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Answering a few common questions we've received.

How does DNA testing help Treece genealogy?  The basic idea is two or more living people do a DNA test, and if their DNA is similar enough, we know they have a common ancestor.  It's a little more complicated than that, but not much.

How do you get DNA from a deceased ancestor?  You don't, at least not for this project.

How does DNA testing help with the paper records?  Paper records are not always correct, at least biologically.  Genealogists routinely make some assumptions to fill in the blanks, and there are other reasons the paper trail might not match the biological history.  DNA tests are not subject to such assumptions. DNA testing augments the family tree by either providing supporting evidence for a relationship or completely refuting connections that were assumed to be true. This leads the genealogist to new theories and research.

What if I don't have time to go to the doctor for a DNA sample?  You will not have to leave your home.  The kit is sent in the mail and you collect the DNA by brushing the inside of your cheek.  The kit has everything you need and simple instructions.

What if I don't have time to learn about DNA or research the topics or study the family tree?  We're here to help. You can choose to sit on the sidelines and observe the findings (if you wish). We would hope you at least provide what information you already know about your lineage.

How do I find people who match my DNA?  They show up as matches under your account automatically after the test results are complete.

What if the matches are not "Treece" surname?  It happens.  We have project participants matching "Wall" for example.  The beauty of this project is we may be able to figure out why that is. There are many possible explanations, from "woodshed" to adoption and re-marriages.  The technical term is "NPE" or non-paternal event.  Don't be afraid of this possibility, embrace it!

Family Finder? We've been talking about yDNA, which is the most useful for starting a surname project.  yDNA is passed from father to son only. Only males can do this type of test.  Family Finder is a different type of DNA test that is complementary (you can do both, if you wish, and non-males can do Family Finder), and it's good at locating possible cousins who are related within about 4-6 generations, typically (sometimes more/less). Similar to yDNA, Family Finder works by identifying two or more individuals who have tested and have "matching enough" DNA.

Haplogroup? A haplogroup is a set of people who have similar haplotypes.  A haplotype is like a "level up" from the individual DNA results (or you might think of it like a branch on the human family tree).  R1b is the most common haplogroup in European populations, and is currently the most common haplogroup in the Treece DNA project.  Generally, if two individuals have different haplogroups, they are not related (biologically speaking, don't share a common biological ancestor) in recent history.

I'm ready; how do I get involved? Sign up for the project and get your test started. Let us know if you have any questions. We want to assist. You may also volunteer to research topics, donate funds to the account (used for ordering new tests), locate additional relatives who might participate, and there is a great deal (and growing) of information on DNA science and advanced topics for matching results, if you're so inclined. Have questions about your results? Let us know, and we'll try to help.

Which test do I order? You can always contact us for advice, but generally speaking, for a new male participant, we recommend the 37-marker yDNA test as a place to start.  This may be the only test that's needed.  In a few cases, we might recommend a different test, depending on the goals and the particulars.  We actually prefer that you contact us with questions so we can help you make the right choice based on what you expect to learn and how the project may benefit.  If the expense of the test is keeping you from moving forward, check with us to see if there are any project funds that can be applied.  We accept donations to help cover the cost of the tests.

 


The Treece DNA project has a number of lineages. The project identifies a lineage when DNA tests on two or more men show a high probability that they have a common ancestor. More detail about the lineages is available on the Results and Patriarch pages.  The significance and learnings grow as more people participate.  We would like to see several individuals participate from each major branch of the family tree.  One reason we want several is it establishes the "normal" values for the markers.

 

 

Lineage I

Probable Haplotype

Coordinator

Surnames

About
R1b1a2a1a1b Mary Lou Clegg
marylouclegg AT comcast.net
Treece, Dries, Bauman, Simmons, Treese Lineage I is currently the largest group in the project. Traditional genalogy indicates these members are descendants of Andreas Dries, the German immigrant from 1733.

 

 

Lineage II

Probable Haplotype

Coordinator

Surnames

About
R1b1a2a1a1a Jef Treece
treece AT gsp.org
Treece, Pittman, Wall Lineage II is dissimilar to Lineage I,  Most of the close matches outside of this project are with either Pittman or Wall surnames

 

 

Lineage III

Probable Haplotype

Coordinator

Surnames

About
R1b1a2 Mary Lou Clegg
marylouclegg AT comcast.net
Treece, Cisco Lineage III is dissimilar to Lineage I and Lineage II,

 

 

Others

Probable Haplotype

Coordinator

Surnames

About
various Jef Treece
treece AT gsp.org
Trace, Daniel, Treas, Driess We don't yet have matches for this group.  DNA is dissimilar enough that there is a very low probability of a paternal relationship to others in the project in recent times.

 

 



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