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Seán MacGorman Powell
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« on: January 19, 2009, 06:27:19 PM »

My name is Sean MacGorman Powell, and I would like to welcome you to the X-chromosome (X DNA) Forum.  This forum is for any topics related to X chromosome testing, data analysis, and general discussion on any matters pertaining to that chromosome.

I am formally trained in evolutionary biology, population biology, wildlife biology, and mammalogy.  With respect to genetic genealogy, I am just an enthusiastic amateur, though I have found that a lot of my interests in this hobby overlap with my formal training, so feel free to ask me and the other participants any questions that you may have on this board (I also welcome private messages) and if I can't answer, then somebody here can probably refer you to somebody who can.  I encourage those of you with specific expertise and/or research interests in this field to introduce yourselves as well.

There is an X-chromosome Project associated with this forum, which can be accessed at the following URL:

http://www.worldfamilies.net/geo/xdna/

This project is currently under construction, so there is not much to see there as of yet, but shortly it will include spreadsheets for which people can submit and compare X DNA data for specific sequences (haploblocks) of interest.  These blocks are discovered largely through the efforts of dedicated amateur genetic genealogists, and you can all play an important part in helping to advance this rapidly-developing field.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2009, 05:02:21 PM by GhostX » Logged

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Terry Barton
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« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2009, 08:43:47 PM »

We're glad to have Sean as Moderator of the X-chromosome Board.  Feel free to start a new topic or to ask your question(s).  I hope this is a help to X DNA researchers.

Terry
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« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2009, 09:01:49 PM »


Hi Sean
I hope that I am in the correct place/group..David Faux had said there would be a group or Forum starting.
I am normally at the FTDNA Forums ( Kathleen Carrow) but seems that once upon a time I signed in here also as Kathlingram( also me) as there was a J2 message waiting for me from long long ago.
I have done my mtFGS and most of my X markers and more than 21 autosomal markers.I also have a couple of matches on my X haploblock at Tom Krahn's site..Some of us at FTDNA did our X hapoblocks and the X STRS as soon as they were available there.
My X haploblock matches are a bit slow getting back to me but two of them have more markers of other family member's now being processed at FTDNA..

Also interestingly enough to me..my closest match on my J2b FGS ( he has 1 extra HVRI mutation) has shared his sisters' X markers with me..they, I and my own sister match up amazingly close. We share an origin place and time for our J2b ancestor of Cork Ireland  ( 1837-1841)and likely around Bantry Bay which was my first clue to my Margaret Lynch's Cork birthplace
So I sure believe in plugging away at it..

I am considering doing a full genome for the SNPS but that will not be immediate.
I am a non-scientist for sure but my graduate degree in anthropology helps me to follow the geographic focus of it.. I am now retired ( Social Worker-State of NJ) and llive in NC and this is a hobby.

Kathleen Carrow Ingram
Lower Delmarva/Carrow/Fant/Dugan/Remener surname groups
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Kathlingram

X chromosome ancestry % 62.50 Irish,Colonial Admixture of Eng/Irish/Welsh 37.50%.Father 25% Irish,25 % Colonial admix.Mother 37.50% Irish 12.50% Colonial Admix
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« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2009, 09:47:42 PM »

Hi Kathleen,

Yes, this is the place that David was referring to.

I do recognize you from the FTDNA forum, and you are most welcome here!  It's also great to have a trained anthropologist among us, and I appreciate you pointing out that you have a background in that field.

Thanks for saying hi, and I hope you have some success with your X-STR tests!

Sean
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« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2009, 10:52:32 PM »

Hi Kathleen,

Yes, this is the place that David was referring to.

I do recognize you from the FTDNA forum, and you are most welcome here!  It's also great to have a trained anthropologist among us, and I appreciate you pointing out that you have a background in that field.

Thanks for saying hi, and I hope you have some success with your X-STR tests!

Sean
Yes, I posted a link at the FTDNA Forum about our new group here.

I can personally attest that "GhostX" (which is how I knew him at DNA-Forums) is the perfect choice for moderating this forum.  I am very thankful that he chose to accept this assignment since I well recall that among the "regulars" at the latter location he consistently showed respect, consideration, and a great command of the subject matter.  I am looking forward to working with Sean and everyone here as this topic is rapidly becoming my new obsession. 

