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Author Topic: Have you found evidence of a "non-paternity event" through DNA?  (Read 2310 times)
Marilyn Teaff Barton
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« on: June 25, 2006, 10:39:00 PM »

Non-paternity results did occur and they may be obvious through DNA testing when the result is being compared in a well-documented family.?
There are several scenarios that fit into the category of non-paternity event.? One, of course, is infidelity, while another common event was the unrecorded adoption.? As there were many adult deaths on the frontier, children were frequently raised by relatives or friends, with the adoptive parents giving the child their own last name.? Where infidelities or adoptions have long been rumored and now proven, there can be some satisfaction.? Where an infidelity or adoption occurred in a well-documented family, identifying it helps in clarifying the DNA profile of descendants.? Where the non-paternity event occurs in a family without extensive documentation, it can be very disruptive and prevent the participant from obtaining matches within the surname.

Have you found such an event in your family, and how did you deal with it?

Post your comments here.? (Click the button marked "reply" at the bottom of this page to post)? ?Note: if you are signed in, you can come back later and edit, update, or even delete your original? posting.? Feel free to post as many times as you'd like
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alinvenice
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« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2006, 05:34:45 PM »

Funny you should ask.  My non-paternity event was something I discovered three years ago, although it's not juicy in the sense that one might expect when discovering that one's father is not, biologically speaking, one's father. 

In my instance I discovered that I had gone home with the wrong family at birth, a mistake that was never corrected and remained secret from me until the ripe (metaphorically speaking) old age of fifty.  I am now hard at work on a memoir that has come about as a result of that little tidbit of information coming to light.  In that context I googled free dna databases, and I eventually got here. 

I guess you could say I had a "non-paternity, non-maternity" event.

Questions?  :)

Al
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« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2006, 02:10:33 AM »

The Nolan DNA Surname project has found a "non-paternity event". Our N-2 member is quite probably related to the Osmond family surname from 468 years in the past.

FAMILY III.

Conclusions:

Primary: The family of N-2, William John Nolan, is probably descended from the Ozment (Osmond) surname through the Famille de NOLLENT of France. N-2 matched 33 of 37 markers with the Ozment (Osmond) surname meaning that they are probably related. There are many explanations for this result with the most common answer being a second marriage for Marguerite Osmond and her child from a previous relationship using the name Nolan. "Were the surnames interconnected? For example, did a Mr. Osmond Nolan have male offspring surnamed Osmond around 1156 to 1556?

M.R.C.A. -- 450 years = 74.65%, 550 years = 89.81%, 650 years = 79.39%, 750 years = 91.47%, 850 years = 96.82% (if not related within 10 generations)."

The following marriage of Marguerite Osmond to Richard de Nollent falls within the (MRCA) Most Recent Common Ancestor estimate listed above: 2006 minus 1538 equals 468 years. This is most likely the relationship connection between the Nolan (Nollent) and Ozment (Osmond) families that bind these two surnames together.

Richard de NOLLENT, seigneur de Saint-Cyr, de Chanday et de M?licourt, fils de Gilles de NOLLENT et de Jeanne de MELICOURT. x 10-8-1538 Marguerite OSMOND.

Child: Richard de NOLLENT.

Richard de NOLLENT (+1517) seigneur de Saint-Cyr, de Chanday et de M?licourt, fils de Richard de NOLLENT et de Marguerite OSMOND x 9-10-1566 H?l?ne de LISLE.

Children: Richard de NOLLENT, seigneur de Sainr Cyr.

Fran?oise de NOLLENT x Philippe LE SENS, seigneur de Morsant.

Pierre de NOLLENT, seigneur de Chanday.

Jean de NOLLENT.

Marguerite de NOLLENT x 11-3-1613 Pierre de BARRE, seigneur des Authieux.

Fran?ois de NOLLENT (+ 1619).


Glenn Allen Nolen
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« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2007, 02:47:53 PM »

DNA evidence of N-4 from the Nolan DNA Surname Project Lineage II and Kit #56134 from the Windham Family DNA Project give a high probability of a common ancestor through an extramarital event or adoption based on the following information: 

1. Edward MacLysaght established that the O'Mulgeehy, O Maolghaoithe, McSwyne, Sweeney family of Ireland became Wynne or Windham.

