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Welcome to the FTDNA Parkison Project Website

Origin of the surname Parkison & Parkinson

The Parkison name is of Scottish origin, originating at a time when the "i" was used in the Older Scots
Tongue as we use the apostrophe today, and is equivalent to PARK'S SON.
This would be the equivalent to the name Parkerson (son of Parker) in English.
Over the years some Parkison families have changed to the more common name of Parkinson.

The name Parkinson, is based on a father whose first name was Peter (or its diminutive "Parkin").
Parkinson is a name of English origin and was originally concentrated in a great number
of non-related families along the east coast, midlands, and northern England
(Lincolnshire, Yorkshire, Lancashire, and Durham). And, it too has found its way into Scotland.

The Parkinson family originated in the border area of England and Scotland. By as early as 1625 had settled in Ireland according to one source, and has since spread thoughout the world.
We are a somewhat small group in relation to other surnames. The United States Census Bureau has the Parkinson surname ranked as #3,524, this surname is possessed by 0.003% of the population. And the Parkison surname is ranked at #15,089, and possessed by 0.001% of the population.

We hope to create a database of as many Parkison/Parkinson males as possible, in the hope of finding matches among the samples. This should be particularly helpful for those who trace their ancestry back to the period before the earliest census records and do not know where their family came from.  The Group is open to anyone having an interest in the surname.  You are strongly encouraged to submit  of what you know of your Parkison ancestors.  Your ancestral lineage may be very helpful to others who may recognize your names and thus help you discover relationships.
 

How does DNA testing work?
Each participant receives a kit, which contains instructions and materials allowing him to swab his cheek for DNA, preserve it, and return it to FamilyTreeDNA. The lab then analyzes the DNA found on the Y-chromosome. This DNA is passed down (almost) unaltered from father to son. Therefore, those who share a large percentage of "markers" share a male ancestor within a certain number of generations (depending on how many and the type of test).

FamilyTreeDNA has tests for 12, 37 or 67 markers. You can start with any level of test, and then upgrade later. However, while no additional swabbing is necesssary for an upgrade, the sample must be processed again (which takes several weeks). The added cost of the upgrade is more than the initial combined price. In our experience, almost all participants that start with the 12-marker test ultimately upgrade to test more markers, so starting with 37 markers usually saves time and money. If there is a strong chance you are related to one of the lines already tested, a 67 marker test will be most useful in helping to figure out just where your line falls.

What do the results mean?
The results are expressed in matches. If you do the 37 marker test, for example, you'll find out those with whom you match at the 12 and 37 marker levels. You also know, through our website, those lines that you do not match. So in general, the results can tell you several things:
• Confirm that a participant is related to a particular male line, even if he doesn't know (yet) how that connection may come in.
• Or, confirm that a line already traced is likely accurate - if two 21st century men share markers, and they've traced their male lines back to a common 18th century fore-father, this is good evidence that their lines are accurately traced.
• Or, the test can tell you you're not related to a particular line. This, while disappointing, can save one years of researching in the wrong places.

Who should participate?
Any man named Parkison, Parkinson, Parkson or one of the other derivatives of the surname. Your male line must be all Parkison. 

Are you a Parkison female or grandson? Sponsor your father/brother/cousin. They don't have to do anything except swab their cheek - you'll get all the results. Do 'Join' the Parkison Project before ordering the kit to get the discount. Kits may be paid for when ordering or when returning the kit for processing.

Still have questions? Do read the FAQ page at https://www.familytreedna.com/faq/answers.aspx

Some Noted Parkinson-Parkisons':

Sydney Parkinson (c. 1745-1771) Born in Edinburg, Scotland. Accompanied Captain Cook on his first voyage. He made sketches of the botanical and zoological specimens observed. On January 26th, 1771, Sydney died and was buried at sea.

James Parkinson (1755-1824) Published numerous medical works. His most important was on the disease that was later named for him.

Several Parkisons served in the American revolution, including William, David and Daniel. Later, at least one Parkison was involved in the "Whiskey Rebellion" in western Pennsylvania. Benjamin Parkison was arrested but was later issued a pardon by President George Washington.
James Parkinson (1755-1824) Published numerous medical works. His most important was on the disease that was later named for him.

Several Parkisons served in the American revolution, including William, David and Daniel. Later, at least one Parkison was involved in the "Whiskey Rebellion" in western Pennsylvania. Benjamin Parkison was arrested but was later issued a pardon by President George Washington.

Surname DNA testing is the newest tool available to genealogists. These tests help genealogists verify their paternal ancestry (father's father) in a quick and easy way. It saves time, prevents mistakes, and provides invaluable data that can be obtained in no other way.

 

This Family Project was started to:

1. Help researchers on common or related families work together to find their common heritage  (See the Patriarch Page)

2. Identify the DNA of the ancestor families and compile them and their lost branches into distinct genetic lineages through DNA matches

  • Parkison
  • Parkinson
  • Parkerson
  • Parkeson
  • Parkson
  • Parkis
  • and others that may be related

Useful Links

World Families Network Forums
Parkison Family Forum
Pedigree Forum
World Families Network General Discussion

Websites:

Parkison Genealogy

International Society of Genetic Genealogy

 

Testing

How many to test? 12, 37, 67 markers?
http://www.familytreedna.com/faq2.html (copy/paste URL)

In order to confirm research and/or find a match to your ancestry, DNA is much more successful at the 37 or 67 marker level is establishing a more secure relationship match: (Very Tightly Related, Tightly Related, Related, Probably Related, Possible Related). You will always be able to "Refine" (Upgrade) your makers to a higher level at a later date. However, depending on an individual’s level of expenditure, the following is offered by FamilyTreeDNA based on current rates:

……FTDNA KIT at Discounted Costs for NEW MEMBERS of the Parkison Project
*Recommended for FTDNA Parkison Project

FTDNA Test Price

12-Marker yDNA Test $99  
25-Marker yDNA Test $124  
37-Marker yDNA Test $149  
67-Marker yDNA Test $248  
mtDNA Test $99  
mtDNA Plus Test $149  
mtDNA Full Sequence $449  
12-Marker yDNA + mtDNA $179  
37-Marker yDNA + mtDNAPlus $278  
67-Marker yDNA + mtDNAPlus $377  
Super DNA (67 yDNA + mt Full Sequence) $695  

 

*Add $4.00 in USA or $6.00 International for shipping and handling

NOTE: New Members for the Parkison Project – Click on: Join our Parkison Project found in left hand Sidebar

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Click here to order a DNA test now

For basic information, visit World Families Network and check out the "Getting Started" block


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