        • "View Match List" in lower right corner of map
        • "Understanding Your Matches" in the upper right corner links to good information.

 

  • Y-DNA (This section will show for those who were tested for yDNA)
    • Matches - FTDNA provides a lot of information in this section.  Read the instructions near the top of the page and the "Understanding.." links provided.
    • Then scroll down to look at your matches.  Here are some tips that will help understand what you are seeing:
      • You will receive the name and email address of each reported match.  You can contact your matches by clicking on the email address.
      • Exact matches are the most important, but the highest number of markers on which you match another participant is considered most important.
      • Genetic Distance tells you on how many markers you do not match:  For example 12 Marker - Genetic Distance 1, means you do not match on 1 marker, or in other words, you match on 11 out of 12 markers (11/12)
      • How to evaluate your matches: 
        • Number of markers
          • A 12-marker match is generally inadequate for genealogy purposes.  Most researchers will not respond to a contact about a 12-marker match, and many researchers don't even allow comparison of their 12-marker results.
          • A 25-marker match should be at least 23/25.  Many researchers consider this match to be sufficient if you share a surname.
          • A 37-marker match should be at least 33/37.  We consider this to be the lowest matching level for those of different surnames (unless they have connecting paper trails.)
          • A 67-marker match should be at least 61/67.  FTDNA recommends this test when comparing to others with a different surname.  This test is particularly useful in trying to better understand a large genetic family.
        • Where to start
          • Start with your largest marker comparisons, depending on the number of markers you had tested. (12, 25, 37, or 67)
          • Look first at your best match at the most markers you have been tested.  For example, if you were tested at 37 markers, look under "37 Marker Matches"  to see if you have a 37/37 match ("Exact Matches"), 36/37 match ("Genetic Distance-1") or 35/37 match ("Genetic Distance-2")
          • Then go up to the "25 Marker Matches" category to see if you have close matches there.   Look at each name of the matches to see if they have a parenthesis after the name with Y37 or Y67 in it.  If they do, that means you have already found them as matches when you looked at the 37 marker matches, or the match did not hold up at higher resolution.  If the person you closely match at 25 markers does not have a parenthesis with Y37 or Y67 after his name, this means that he has only been tested to 25 markers, and you may want to encourage him to upgrade to 37 to see if your match holds up.
          • You can then look at the "12 Marker Matches" to see if there is a match there.  However, 12 markers are not considered enough by most genetic genealogists to indicate a common ancestor.  If you find a match there who has not upgraded beyond 12 markers, you will want to encourage him to upgrade to see if the match holds up at a higher resolution.
        • Upgrades: The number in parenthesis in your "Matches Found" listing is the number of markers tested by that individual.  If it is more than yours, you will gain byupgrading to compare at the same number of markers the other individual has tested.  For example, if any of your close matches have (Y67) beside the name. and you have only been tested to 37 markers,  you may want to consider upgrading to 67 yourself to see if the match holds up.  See Upgrades for more information. 
        • Contacting MatchesYou can contact any match by clicking on his email address.  See Joining Forces for more information about contacting matches. 
    • Haplotree
      • My Haplotree -- shows you your confirmed or predicted haplogroup and where your specific haplogroup fits within the defined groups of the haplogroup, as determined through SNP testing. 
      • Frequency Map -- shows where your haplogroup originated and where it appears on the globe.
      • Migration Map -- shows your ancient ancestral origins and migrations through past centuries. 
      • My Matches-- List of your matches' ancestral origins, from the information they provided to FTDNA under "Plot Ancestral Origins" on their personal page. 
      • Tells you your yDNA haplogroup, your deep ancestral origin, and explains the definition and significance of haplogroups.
      • A graphic display of your geographic origins and migration trail
      • This will report the number of men that you match at different haplogroup designations and is subdivided by country.
      • Most participants have a haplogroup estimate that was derived by comparing their results with others who have the same result and who have been SNP tested. (Estimated haplogroups are shown in red on our results page.)
      • Haplogroups are reported in varying degrees of detail.  Each level of specificity is defined by an additional letter or number.  The longer the reported haplogroup designation, the more specific it is.  When haplogroups are reported with different levels of specificity, it can be confusing.   Here are examples of haplogroups where the men can or cannot share a recent common ancestor.
        • These men can share a recent common ancestor:  R1b, R1b1, R1b1c - as the differences are levels of specificity.  Another example:  I, I1b, I1b2
        • These men cannot share a recent common ancestor:  R1b1c, R1b1d .  Anytime the specificity is the same and the last character is not matching, these men do not share a recent common ancestor.
      • Scroll to the bottom of this page for a description of FTDNA's haplogroups that are near your result.
      • Some participants do not have a haplogroup estimate.  FTDNA has committed to providing a haplogroup estimate for every participant.  This will require an additional test at FTDNA's expense--which is the good news.  The downside is that you don't know how long this process will take.
    • Ancestral Origins
      • Shows you the countries of origins reported by those whose yDNA test results match yours.
      • It's important to note both the number of matches you have for a country and how many people in the database have reported that country of origin.  (For example, if you have 6 matches from England and 3 from France, you may want to focus more on France, as the number of people from France who have been tested is so much smaller - this means that the proportion from France who match you is much higher.)  This information is given to you in the Percentage column on the right.  Percentages above 2% are considered significant, and percentages above 4% are considered highly significant.
    • DYS Values
      • Your yDNA test results will be shown in "Panels", as the markers were tested in the lab. 
        • Think of the part of the DNA strand that the lab tests as a street.  The "DYS#" is the address on that strand of the DNA.  At each address there is a specific pattern that repeats over and over.  The lab looks at a specific part of the DNA strand and count how many times a pattern repeats at each address (DYS#) on that strand.
        • The number of times the pattern repeats is called an "Allele"  The numbers listed in the "Alleles" row is your own individual count at that marker.  These are the numbers that will be used to compare to other tests in the project and database to see if you share a common ancestor.
      • Click on "Understanding your results" just above the test results to take you to information that will help you read and understand the DNA test results and what they mean.
  • mtDNA (This section will show for those who were tested for mtDNA)
    • Matches

