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rms2
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« on: July 29, 2011, 09:50:07 AM »

I am thinking of testing with 23andMe, but, unlike some of you, I don't have an unlimited amount of money to spend on dna testing. It seems to me that 23andMe supplies a lot of b*a*n*g  for the buck: y-dna and full genome mtDNA testing, as well as extensive autosomal stuff.

I have just enough in my dna testing budget to spring for the 23andMe test and a full year of membership.

If you tested with 23andMe, let me know what you think. Should I do it?

Thanks in advance!
« Last Edit: July 29, 2011, 09:55:32 AM by rms2 » Logged

Maliclavelli
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« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2011, 11:24:23 AM »

As you perhaps know, I have been tested by DNAHeritage, SMGF, Geogene, EthnoAncestry, deCODEme, FTDNA, 23andMe. I am not a millionaire. The fact is that Euro gets a good exchange with dollar. By the last offer, I have tested at 23andMe my mother, my wife, my son, a cousin of mine and the husband of a second cousin of mine (me and my daughter had been tested before). Practically with 108 dollars each person for the first year (after one can unsubscribe), i.e 75 euro, I have had some tests of 1 million SNPs. I paid more for an urine test. Of course one must be interested on the medical field, even though the diagnosis is a work in progress, but they hit the mark. Relative finder is very good, having about 100000 persons tested and, even though I haven’t the relatives of Ashkenazim nor of the British, it is always a good experience. I discovered that my father and my mother were relatives even though they ignored it and the husband of my second cousin was a relative of mine even though we ignored it. By an American of Italian descent I have understood where my K1a1b1 came from, coming the ancestress of my grandmother from the Monti Pisani, a genetic mine I think. I’d say that, beyond the medical field, which should be the most important, also for genealogy 23andMe is good for a screening (the mtH* of my cousin and my father, the R1b1b2a of the husband of my cousin and his H6a1 etc.). An inconvenience is that very few reply to the Relative Finder invitation, and on this Family Finder is better, but they have very less persons tested.
Then for genealogy we must use FTDNA. Known that the husband of my cousin is R1b1b2a like me, I desire to know his STRs, and known that my wife my daughter and my son are K1c1*, probably with 16180T not known elsewhere, I desire to know their FGS. Last offer: 350 dollars= 245 euro. I am waiting anxiously the kits.
Today I have received the data of the father of my friend Grassi (H5/36: mutation 5471A, then, beyond the theories, Italian at least from many thousands of years) and I am waiting from an Italian American her R0a2: very important for my theories about the Etruscans who didn’t come from Asia Minor.
If I had labs, I used them. Not having them, I use those of the others, with a little expense.
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Maliclavelli


YDNA: R-S12460


MtDNA: K1a1b1e

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« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2011, 12:33:31 PM »

full genome mtDNA testing

Just one correction.  I believe they test only 1/8th of the mitochondrial genome (~2000/16000).  I may be wrong with the exact figure, but, unfortunately, I am certain it is not full genomic testing of the mtDNA. 

That said, as Maliclavelli outlined, what you get from testing with 23andMe is ordinarily worth the cost.  I manage seven profiles there.  Two for myself (v2 and v3), and five for family members.   
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Eldon
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« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2011, 12:36:17 PM »

I have been a participant in 23andMe for a long time and have used their Relative Finder extensively.  I have also used the Family Tree DNA Family Finder since it's inception.  
The Y-DNA data from 23andMe is limited.  If you simply want to know your Y haplogroup then they will tell you that but they don't help you find Y matches at all.  
23andMe do not do offer full genome testing of mtDNA.  23andMe does offer a lot of data about your autosomal chromosomes.  A lot of the people who test at 23andMe have no interest in their genealogy at all.  Family Tree DNA is genealogy centered so if you find an autosomal match with their Family Finder your match is much more likely to want to explore the match than the matches you find at 23andMe.  

Eldon
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Eldon
Y-DNA:  R1b1a2a1a1a4b1 (R1b-L148).
mtDNA:  H5a1
rms2
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« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2011, 04:53:16 PM »

Thank you all. I was under the false impression that 23andMe tested the whole mtDNA genome. Finding out that they do not has caused me to rethink my plans. I also do not like the subscription thing. When you buy from FTDNA you get full access for as long as FTDNA is around, without having to pay a subscription fee.

I have been thinking about testing for some of the recently discovered L21 SNPs. I am loath to spend a lot of money for negative results, which is why I haven't gone for the most recent Deep Clade upgrade. I also can't really see the point right now in having 111 str markers.