The timing is great.  Since I have the longest Y-DNA haplogroup category R1b1b2......4c1, have done the FGS mtDNA testing (all this for myself and numerous cousins) I am very pleased that X chromosome research has come along to keep me up until 2 am like last night while hot on the trail of something or other.  Having tested with decodeme and 23andme and having the resultant X data analyzed via a number of formulae and algorithms, it gives me a bit of a running start, thanks to Anders Palsen who identified my largest block (a 6.5 Mb match to a Xibo of Manchuria China).  Anders has helped me analyze it from every direction imaginable by comparing it to the 52 populations in the HGDP-CEPH panel (a term all will become very familiar with very soon).  So, thanks to the help I received I have traction here but my weakness is in using the programs such as PHASE and PLINK which is necessary to do a complete analysis of the chromosome (especially for women, who of course have two X chromosomes).  Hopefully Anders and others can assist because I am a fish out of water in certain areas.

As to academic background my doctorate is in Medical Sciences (Human Growth and Development), and I am a retired forensic psychologist.  My new retirement status gives me the time and energy (the later a tad more problematic since I crossed the age 60 barrier) to work on various projects in this fascinating new area of study.

I have an X Resource list and and X Fact sheet which I will post here once I get them spiffed up a bit.  Hopefully it will be a starting point (although I have tried to include every paper published on the subject), at least the references to the intro material may help in the beginning.

What we all have to do before we start along this path is to take the ancestry fan chart and see who is and who is not going to be found on our X.  This is one of the most difficult aspects to grasp and it takes time to fill out the charts from Jim Turner and Blaine Bettinger's website - but once it is done, then everything becomes clear such as why my uncle has only a 1/128 contribution of our Six Nations ancestor on the autosomes, but she, at least theoretically (thanks to recombination the range is large), made a 1/8 "donation" to his X (over 12% - and myself half that).  If I had any particular ancestor on Dad's side of the family who I had hoped to "see" on the X, well we are out of luck.  Everything comes from mother since I am a XY male (I have been karyotyped so have seen both chromosomes).

Enough for now (have to walk the dog), but it will be great to have "our own spot" to compare notes and share information.

David K. Faux.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2009, 02:17:48 PM by DKF » Logged

X-chromosome:  56.25% England; 12.5% Scotland; 12.5% Ireland; 12.5% Germany; 6.25% North America (Lower Mohawk, Six Nations)
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« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2009, 12:02:33 AM »

Thanks for the warm welcome, David. 

I am of course well familiar with you from DNA-forums and from the Rootweb list, and I have great respect for the enthusiasm and thoroughness with which you pursue this field of study.  You'll be (and have been) a real asset to the project, and your professional scientific background obviously makes you well-qualified to analyze scientific data.

You mentioned that you were going to post your X Resource List and X Fact Sheet, but you may have missed that I had actually already taken the liberty of posting and stickying them on this forum earlier today (it was my first action as the new moderator!).  If you'd prefer that I remove them until you finish "spiffying them up," just say the word, but I think they look like they're in pretty great shape as they are.
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« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2009, 12:04:26 AM »

Will we be able to discuss SNP and STRs here?  I just received my 23andme kit, and so I will have that info in a few months I guess. But I'm also interested in the X STR and am considering ordering that test from FTDNA for my mom, my dad, my sister, my mom's brother, and myself. (Can't afford the 23andme for everyone!!)

Susan
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Dad: JAMES:  Ysearch QSCQ3;  R-P312, L21+ (R1b1b2a1b5*)
Dad: mitosearch QSCQ3; T1a; no matches HVR2 or FGS
Mom's brother: LEWTER: Ysearch FYFDA;  R-U106, L48+ (R1b1b2a1a*)
Mom's brother: mitosearch FYFDA, U5b2; 1 exac
Seán MacGorman Powell
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« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2009, 12:14:27 AM »

Will we be able to discuss SNP and STRs here?  I just received my 23andme kit, and so I will have that info in a few months I guess. But I'm also interested in the X STR and am considering ordering that test from FTDNA for my mom, my dad, my sister, my mom's brother, and myself. (Can't afford the 23andme for everyone!!)

