Questions, error observations or suggestions may be sent to smccants@hullfamilyassociation.org


Hull Y-DNA Results 101

What happens after a Y DNA test? The results are divided in groups. The first division is Haplogroup (I, R, E, etc.) which are divided into subgroups. Most Hull donors are either I1 or R1b.

The Haplogroup does not tell where the earliest ancestors originate. There are Hull donors with ancestors from England and from Germany within Haplogroup I1. There are Hull donors with ancestors from England and from Germany within Haplogroup R1b. One conclusion you can draw from the Haplogroup division: If you are I1, you do not share a common direct paternal ancestor with someone who is R1b. In particular, if you descend from American immigrant Richard Hull (R1b) who was born ca. 1599 and who wrote a will on 21 Aug 1662 in New Haven Co., CT (which was probated 6 Jan 1662/3), then you do not share a common direct paternal ancestor with American immigrant brothers George and the Rev. Joseph Hull of Crewkerne, co. Somerset, England (whose descendants are I1).

The DNA test results also include a set of (12, 25, 37 or 67) markers which is called a Haplotype. When markers are compared for several donors, a "difference" is computed. In general, a Lineage is "declared" when two men are matching 23/25 or better. The common set of markers becomes the Lineage Haplotype.

The Hull DNA Project is an open project. Anyone may join. The Group Administrators will choose which results to include in the Y-DNA table. Generally, any Hull/Hohl/Holl surnamed donors are included in the Y-DNA table. Other surnamed donors must include earliest known ancestors. Hall and Hill donors are encouraged to join the Hall DNA Project and Hill DNA Project which include many more donors with those surnames. Donors whose results very closely match a Hull DNA Lineage Group are usually accepted if they provide their earliest known ancestor. Donors may also join the Project who have a Hull ancestor and take either the mtDNA or Family Finder test.


Hull Lineage Groups

The DNA results defines the group. This is a basic outline of the lineages groups, primarily listing dates and places of the earliest ancestors of the donors. This is an attempt to describe the Hull Y-DNA results with words more than numbers. Both the Y-DNA chart and this page will sometimes list the branch of a family instead of the earliest known ancestor. For example, the first 30 donors identify four great-grandsons of Richard Hull d 1599, namely Josias and Cornelius Hull, sons of George Hull and Tristram and Benjamin Hull, sons of The Rev. Joseph Hull. With other lineage groups, sometimes the earliest known ancestor is a John Hull and nothing else is known about him. In those cases, the earliest ancestor listed on the Y-DNA chart is one with either an estimated birth or death year or the name of spouse.


Haplogroup I

Lineage I-1   Crewkerne Hulls

Lineage "I-1" is the largest group of donors in the Hull DNA project with a common Haplotype (the set of markers which define a lineage). This group is referred to as the Crewkerne Hull Group, even though all may not descend from Crewkerne, co. Somerset, England.

30 donors have traced their ancestor back to the two early American immigrants, George and the Rev. Joseph Hull. Their earliest known ancestor is Richard Hull and his second wife Alice; the will of Richard Hull was proved 6 Jun 1599 in Crewkerne, co. Somerset, England. His son was Thomas "the Younger" Hull who married Joan(e) Peson on 11 Jan 1572/73 in Crewkerne. They are the parents of George and the Rev. Joseph Hull.

George Hull married Thamzen Michell on 27 Aug 1614 in Crewkerne. DNA donors descend from sons Josias and Cornelius. Josias Hull was baptized on 10 Nov 1616 in Crewkerne; he married Elizabeth Loomis. Lt. Cornelius Hull Sr. was baptized 14 Apr 1628 in Crewkerne; he married Rebecca Jones.

The Rev. Joseph Hull was baptized 25 Apr 1596 in Crewkerne. The Rev. Joseph Hull had two wives. DNA donors descend from sons Tristram and Benjamin. Son Tristram descends from the first wife whose name is unknown. Tristram was born ca. 1624, probably in co. Devon in England and married Blanche. Son Benjamin descends from the second wife Agnes. Benjamin Hull was baptized on 24 Mar 1638/39 in Plymouth Co., MA and married Rachel York(e). Descendants of Rev. Joseph Hull includes Samuel Hull (born ca. 1735, died 1814, married Martha Glover) who is a son of Judge Joseph Hull and Susanne Stelle. The Hull Family of America (1913) mistakenly identified this Samuel Hull as the son of Daniel Hull and Mary Quinney/Quincy (whose descendants are in Lineage Group R1b-14); that book also incorrectly identified the Samuel Hull (whose descendants are in Lineage Group R1b-6) as the son of Judge Joseph Hull. DNA has shown that these were incorrect. Donors with haplogroup I1 do not share a direct paternal ancestor with donors of haplogroup R1b.