Ah, well . . .

I am kind of interested in DF23, since it is said to be between L21 and M222, but FTDNA is not offering that one yet. Of course, my haplotype isn't anything near "Niall"-like, but maybe that doesn't matter for DF23.

I really don't see any new SNPs that look likely to produce a positive result for me.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2011, 04:56:38 PM by rms2 » Logged

admixman
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« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2011, 01:03:55 PM »

I have tested with FTDNA, 23andMe, DNA Tribes, and DNA Consultants. I found that each has its own advantages. However, overall I think 23andMe gave by far the most information for the money. I think the decision is a function of what kind of information you are looking for. If you are looking for insight into your genetics for medical reasons, 23andMe is the clear choice.

23andMe is also very helpful if you are looking for clues to solve an unknown branch on your family tree that is within ~6 generations, especially if it is ethnically distinct. The features, which I have found very informative, are:

1. Ancestry Painting – This matches strands of your DNA on all of your chromosomes, except the Y-chromosome, to several reference populations, to determine if it comes from Europe, Asia, or Africa. Native American is deemed to be a mixture of Asian and European, the majority being Asian. The results are shown graphically in their relative positions on each chromosome.

2. Ancestry Finder – This graphically shows your chromosomes and the locations of matches of your DNA strands to other customers in the 23andMe database, based on the birthplaces of their grandparents. If all 4 grandparents come from the same country and the DNA strand is of significant length, it is very helpful for giving direction to your ancestral research.

3. Haplogroup Mutation Tree Mapper – This lists your haplogroup(s) and all the defining mutations in a very clear format, showing the SNP id, its popular designation (e.g. L21), your SNP call, the ancestral allele, and the derived allele. 23andMe does not sequence the entire mitochondrial DNA, but it does examine all the differences from the revised Cambridge Reference Sequence in the D-Loop, which incorporates the HyperVariable Regions.

4. Download Raw Data – This allows you to download the raw data in a standardized format in a zipped file. By itself, this will not help most people, but you can easily analyze this data with other services. I did this with DNA Tribes and their SNP analysis. Whereas 23andMe compares your DNA strands against only three general populations (Europe, Asia, Africa), DNA Tribes compares them against many ethnic populations from around the world (173 when I did it). I think this will eventually be the most powerful ancestral research tool, as more populations are added to the SNP databases.

One of the things to realize when choosing 23andMe is that they do not give any STR data – Y-chromosome or autosomal.

I hope this is of help to those of you who are considering 23andMe. (Note: I am in no way connected to 23andMe, other than being a customer.)
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rms2
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« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2011, 01:25:44 PM »

Thanks, admixman. I've decided that, for now, I won't order 23andMe's test.

Maybe later.
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Arch Y.
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« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2011, 03:02:58 PM »

Wait for discounts. 23andMe doesn't really provide that much information when it comes to researching genealogy. For the health and medical aspect of it, I like it.
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Heber
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« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2011, 02:08:17 AM »

I would agree with most of the comments so far.
23andme test for 1 million SNPs. The Illumnia platform roadmap indicates the ability to test 2.5 million next year and 5 million the year after.
Someone indicated at a recent conference that the full Y Chrosomone was would be available soon, no date or price, however it would not be offered as a separate test.
This is the holy grail of testing as it would avoid the need to test for individual SNP as and when they are identified. A big challenge is no calls on the Y Chrosomone with 35% currently no calls.
I found Relative Finder, Ancestry Finder and Haplotree Mutation Mapper to be the most useful.
The ability to download genomes and excel spreadsheets allows a lot of third party analysis via Dienekers, Doug McDonall, GEDMatch etc. I found that plotting maps of Y chromosome for autosomal matches gave some useful insights into clustering of haplogroups in Europe.
23andme currently have a program, Roots in the Future, to give away 10,000 Tests to people of African heritage in order to do research into health issues for that community.
23andme tend to prioritise Health over Ancestry, however the Ancestry community is vocal and active.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2011, 08:10:53 AM by Heber » Logged

Heber


 
R1b1a2a1a1b4  L459+ L21+ DF21+ DF13+ U198- U106- P66- P314.2- M37- M222- L96- L513- L48- L44- L4- L226- L2- L196- L195- L193- L192.1- L176.2- L165- L159.2- L148- L144- L130- L1-
Paternal L21* DF21


Maternal H1C1



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