Susan

Absolutely, Susan.  Any SNPs and STRs present on the X chromosome (and any other topics pertaining to that chromosome) are fair discussion topics for this forum, and we would very much welcome your participation.
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« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2009, 12:19:40 AM »

Great! Well I'll just read everyone else's postings for now, until I have some data to contribute. I'm not really into science, statistics, etc. so I'm sure I will be asking lots of questions and hopefully you all can help me! Thanks for starting this forum. I still subscribe to the other one as well, and have seen your postings there.
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Dad: JAMES:  Ysearch QSCQ3;  R-P312, L21+ (R1b1b2a1b5*)
Dad: mitosearch QSCQ3; T1a; no matches HVR2 or FGS
Mom's brother: LEWTER: Ysearch FYFDA;  R-U106, L48+ (R1b1b2a1a*)
Mom's brother: mitosearch FYFDA, U5b2; 1 exac
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« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2009, 01:35:15 AM »

One question.  Do the number identifiers for Testee ID equal those that some of us were already given at dna-forums from Ben's list?

Thanks in advance.
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I1*-AS, Kittler = DYS385a/b = 14/13 Hi/Lo [AS modality]. M170+ M253+ M258+ M307+ P19+ P30+ P38+ M161- M21- M223- M227- M26- M72- P109- P259- P37.2- Find me at 23andMe; I'm L22- [rs34626372 A] "ancestral". 
U5b2 with FGS and GenBank published, with an exact FGS match.
100% Ethnic Finn 500+ years.
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« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2009, 02:23:33 AM »

One question.  Do the number identifiers for Testee ID equal those that some of us were already given at dna-forums from Ben's list?

Thanks in advance.

No they don't, I had to number the columns that way to get the labels to fit in the top row, so I made a legend showing which Testee ID goes with which person (if anybody can think of a better way to display this, I'd be happy to hear your thoughts). 

I was actually just writing up a description of that results page as you were posting that question--see here:

http://www.worldfamilies.net/forum/index.php?topic=8437.0

You have to use the horizontal scroll bar on the bottom of the spreadsheet frame to see the legend.  I could just as easily move the legend to the bottom of the spreadsheet if people prefer (just let me know), but this spreadsheet is going to end up getting pretty long, so I'm not sure which way works best.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2009, 02:26:47 AM by xdnaadmin » Logged

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« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2009, 03:44:00 AM »

You mentioned that you were going to post your X Resource List and X Fact Sheet, but you may have missed that I had actually already taken the liberty of posting and stickying them on this forum earlier today (it was my first action as the new moderator!).  If you'd prefer that I remove them until you finish "spiffying them up," just say the word, but I think they look like they're in pretty great shape as they are.
Posting both is fine GhostX.  I do feel just a wee bit embarassed since they are a bit of a hotch potch (sp?) at present, but I guess they will do fine until I can organize both items in a less "intimidating" and more clear cut way.
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X-chromosome:  56.25% England; 12.5% Scotland; 12.5% Ireland; 12.5% Germany; 6.25% North America (Lower Mohawk, Six Nations)
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« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2009, 08:44:58 AM »

Posting both is fine GhostX.  I do feel just a wee bit embarassed since they are a bit of a hotch potch (sp?) at present, but I guess they will do fine until I can organize both items in a less "intimidating" and more clear cut way.

Okay, thanks David.  It occurs to me now that I should have asked you before posting them, but since you had already made them publicly available elsewhere, I didn't think you would mind.  :-)

Sean
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« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2009, 08:50:09 AM »

I hope people don't get confused by my posting under two different forum handles.  I have to use different logins to access different functions here (a quirk of the present website coding), and apparently sometimes I forget to witch to my GhostX handle before posting here.

You can all just call me Sean.

Sean MacGorman Powell
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« Reply #14 on: January 20, 2009, 10:55:21 AM »

Hi All,

I am Tomcat, here, at DNA Forums, and FTDNA forums.

I am considering a genome scan altho money is sooo tight. But I did 5 siblings' X STR's and was able to get a paternal haploblock and 2 maternal haploblocks for the DXS10074, 75, 79 linked markers. Those results are posted at DNAF Xmatch under Perkarsky-Zacun and Dorothee. The maternal blocks, under Dorothee, may or may not be congruent with maternal MtDNA haplo C1c, Native American with an (evidently) Upper Midwest origin. My autosomals are posted on Amatch under 6016.60 although I have 15-marker results for all 7 siblings. Post me if interested.