2. The 33 of 37 Y-DNA marker match between N-4 of the Nolan DNA Surname Project and Kit #56134 from the Windham Family DNA Project have three possible points of occurrence: 1. In 1574, both families owned castles in Galway, Co. Ireland and would have socialized together; 2. Both represent Herenagh Families of Donegal Co. Ireland. Herenagh meaning land typically converted into donated church property; and 3. Both families were represented in the early history of Isle of Wight Co. VA in the early 1640's.
 
NOLAN - WINDHAM
PROBABILITY & TIME TO MOST RECENT COMMON ANCESTOR.


96.81% Probability of a Shared Common Ancestor within 24 Generations:

24 generations multiplied by 15 (Years in a Generation) = 360 years.
24 generations multiplied by 25 (Years in a Generation) = 600 years.
91.44% Probability of a Shared Common Ancestor within 20 Generations:

20 generations multiplied by 15 (Years in a Generation) = 300 years.
20 generations multiplied by 25 (Years in a Generation) = 500 years.
2006 minus 1597* = 409 Years.

2006 minus 1643* = 363 Years.

 

* 1597 - THOMAS NOLAN purchased Enniscrone Castle Co. Sligo.

* 1643 - JOHN NOWLIN living in Isle of Wight Co. VA.

 

Evidence:

1. Mc Swyne castle owners in the Barony of Clare Co. Galway at the same time Nolan Lineage II owns a castle, the Barony of Moycullen Co. Galway which included the town of Galway. 

JOURNAL OF THE GALWAY ARCHÆOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY JGAHS Vol. I (1900–1901), No. i, Nolan, J. P.: The Castles of Clare Barony [The thirty-four De Burgo Castles in the Barony of Clare], 11-48.

P. 14

"The most Irish names amongst the Clare castle owners are O'Heine (Hynes) and two MacSwynes (Sweeney), faithful adherents of Clanricarde."

JOURNAL OF THE GALWAY ARCHÆOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY JGAHS Vol. I (1900–1901), No. ii, Nolan, J. P.: Galway Castles and Owners in 1574, 109-123.

P. 114

The Baronie of Mvykullen*

Qwarown browne    Donell Oge Ohologhan (Nolan)

* * (including the Barony of Galway.-t.)

P. 118

The Boronie of Clare

Kyliskiegh      Murrough McSwyne               

Cahirnefieke   Tirlagh Caragh Mc Swyne

 
2. Clandaholka and Mevaugh Parish are adjacent to each other in Co. Donegal Ireland.
 

PATENT ROLLS OF JAMES I: INQUISITION AT LIFFORD, 1609.


"Clandaholka Parish.



Herenagh O'MULGEEGH; the O'Boile's; the McSwyne's; or freeholds: Clandaholka parish, containing 9 ballibetaghs whereof the herenagh O'MULGEEGH has 1 qr., who pays to the bishop of Raphoe 13s 4d Ir. rent, and 1l 13s 4d Ir. pension out of the bishop's thirds of the tithes, the bishop hass 1/3 qr. called Marfaugh, anciently inhabited by the sept of the O'Boile's, for which 4s rent is paid, the McSwyne's paid them a cosherie of 4 madders of butter and 8 madders of meal, whereof nothing has been paid in the time of the present bishop, about 3 miles from the church is a ruined chapel with 7 gorts of free land called Clonveg, the tenants of which paid 2s 4d yearly to the parson of Clondaholka in this parish, the parson, vicar, tithes and repairs are as in Faughan parish, the parson and vicar pay 8s Ir. proxies to the bishop and have 4 gorts of glebe between them, there are also 2 qrs. belonging to the late abbey of BallymcSwyne Odie besides Doe castle, the tithes and spirituallities of which are divided between the parishes of Clondaholka and Kilmacrenan;



Mevaugh Parish.



