Your Matches on Your Project's Results Page

 

Evaluating Your Matches At WFN Project Websites

  • Look for Lineages

    • Your matches share a Lineage with you. 
    • This means that they share enough common markers with you to confirm that you share a common ancestor. 
    • The common ancestor could be the earliest ancestor on the oldest pedigree or could have lived as little as one generation earlier (or could have lived centuries earlier than any of the known ancestors.)
    • A Lineage is "declared" when two men are matching 23/25, 33/37, 61/67 or better. 
    • Matches at only 12 markers are not considered enough to confirm a shared ancestor, and cannot be included in a Lineage.  
       
  • Look to see if the matching test results are listed by earliest known ancestor, to see if you recognize this name from your family tree.
     
  • Take a look at your project's Patriarchs Page to see if the person whose results you match has posted a pedigree.

    • You can identify his pedigree by the code identity number or kit number which appears at the end of any pedigree that we can match with a test participant. 
    • You will find his contact email address on the first line of the pedigree.  Change the AT to @ and remove spaces to send him an email.
       
  • If your match has not posted a pedigree and you would like to contact him, send an email to your project administrator.  He/she will usually be happy to pass your email along to your match to request that he contact you to share information.
     
  • Some (most) of your matches on the project’s Results page will also appear as a match on your personal page matches at FTDNA.

    • However, some of them will not, as they may not have tested at FTDNA, they may not be a member of your project, or they may have chosen not to show publicly as a match at the FTDNA website. 
    • Currently, it is difficult to correlate which project members you match on the project’s Results Page with the persons your match on your personal page at FTDNA, as Project websites use the kit number or an identity number to identify project members, while FTDNA identifies your matches by name. 
    • To protect privacy, project websites will not use the member’s name, so you may have to ask your project administrator to help you get in touch with your matches shown on the project website’s Results page. 
       
  • Your Project Administrator may alert you whenever a new posting is made on the Results Page or the Patriarch Page.  Take a moment to check it out to see if it is of interest to you.
  • Comparing Your Results at Your Project's Website at Worldfamilies.net

    • Your results will be listed by your code identity number and your earliest known ancestor (if you have provided his name--otherwise we will use your initials.)
    • If your results match another participant's test results, we will group your results and color them in the same background color.
    • Any mutations (differences in the number of times the pattern repeats at a particular marker) between your test results and another you closely match will be colored in a different color.
    • The project administrator will group the test results into "Lineages" when two men who share a common ancestor match at 23/25 or better.  (see "Lineage", above)
  • Analyzing your Results at your Worldfamilies.net Project Website:

    • When you have a match on the Results Page, look to see if the matching test results are listed by earliest known ancestor, to see if you recognize this name from your family tree.
    • Take a look at your project's Patriarchs Page to see if the person whose results you match has posted a pedigree.  You can identify his pedigree by the code identity number which appears at the end of any pedigree that we can match with a test participant.  You will find his contact email address on the first line of the pedigree.  Change the AT to @ and remove spaces to send him an email.
    • If he has not posted a pedigree and you would like to contact him, send an email to your project administrator.  He/she will usually be happy to pass your email along to your match to request that he contact you to share information.
    • You may be contacted by your Project Administer or another test participant to alert you to a match.
    • Your Project Administrator may alert you whenever a new posting is made on the Results Page or the Patriarch Page.  Take a moment to check it out to see if it is of interest to you.
    • How many markers must match to prove or disprove that you share a common ancestor?
    • Here are some guidelines:

      • For those who tested at 12 markers:

        • Matches of less than 9/12 – the two participants do not share a common ancestor*
        • Matches of 9/12 - there is a tiny chance that the participants share a common ancestor. You'll need to test at 37 markers to find a true shared genetic match that starts with such a low match. (The author has not yet seen a 9/12 become an accepted genetic match - but has heard of one case)
        • Matches of 10/12 – there is a small chance that the participants share a common ancestor. Increase to 25 markers and re-evaluate
        • Matches of 11/12 and 12/12 – there is an improved chance that the participants share a common ancestor. Increase to 25 markers and re-evaluate
        • CAUTION: a 12/12 match - even with the same surname - can be a random match. If a solid paper trail connects the 12/12 match, you can be reasonably certain of shared ancestry, but without the connecting paper trail - you can only be sure by upgrading to at least 25 markers
      • For those who tested at 25 markers:

        • Matches of less than 21/25 – the two participants do not share a common ancestor*
        • Matches of 21/25 & 22/25 – there is a small chance that the participants share a common ancestor. Consider all of the traditional genealogy insights and try to obtain more participants to represent the affected families. Upgrade to 37 markers
        • Matches of 23/25, 24/25 & 25/25 – there is a high probability that participants who share a surname share a common ancestor. If there is no shared paper trail, a comparison at 37 or 67 markers can be useful.
        • You may also refer to the chart prepared by Family Tree DNA: Click Here
      • For those who tested at 37 markers:

        • Matches of less than 31/37 – the two participants do not share a common ancestor*
        • Matches of 31/37 and 32/37 - the two participants have a small possibility that may share a common ancestor from the early days of surnames. This is an area with little clear insight. An upgrade to 67 markers is encouraged
        • Matches of 33/37 - some researchers consider this to be a match and some don't. If there is a shared common ancestor - it will be more than a few 100s of years ago. Upgrade to 67 markers for additional clarity.
        • Matches of 34/37, 35/37, 36/37 & 37/37 - the participants share a recent common ancestor
        • You may also refer to the chart prepared by Family Tree DNA: Click Here
      • For those who tested at 67 markers:

        • Matches of less than 60/67 – the two participants probably do not share a common ancestor*. This is still being studied - but unless your match is nearly 60/67 and you have some reason to believe there is a shared ancestor since the advent of surnames - you should consider your near miss as "no match"
        • Matches of 60/67 and 61/67 - the two participants may share a common ancestor from the early days of surnames. This is still being studied
        • Matches of 62/67 and better - researchers consider these to be a match - indicating a shared common ancestor
        • You may also refer to the chart prepared by Family Tree DNA: Click Here

        What if you have NO matches? 

      • *We mean a common direct paternal ancestor within the historical period of surnames."
    • This means that you do not share a common ancestor with any of the other men tested so far in the project. If you believe that your pedigree is completely accurate and that there have been no "non-paternity" events in your line, it also means that your ancestral line does not share a common ancestor with any of the men tested so far in the project However, you'll need a confirming result from a second man to be certain on this point. (If you find and test a man descended from a different son of your earliest ancestor, and if the two of you match - you'll know the DNA of your most recent common ancestor. You'll also know the DNA of every ancestor between you and that common ancestor.)  So here are the steps you can take:
    • Upgrade, if needed, to at least 37 markers  (Most of the mutations may be in the first markers.)
    • Test your most distant known cousin to confirm your genetic results.
    • Test a known descendant of a family you think you match or of a family living in the area where yours lived who was closely associated with your family (possible unrecorded adoption).
    • Join your Geographic and Haplogroup Projects
    • Be Patient.  The person who will match you and help unlock your genealogy may decide to be tested at some point in the future.  When he does, your results and pedigree will already be available and ready to help you make the connection you desire!  
      At this point, you may decide you need to upgrade.  Learn more about upgrades.

    Frequently Asked Questions About Results