Any thoughts about the realtive merits of 2 genome scan options? I am, of course inclined to the less expensive, as I hope to do myself and 2 sisters in an attempt to turn-up the 2 maternal blocks co-extensive with the linked X STR's.

Thank you,
Tom
« Last Edit: January 20, 2009, 02:22:27 PM by GhostX » Logged

Paternal X: 100% Ukrainian Ashkenazi. Maternal X: 50% Upper Midwest Native American, 50% European.
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« Reply #15 on: January 20, 2009, 02:04:59 PM »

Any thoughts about the realtive merits of 2 genome scan options? I am, of course inclined to the less expensive, as I hope to do myself and 2 sisters in an attempt to turn-up the 2 maternal blocks co-extensive with the linked X STR's.

Yes, I have plenty of thoughts tomcat, and basically all of them keep bringing me back to the same place - the fence. 

Each scan has its advantages and disadvantages.  Until 23andme paint the X, and offer some sort of browser that would allow a more in depth look at the data, I am not wild about their offering at this time.

Decodeme offers twice as many SNPs (size does matter in this realm, at least within certain parameters).  It also has a browser where I can examine my data down to the most minute level and observe where the genes are in relation to the SNPs and block off a region of interest for closer inspection and compare myself to individuals from each of the 52 reference groups.  23andme is not even close here.  If we were talking about the Y chromosome then everything would be reversed - I would go for the 23andme offering since it contains so many novel SNPs (it is how I learned that I am not only U152, but also L2 and L20 - that all comes from 23andme and was later developed by FTDNA and EA both of which confirmed my 23andme findings). 

Still, back to the X.  I want to test my uncle but am humming and hawing as to which company to use.  Now that decodeme also offers the feature where they place your genome within a very specific area of the world (I am in NW France until they obtain some English, German and Norwegian samples to include), I am looking back at this option since their offering is so much more sophisticated for advanced research.

It occurs that this posting would be better suited to a subforum and thread relating to each company involved in X testing and as far as I know this would be decodeme, 23andme and FTDNA.
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X-chromosome:  56.25% England; 12.5% Scotland; 12.5% Ireland; 12.5% Germany; 6.25% North America (Lower Mohawk, Six Nations)
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« Reply #16 on: January 20, 2009, 02:29:23 PM »

It occurs that this posting would be better suited to a subforum and thread relating to each company involved in X testing and as far as I know this would be decodeme, 23andme and FTDNA.

I just tried to do that, but apparently the functionality of moving posts to a new thread in the same forum is not available to me as a moderator.

Feel free to start a new topic where this issue can be discussed, and you can quote the relevant post(s) there.
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« Reply #17 on: January 20, 2009, 03:22:40 PM »

DKF,

On concrete terms, how many more X SNP's does one get from DeCode vs. 23&me? Are DeCode X SNP's more informative than 23's? Or does DeCode cover areas of the X that are important? Which of the companies has all the CEPH SNP's covered?
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Paternal X: 100% Ukrainian Ashkenazi. Maternal X: 50% Upper Midwest Native American, 50% European.
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« Reply #18 on: January 20, 2009, 03:26:39 PM »

DKF,

On concrete terms, how many more X SNP's does one get from DeCode vs. 23&me? Are DeCode X SNP's more informative than 23's? Or does DeCode cover areas of the X that are important? Which of the companies has all the CEPH SNP's covered?

deCODEme matches 657k of the current HGDP-CEPH markers, 23andme probably less than 550k. If they are more informative I do not know and need to be tested.
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« Reply #19 on: January 20, 2009, 04:20:40 PM »

Hi Kathleen,


I do recognize you from the FTDNA forum, and you are most welcome here!  It's also great to have a trained anthropologist among us, and I appreciate you pointing out that you have a background in that field.

Sean

I should amend my post in that my focus was Cultural Anthropology..just in THEORY I understand geographical migrations but do think it very very cool ..