Three donors in this group probably do not trace their ancestors back to those two American immigrants. Their earliest known ancestors are in England in the late 1700's.

About 20 donors in this group suspect that they descend from George or the Rev. Joseph Hull, but have been unable to prove their lineage that far back. They descend from:

This project also accepts donors whose Y-DNA results match very closely with Hull donors. The ancestors in this lineage group are:

There are several Hull Family Association (HFA) Journal articles featuring ancestors of donors in Lineage Group I-1. These include articles on:



Lineage I-2   German Peter Thomas Hohl Line

Peter Thomas Hohl was born ca. 1713, Palatinate, Germany. He married his second wife Susanna Margaretha Dieffenbach on 25 Nov 1750 in Lancaster Co., PA. His will was proven 19 Mar 1776 in Augusta Co., VA (now Highland Co., VA).

The Hull Family Association Journal, Vol. 10. #1, Spring 1999, features a article on the Sons of the German Peter Thomas Hohl/Holl/Hull & Susanna Margaretha Diefenbach.



Lineage I-3      

This group consists of two donors, but no known common ancestor. The earliest ancestor of one resided in England and Canada. The earliest ancestor of the other is from Ohio.



Lineage I-4   Irish Hulls; Ruddock Group     

These four donors all tested with 67 markers and the distance from each other only ranges from 1 to 3. This lineage group includes two with the Hull surname and two with Ruddock (or variant) surname. Two share a common Hull ancestor.



Haplogroup R1b


Lineage R1b-1   German Hulls

This is a large group of R1b matching donors. There is a variety of earliest known ancestors including immigrants to America from two locations in Germany. Other donors have not identified the immigrant ancestor.

The subgroup designated as possibly in this group have markers that are in the gray area of closeness. This may indicate a common ancestor that is several generations back in time from the donors whose results are closer.

Possibly in group R1b-1

The Hull Family Association Journal, Vol. 14. #2, Summer 2003, feature an article on Jacob Hull and Elizabeth Souder. This is an update to previous articles in Vol. 4 #1, Vol. 7 #1 and #3, Vol. 10 #2 and Vol. 13 #3.

The Hull Family Association Journal, Vol. 24, #1, Spring 2014, pp. 3–7, features a article with the breakthrough discovery proving descent of Henry Hull who married Catharine Donnenwirth King to his immigrant ancestor Johann Nickolas Holl.



Lineage R1b-2

The earliest known ancestors from this group are Richard, Jeremiah/Jere and Arion/Aaron Hull.



Lineage R1b-3

There are a number of earliest known ancestors for this group but no known connection between them. The dates and locations of these earliest ancestors vary. Hopefully as more donors match this group, more clues will be discovered to break through these brick walls and discover links between the earliest known ancestors.

It is difficult to determine the "common" marker values (group "Haplotype") because of the wide variation within this lineage group. This group has been divided into sections of donors based on marker values. It is probable that the common ancestor for each section is more recent than the common ancestor for the entire lineage group. For readers not interested in the marker comparison, just assume the donors within a section are more closely related (and you can bypass the following discussion of marker values).

This discussion only compares the first 37 markers. Seven donors have tested 67 markers. Of those values (markers 38-67), all are identical except for one value. (Differences are called mutations.)

This group is first divided based on the value of the marker "DYS 576" (seen easily as the yellow vertical line in this section of the Y-DNA chart). The donors in the first two sections have a marker value of 17 and the donors in the last three sections have a marker value of 18. It is possible that this mutation occurred at one time and all the descendants with 17 are in one branch of the family and all descendants with 18 are in the other branch of this family. However, it is also possible that this mutation occurred multiple times in multiple branches of this family.

The first section consists of six donors with five earliest known ancestors. These donors have matching 37 markers. The second section consists of the four remaining donors with "DYS 576" value of 17. The third section consists of four donors with "DYS 576" value of 18 who have identical 37 marker values; three of these four have the same earliest known ancestor. The fourth group consists of four donors with "DYS 576" value of 18 who have relatively close marker values. The final section consists of three donors whose marker values differ the most from the rest of this lineage group.

