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Origins of the Weingart, Weingarten, Weingartner and associated Surnames

The Roman historian Tacitus tells us that the Germans had no wine, so they must have acquired it from the Romans. The German word wein is derived from the Latin vinum 1. Similarly the English word wine derives from the same Latin root.

Many German names were based on words for fields or pastures - smaller than a field is a garten 2. The German Garten is garden in English whereas the German Gärtner is gardener. The Weingarten and Weingärtner surnames result from the combination of the German words Wein with either Garten or Gärtner. Weingarten refers to a vineyard and Weingärtner would be the one who tends the vineyard. The German speaking countries in Europe include Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Each of these countries along with other areas where German speaking people lived/live (e.g. Poland and Alsace, France) have their own Wine-producing regions which gave rise to these surnames. These regions include:

 

              
              
              
There are 13 official wine regions in present-day Germany in accordance with the German Wine Law.

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Ahr Region in the Ahrweiler district of Rheinland-Pfalz along the Ahr River. The Ahr is a tributary to the Rhine River. Includes the town of Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler and the communities of Heimersheim, Bad Neuenahr, Bachem, AhrWeiler, Walporzheim, Marienthal, Dernau, Rech, Mayschoß and Altenahr

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Baden Southerly most region where wine is produced within Germany along the Rhine River. Includes the Kaiserstuhl area, the Breisgau-Hochschwarzwald district, and the Ortenau district. Within the region are the towns of Auggen, Buggingen, Gottenheim, and the city of Müllheim.

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Franken Region follows the Main River from Aschaffenburg eastwards. Würzburg is the center of the region. Other communities include Castell, Randersacker, Iphofen.

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Hessische Bergstrasse Region is on the opposite (eastern) side of the Rhine River from the Rheinhessen Region. Communities include Bensheim and Heppenheim.

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Mittelrhein The Mittelrhein region stretches from Bingen to Bonn along the Rhine River. Some of communities included in this area are Bacharach, Bad Honnef, Boppard, Braubach, Drachenfels, Kaub, Koblenz, Königswinter, Niederlahnstein, Oberlahnstein, Oberwesel, Remagen, Sankt Goar, Sankt Goarshausen, Spay, Unkel.

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Mosel-Saar-Ruwer The Mosel-Saar-Ruwer wine-growing-region includes the valleys where the Mosel (French: Moselle), Saar and Ruwer Rivers flow. This regions includes Bernkastel-Kues, Koblenz, Saarburg and Trier.

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Nahe Region in Rheinland-Pfalz along the Nahe River and its tributaries of the Glan and Alsenz Rivers. The Nahe River is a tributary to the Rhine River. This region includes the towns and communities of Bad Kreuznach, Burg Layer, Bingerbrück, Burg Sponheim/Burgsponheim, Bad Münster am Stein, Guldental, Langenlonsheim, Meddersheim, Meisenheim, Monzingen, Münster-Sarmsheim, Niederhausen, Obermoschel, Odernheim, Schloßböckelheim/Schloss Böckelheim, Wallhausen, Windesheim/Winzenheim.

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Rheinhessen Largest wine growing region in Germany which is along the Rhine River. Includes the communities of Alzey, Bingen, Ingelheim, Mainz, Nackenheim, Nieder-Olm, Nierstein, Oppenheim, Worms

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Rheingau Region along the north side of the Rhine River between Wiesbaden and Rüdesheim near Frankfurt. Other towns and communities in this region include Eltville, Erbach, Geisenheim, Hochheim, Johannisberg, Kiedrich, Lorch, Martinsthal, Oestrich, Winkel. Other communities include Aßmannshausen, Mittleheim, Hallgarten, Hattersheim, Rauenthal and Neraberg.

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Pfalz Region was formerly known as the Rheinpfalz. The region extends from Kirchheimbolanden (also known as Kirchheim-Bolanden) south to the Alsatian border. The northern half, the Mittelhardt is the home of the most famous vineyards of the Pfalz. Includes the Bad Dürkheim district communities of Bad Dürkheim, Deidesheim, Forst, Wachenheim.

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Sachsen The smallest wine region (750 acres) in Germany which is along the Elbe river around Meissen and Dresden.

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Saale-Unstrut The Saale-Unstrut wine region lies west of Leipzig. The Vineyards of this region are along the Saale and Unstrut rivers around the towns of Freyburg and Naumburg.

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Württemberg Most of the Württemberg vineyards are along the Neckar river. Heilbronn, Stuttgart, and Weinsberg are located on the Neckar river. An example of another wine producing area in Württemberg is Wertheim which is located on the confluence of the Tauber and Main Rivers.
              