Tomcat had a good idea to give you his identifiers of his X markers and atMarkers  at DNA-FP..mine are as follows:
kathlingram ( me), kathlingram2 ( Sister), Jamingram( hubby),carrowD ( Carrow distant relative), jamingram3 ( Cousin) Billcarrow (what I deduce my Dad's to be)
Kathleen (Carrow) Ingram
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Kathlingram

X chromosome ancestry % 62.50 Irish,Colonial Admixture of Eng/Irish/Welsh 37.50%.Father 25% Irish,25 % Colonial admix.Mother 37.50% Irish 12.50% Colonial Admix
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« Reply #20 on: January 20, 2009, 07:46:36 PM »

DKF,

On concrete terms, how many more X SNP's does one get from DeCode vs. 23&me? Are DeCode X SNP's more informative than 23's? Or does DeCode cover areas of the X that are important? Which of the companies has all the CEPH SNP's covered?

More specific statistics about how many markers can be used from the HGDP-CEPH dataset.

HGDP 644k HGDP-CEPH autosmal markers
HGDP 16K HGDP-CEPH x-markers

Of these deCODEme can use:

641k autosomal markers
16k x-markers

And 23andme can use:

538k autosomal markers
13k x-markers

Estimate some thousand markers reduction on all because of bad quality SNP.
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« Reply #21 on: January 24, 2009, 03:46:11 PM »

My name is Sean MacGorman Powell, and I would like to welcome you to the X-chromosome (X DNA) Forum.  This forum is for any topics related to X chromosome testing, data analysis, and general discussion on any matters pertaining to that chromosome.

I am formally trained in evolutionary biology, population biology, wildlife biology, and mammalogy.  With respect to genetic genealogy, I am just an enthusiastic amateur, though I have found that a lot of my interests in this hobby overlap with my formal training, so feel free to ask me and the other participants any questions that you may have on this board (I also welcome private messages) and if I can't answer, then somebody here can probably refer you to somebody who can.  I encourage those of you with specific expertise and/or research interests in this field to introduce yourselves as well.

There is an X-chromosome Project associated with this forum, which can be accessed at the following URL:

http://www.worldfamilies.net/geo/xdna/

This project is currently under construction, so there is not much to see there as of yet, but shortly it will include spreadsheets for which people can submit and compare X DNA data for specific sequences (haploblocks) of interest.  These blocks are discovered largely through the efforts of dedicated amateur genetic genealogists, and you can all play an important part in helping to advance this rapidly-developing field.

Thank you, Sean for stepping up to the plate to be the moderator of this new forum!  I met GhostX over at the DNA-Forums.  My background is in the medical field but I have to dust off the cobwebs in my brain to understand all the new basic science research that has taken place in recent years. I was passionate about genealogy until DNA was added to the mix so that has opened up a whole new world of interests.  Not only do we have to know genetic genealogy but now we have to learn population genetics, history, anthropology,  archaeology to name a few. Every time I turn around there is something new to learn.  I am hoping we can teach each other about the X chromosome because I believe it offers unique information about our pedigrees and it is also the gateway to studying the autosomes. 

The X chromosome is really like the Y chromosome but it represents many ancestors divided into blocks. I learned at DNA-Forums that I match someone from Finland in one block, someone from France in another block etc. and there is a homozygous match in which both my parents’ X chromosomes have a matching block that appears to be present in Africans but not likely to be found in Asia.  I only knew about my British Isles, German and Dutch ancestry.  It certainly makes you appreciate that we are all related to each other.  I wonder what each of these X-Eves or X-Adams were doing thousands of years ago and how did they all get mixed up in my X chromosomes?  Who were these ancient peoples and what were their migration patterns?

We certainly hope that through comparing our DNA with others we can use the information to discover more recent family ties.  I think we will need STR information as well as SNP information to be able to find the subclades within the blocks.
Happy Hunting,

Kathy J.
AKA Kathy Johnston
AKA geneticgenie (a username chosen for this forum a few years ago so I apologize if it resembles any other names or organizations)


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Kathy J.
X Chromosomes: 75% English, 12.5% German, 6.25% Dutch, 3.125% Irish, 3.125% Scottish;
from Father's X: 43.75% English, 6.25% Dutch;
from Mother's X: 31.25% English, 12.5% German, 3.125% Irish, 3.125% Scottish
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« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2009, 06:48:34 PM »

Thank you, Sean for stepping up to the plate to be the moderator of this new forum!  I met GhostX over at the DNA-Forums.  My background is in the medical field but I have to dust off the cobwebs in my brain to understand all the new basic science research that has taken place in recent years. I was passionate about genealogy until DNA was added to the mix so that has opened up a whole new world of interests.  Not only do we have to know genetic genealogy but now we have to learn population genetics, history, anthropology,  archaeology to name a few. Every time I turn around there is something new to learn.  I am hoping we can teach each other about the X chromosome because I believe it offers unique information about our pedigrees and it is also the gateway to studying the autosomes. 