The first section consists of six donors with five earliest known ancestors. These donors have matching 37 markers. The earliest known ancestors for the first section are:

The second section represents four donors. The earliest known ancestors from this section are:

The third section consists of four donors who have identical 37 marker values with "DYS 576" value of 18. Three of these four descend from the first ancestor listed:

The fourth section consists of four donors with similar marker values (with "DYS 576" value of 18). The earliest known ancestors from this section are:

The markers of the donors in the fifth section are not close in comparison with most of the donors in the first four sections, but are close enough to one or two donors to be grouped with this Lineage Group. This implies that the distance to a common ancestor with the other sections is probably more distant. There are three donors in this section and two descend from the first ancestor listed below. The earliest known ancestors from this section are:

The Hull Family Association Journal, Vol. 13. #3, Autumn 2002, features an article on Jacob Hull Sr (born 1776) and two wives Frances "Fanny" Robinson and Catharine Snyder.

The Hull Family Association Journal, Vol. 14. #3, Autumn 2003, features two articles on Henry Hull and Catherine Snider.



Lineage R1b-4

This group consists of two donors whose markers which match 24/25. There is a third donor who is listed as possibly Lineage R1b-4; he matches 23/25 with one of the above donors, but 22/25 with the other. (As more donors are added to this group, or if these donors upgrade to more markers, it will determine whether this should be one group or two.).

Possibly in group R1b-4

The Hull Family Association Journals, Vol. 23, #2, Summer 2013, pp. 53-68 and Vol. 24, #1, Spring 2014, pp. 9–15, feature articles on descendants of Richard Hull and Patience Mains of New Hampshire.



Lineage R1b-5

This group consists of two donors who descend from Isaac Holl/Hull. As in the previous group, these two are closely matched (24/25). A third donor was moved from possibly Lineage R1b-5 to not assigned to a Lineage Group.

The Hull Family Association Journal, Vol. 14. #2, Summer 2003, features a article on immigrant Isaac Holl.



Lineage R1b-6

This group of 13 donors has the closest match of markers of any group this size. Five donors have identical matches of 67 Y DNA markers. One donor who tested 37 markers matches 37/37 with these five donors. Their set of marker values has been designated as the group haplotype (the numbers displayed in the top row in the Y-Chart). These match no further than 35/37 with all other donors in the group. The descendant of Solomon Hull has the most distant matches in the group, yet he is a distance of 3 to 5 (of 37 markers) with all others in the group.

It is possible that Abraham, Samuel (born 1809) and Solomon Hull may be sons of an Isaac Hull who served in the Rev. War.



Possibly Lineage R1b-7 was disbanded due to divergent results after upgrade



Lineage R1b-8     

The Hull DNA project includes donors with other surnames whose results closely match Hull donors. This lineage group includes a Williams donor with identical 67 marker results with the descendant of William Hull. The third donor in this group tested 37 markers and only differs one from the other two donors. The two Hull donors descend from two sons of Isaac Hull.



Lineage R1b-9 Moses Hull     

This lineage group was the greatest surprise of the Hull DNA project. Before DNA testing, Moses Hull (who was born ca. 1729 and died ca. June 1778 in Rowan Co, NC) and his son Moses Hull (who was born ca. 1751 and died ca. 1840) were known to be descendants of the Rev. Joseph Hull. The question was merely how they descended from Joseph. Since there are descendants from three sons of Moses Hull (b. ca. 1751), DNA clearly indicates that this Moses is not a biological direct male descendant of the Rev. Joseph Hull. What is not known is whether this is a totally different line or whether there was a Non-Paternal event in this family.

The earliest ancestors in this lineage group may descend from this second Moses Hull. Josephus (born ca. 1772), Jesse (born ca. 1773) and Moses (born ca. 1774) are thought to be sons of this second Moses. Daniel (born ca. 1797), Jesse (born ca. 1808) and David (born ca. 1811) are thought to be sons of the third Moses.

There is a strong paper trail linking Samuel Hull of Hunterdon Co., NJ to Moses to Moses to Josephus. The undated will of Samuel Hull of Amwell Twp., Hunterdon Co., NJ (proved in 1761) mentioned wife Margaret and left land to eldest son Moses. The will of Margaret Hull (written in 1768, proved in 1769) also mentioned son Moses (who was executor). Moses Hull died in 1778 in Rowan Co., NC leaving a will which left land in Anwell Twp. to his sons Moses and Joseph Hull. In 1792, Moses Hull of Wilkes Co., NC, gave a Power of Attorney to his son Josephus to settle affairs and sell land in Amwell Twp., NJ.