      • You will receive the name and email address of each reported match.  You can contact your matches by clicking on the email address.
      • Matches are reported as low-resolution matches and high-resolution matches.
        • Low resolution matches may indicate a shared common ancestor which may be recent or may date to several thousand years ago.
        • High resolution matches will indicate a more recent common ancestry, but may still predate known paper trails.
      • Here is where you will find a link to MitoSearch.org, the public data base where anyone who was tested at any company can upload mtDNA results for comparison.
    • Ancestral Origins
      • Shows you the countries of origins reported by those whose mtDNA test results match yours. 
      • It's important to note both the number of matches you have for a country and how many people in the database have reported that country of origin.  (For example, if you have 6 matches from England and 3 from France, you may want to focus more on France, as the number of people from France who have been tested is so much smaller - this means that the proportion from France who match you is much higher.)  This information is given to you in the Percentage column on the right.  Percentages above 2% are considered significant, and percentages above 4% are considered highly significant.
    • Results 
      • Shows you yours mtDNA matches 
      • Compares your mtDNA results against the Cambridge Reference Sequence and tells you what your differences (mutations) from that Reference.
      • FTDNA strongly encourages you to click on the link to read the mtDNA Results Tutorial to understand your results. 
      • Click on "Understanding your results" to take you to information that will help you read and understand the DNA test results and what they mean.
  • Tools
    • Refer Friends and Family - --a tool for sending an email to your fellow researchers and family members to get them to take a look and possibly get involved.
    • Interpreting Results - Good information on understanding your results
    • Ysearch.org--a direct link to the public database that allows anyone tested at any company to upload yDNA test results for comparison. 
    • MitoSearch.org--a direct link to the public database that allows anyone tested at any company to upload mtDNA test results for comparison.
    • GEDCOM -  allows you to upload your GEDCOM Family Tree for either your Paternal (yDNA) or Maternal (mtDNA) line.  Once uploaded, your GEDCOM will be able to be viewed only by you, the Project Administrator, and those that have matches with you.
    • Genographic Project -- An easy way to join the National Geographic Genographic Project, which is attempting to map the migratory history of mankind.  For a fee of $15, you can join your results to the NGGP.  (This option will not show on your personal page if you do not have a haplogroup estimate.)

 

For more information to help you understand your test results, click here

Frequently Asked Questions about Test Results