              
              
Alsace, France is a region that has German ties

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Alsace, France The Alsace (German: Elsass) region is a plain between the Rhine River in the east and the Vosges mountains in the west. The Alsace region is almost four times longer than it is wide. The Alsace Région is comprised of the Bas-Rhin département in the north and the Haut-Rhin département in the south. Communities found along Alsace's Wine Road include: Ammerschwihr, Andlau, Barr, Cernay, Eguisheim, Colmar (German: Kolmar), Dambach-la-Ville, Gueberschwihr, Guebwiller, Husseren-les-Châteaux, Kaysersberg (German: Kaisersberg), Kintzheim, Marlenheim, Mittelbergheim, Molsheim, Mulhouse (German: Mülhausen), Obernai (German: Oberehnheim), Ottrott, Ribeauvillé, Riquewihr (German: Reichenweiher), Rorschwihr, Rosheim, Sélestat (German: Schlettstadt), Soultzmatt, Strasbourg (German: Straßburg), Thann, Turckheim (German: Türkheim), Vieux-Thann, Westhoffen, and Zellenberg.
              
              
              
Austria (German: Österreich) consists of 9 states or Bundesländer (singular: Bundesland). 4 of these Bundesländer contain wine producing regions.

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Burgenland Burgenland is Austria's easternmost state and is made up of 7 districts. The Eisenstadt-Umgebung district contains the two towns of Oslip and Purbach am Neusiedlersee (also known as Purbach am Neusiedler See or Purbach am See) which are both known for the cultivation of grapes. In addition, the main business of Raiding in the district of Oberpullendorf is viticulture.

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Lower Austria (German: Niederösterreich) The wine producing areas are located in the northeastern and eastern parts of Niederösterreich. Niederösterreich is divided into four regions: Waldviertel, Mostviertel, Industrieviertel, and Weinviertel. The Mostviertel region contains the Wachau valley which is famous for its landscape, culture, and wine. The Danube River flows through the Wachau valley which is situated between Melk and Krems. The Weinviertel or Viertel unter dem Manhartsberg ("quarter below the Manhartsberg") is located in the northeast of Niederösterreich. Weinviertel is Austria's largest wine growing area consisting of the Gänserndorf, Hollabrunn, Korneuburg, Mistelbach and Tulln districts. The town of Korneuburg lies within the district of Korneuburg.

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Styria (German: Steiermark) Lower Styria is famous for its white wine. Graz is the second-largest city in Austria after Vienna and the capital of Styria. Steirische Weinstrasse is the winegrowing region south of Graz and is also known as the "Styrian Tuscany."

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Vienna (German: Wien) Vienna is the world's only capital city with its own vineyards. The wine growing areas (and their associated neighborhoods) within Vienna include Döbling (Grinzing, Neustift am Walde, Nußdorf, Salmannsdorf, Sievering) and Floridsdorf (Stammersdorf, Strebersdorf).
              
              
               
              
              
Switzerland: The Swiss Confederation consists of 26 cantons, of which 7 contain wine producing regions. Of theses 7 cantons, 4 have sizeable German-speaking populations.

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Graubünden or Grisons The largest and easternmost canton of Switzerland is Graubünden (German name) which is also known as Grisons (French name). Wine production occurs around the canton's capital, Chur which is located in the Plessur district. Chur is the oldest Swiss city.

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St. Gallen Wine production can be found in the plains of the Canton of St. Gallen.

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Valais Wine production is one of the main industries of the Valais canton. Although two thirds of the population speaks French, the eastern part of the canton, Upper Valais, speaks German.

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Zürich The canton of Zürich is Switzerland's sixth-largest wine producer, growing 615 hectares of grapes in areas such as Höngg. Several vineyards can be found within the city of Zürich itself, although these account for only around ten hectares of the total. Wine was originally cultivated in the region by Roman settlers, but only became an established part of local farming in the ninth century.
              
              
A region within Poland having German ties

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Zielona Góra One of two wine growing areas within modern-day Poland. The German name for Zielona Góra is Grünberg. Located in the historical area of Silesia. Since about the end of the 13th century or beginning of the 14th, Silesian dukes invited many German settlers into Silesia. The first wineries of Zielona Góra were built in 1314. In 1742, most of Silesia was seized by Frederick the Great of Prussia. From that time until 1945, Grünberg (a.k.a. Zielona Góra) was in the Prussian Province of Silesia (Provinz Schlesien). As a result of World War II, this area became part of Poland in 1945 at the end of the war.

1. George F. Jones, German-American Names (Baltimore, MD, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1995), p. 38 para 102
2. Ibid., p. 46 para 122


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