Descendants of William Gifford also match this group.

These are the Earliest Known Ancestors (EKA) of the donors in this Lineage Group:

There is uncertainty about the early lineages of donors in this group. Each of these may not be the sons of the second or third Moses Hull. However, the DNA indicates that they are closely related. There are six donors from these five lines whose DNA markers match closely. However, two donors tested only 12 markers and one donor tested only 25 markers. Of these six donors, there is only one who differs (by only one marker) in the first 25 markers. Of the three donors who have tested 67 markers, the maximum difference is only a distance of 3 meaning these donors have a common ancestor. One donor who matched this group descends from Daniel Hull, born 1797. One donor who does not match this group also has a paper trail to Daniel Hull, born 1797. More donors are desired from all of these lines, but especially from Daniel Hull. Family Finder (autosomal DNA) links descendants from Lineage Groups R1b-9 and R1b-13.

Note: The donors in this lineage group do not descend from the Rev. Joseph Hull of Crewkerne, England (whose descendants are in Lineage Group I-1).

Note: DNA Markers of descendants of this Daniel Hull do not match the DNA of descendant of Daniel Christie Hull, son of Joseph Hull and Keziah Christie (who is in Lineage Group R1b-14).



Lineage Group R1b-10      

The two donors in this lineage group both tested with 37 markers and are a distance of 3.



Lineage Group R1b-11 Green Hull of NC/(W)VA      

Both donors descend from Green Hull



Lineage Group R1b-12      

Both donors descend from Thomas Hull and son Francis Marion Hull.



Lineage R1b-13 James Monroe Hull of TN or KY

This is a lineage group whose ancestor was thought to be the same as an ancestor in lineage group R1b-9. Both donors in this group descend from James Monroe Hull. He was thought to be the son of Daniel Hull and Elizabeth (of group R1b-9), but the DNA does not match. The lineage groups are defined by matching marker results. Family Finder (autosomal DNA) links descendants from ancestors of both Lineage Groups R1b-9 and R1b-13. Families of both Daniel Hull and James Monroe Hull moved to Morgan Co., IL, Johnson Co., TX and Carroll Co., AR.



Lineage Group R1b-14 MD and SC Hulls      

No common ancestor has been found for these two donors; one ancestor was from Maryland and the other from South Carolina:

Note: DNA Markers of descendants of this Daniel Hull do not match the DNA of descendants of paternal cousins of Cordell Hull (who are in Lineage Group R1b-9).

Note: DNA Markers of descendants of this Joseph Hull do not match the DNA of descendants of paternal cousins of either Jacob Hull (who married Fanny Robinson and Catherine Snider) or Henry Hull (who married Catherine Snyder) of Lineage Group R1b-3.

Note: Neither of these donors descend from the Crewkerne Hulls whose descendants are in Lineage Group I-1.

The Hull Family Association Journal, Vol. 20. #2, Summer 2010, features a article on Joseph Hull and Keziah Christie Hull Family Records.



Possibly Lineage R1b-15 John and James Hall

These two donors match exactly with 25 markers, but there is a distance of 6 with 37 markers since one marker has a difference of 4.



Haplogroup E


Lineage Group E-1 Rev. Hope Hull      

All donors in this group descend from the Rev. Hope Hull.

The Hull Family Association Journal, Vol. 14, #3, Autumn 2003, pp. 121-128, features a article on the Reverend Hope Hull. The Hull Family Association Journal, Vol. 22, #2, Autumn 2012 has an article on Georgia Hull descendants of the Reverend Hope Hull.



Ancestors of donors who are not assigned to a Lineage Group include


Wanted: New Hull DNA Donors


Information on ordering back issues of Hull Family Association is found at hullfamilyassociation.com under publications.


Questions, error observations or suggestions may be sent to smccants@hullfamilyassociation.org . Donors may submit ancestral information to be added to this page. Send to the Hull DNA Project group administrator or to smccants@hullfamilyassociation.org

Volunteers or suggestions are welcome for the What's New Page which has finally been updated.


        Updated 10 Sep 2014 by Sheran