The X chromosome is really like the Y chromosome but it represents many ancestors divided into blocks. I learned at DNA-Forums that I match someone from Finland in one block, someone from France in another block etc. and there is a homozygous match in which both my parents’ X chromosomes have a matching block that appears to be present in Africans but not likely to be found in Asia.  I only knew about my British Isles, German and Dutch ancestry.  It certainly makes you appreciate that we are all related to each other.  I wonder what each of these X-Eves or X-Adams were doing thousands of years ago and how did they all get mixed up in my X chromosomes?  Who were these ancient peoples and what were their migration patterns?

We certainly hope that through comparing our DNA with others we can use the information to discover more recent family ties.  I think we will need STR information as well as SNP information to be able to find the subclades within the blocks.
Happy Hunting,

Kathy J.
AKA Kathy Johnston
AKA geneticgenie (a username chosen for this forum a few years ago so I apologize if it resembles any other names or organizations)


You're most welcome, Kathy, and thank you for introducing yourself here. 

The X-DNA community is already very well-acquainted with Kathy on other forums, and she deserves a great deal of the credit for getting the ball rolling with getting people to share their X-SNP haploblocks (you'll note her name listed as the identifier of some of the haploblocks on the project results page).  Were it not for her encouraging prodding, I wouldn't have taken on the administration of this project.
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« Reply #23 on: January 25, 2009, 02:46:56 AM »

Quote
You're most welcome, Kathy, and thank you for introducing yourself here. 

The X-DNA community is already very well-acquainted with Kathy on other forums, and she deserves a great deal of the credit for getting the ball rolling with getting people to share their X-SNP haploblocks (you'll note her name listed as the identifier of some of the haploblocks on the project results page).  Were it not for her encouraging prodding, I wouldn't have taken on the administration of this project.
Yes, it was Anders Palsen and Kathy who really kick started this area of study.  I am not sure that most of us would be anything more than vaguely aware of what promise the X holds had it not been for the persistent efforts of both to push forward this work.  I am very thankful as, via studying the X chromosome for only a couple of months, I have already learned almost as much as years of delving into Y-DNA and mtDNA.  The allure, at least for me, is that there is an opportunity to explore different levels of ancestry from "Out of Africa" to Colonial times in the Americas.  I get to actually "see" my ancestors DNA sequences and compare them to others - great fun and learning.
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X-chromosome:  56.25% England; 12.5% Scotland; 12.5% Ireland; 12.5% Germany; 6.25% North America (Lower Mohawk, Six Nations)
Svaale
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« Reply #24 on: January 27, 2009, 09:50:26 AM »

Thanks for the credit David. I begun officially fishing in the X-SNP pool by posting my first X-SNP related question to the Rootsweb DNA list without the great response in early May 08, only Ann Turner was helpful answering some of my initial basic questions:

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GENEALOGY-DNA/2008-05/1209757405

Later I manage to accumale much enough knowledge and data to present a method for extracting worldwide population data for personal comparisment. No comments from the list.

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/genealogy-dna/2008-05/1211914534

Then soon after due to the lack of comments I thought it may help to present a practical application to fish for more interest on the list by presenting the first Native American X-SNP haploblock. The response from the public was not great, again only Ann Turner appears to have understod the post and commented on it as she did some research on this on family related basis. In this case there was no response from the list that in other cases tend to be dominated by "strong personalitites" or as I sometimes call them "the list Gods", I would expect to be eaten alive because of this post but nothing happend.

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/genealogy-dna/2008-05/1211921325

I understod then maybe I should offer to the public a free analysis so people could get a practical approach using their own DNA information (the first block party), this appeared to help on the interest, also Kathy was one of my "customers" here :)

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/genealogy-dna/2008-05/1211921325

Later on great thanks to Kathy enthusiasm spinnoff block parties sprang up at DNA forums increasing the interest to the public with new interesting blocks and findings posted especally for 23andme customers that again triggered others like GhostX later resultet in more block finding and the establishment of this forum, great thanks to GhostX who have taken the responsibility as administrator for the forum and the block data, and so now are we all here :)
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