Herenagh the sept of the O'NOLAN'S; or freeholds: Mevaugh parish, containing 5 baalibetaghs, of which 1 qr. are church land enjoyed by the sept of the O'NOLAN'S, as herenaghs, who pay to the bishop of Raphoe 13s 4d Ir. and 1l Ir. pension out of the bishop's third of the tithes, the parson, vicar, tithes and repairs are as in Faughan parish, the parson and vicar pay 3s proxies each to the bishop, and have 2 gorts of glebe land between them, in this parish are 6 gorts of free land called Kinelargie, the proprietors of which paid 2s yearly to the official of Raphoe, there is also a chapel with 1/2 qr. of land called Druin which belonged to the Franciscan friars of Kilmacrenan who received 13s yearly out of it, the McSwyne's challenged a cosherie of 4 meathers of butter and 8 meathers of meal from it;"

3. John (Nolan) (Nowlin) living in Isle of Wight Co. Virginia, 1643.
 

Glenn Allen Nolen
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« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2007, 12:19:18 PM »

Further evidence in support of an extramarital event or adoption to Reply #3 posted on: January 06, 2007, 06:47:53 PM is a list of Cromwellian evictions for Co. Sligo, Ireland that include John Nolan and Edmond and Milmory McSwine.

http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/IRL-SLIGO/2000-11/0973202157

List of the people in Sligo that were evicted by Cromwell with no hope of getting either their land back or any land at all back. These were the people that Cromwell believed were the really bad Irish, although some appear to be Anglo-Normans. This has to be qualified as some of them may have been allowed to stay on as lessees on their
old land.

Teig ODowd of Roslea
Andrew Crean of Anagh
John, his son, Andrew his grandchild
Thirlagh McDonagh, Crivigh, Thirlagh his son
David Dowd of Castlemeen Infant
JOHN NOLAN of Iskerowen
Pall French of Sligo
Garratt Baxter of Laragh
Kedagh O Banaghan of Carigbanaghan
John French of Sligo
Teig O Conr {Connor?} Sligoe
Teig OHara of Balliara
Oliver O'Hara of Mallan
TEIG O HIGIN of Cooleraile
Farroll O Gara of Moygara
Bryan Fitz Teig O Conr [Connor?] [no place name]
Hugh McDonogh of Ballielly
Patt Plunkett of Belagrany
Charles O Conr [Connor?] of Glancarbry
Donogh O Conr [Connor?] of Glandanaire
William Crean of [no place name shown]
McDonogh of Cloonegassell
John McDonogh of Ramullin
Conr [Connor?] McDonogh of Carrowmore
William Dowd of Kinconalla
David Dowd of Lakan
EDMOND & MILMORY McSWINE of Ardneglas
Conr [Connor?] McDonogh of Corrindona
GILCOLLUM O HIGIN of Montagh


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« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2007, 12:06:59 PM »

Further DNA evidence in support of an extramarital event or adoption to Reply #3 posted on: January 06, 2007, 06:47:53 PM is a Windham - Nolan DNA comparison provided by John B. Windham of the Windham Family DNA Project that details a 25 Y-DNA marker match between N-3 and Kit # 18393 and a 61-62 of 67 Y-DNA marker match between Kit # 18393 and N-4 with a mismatch of 5 as listed by FTDNA.

These two families could possibly even be connected as early as circa 1400 through the grandsons that are said to belong to Mac Suibhne of Connacht and the Nolan’s of Galway who erected the tomb in the center of the Franciscan Friary churchyard in Galway, 1394.

Windham-Nolan DNA Comparison

N4   N3   18393   56134   67680

13   13   13   13   13
24   24   24   24   24
14   14   14   14   14
10   10   10   10   10
11   11   11   11   11
17   17   17   17   17
12   12   12   12   12
12   12   12   12   12
12   12   12   12   12
14   14   14   14   14
13   13   13   13   13
30   31   31   31   31

17   17   17   17   17
09   09   09   09   09
10   10   10   10   10
11   11   11   11   11
11   11   11   11   11
25   25   25   25   25
15   15   15   15   15
19   19   19   19   19
28   28   28   29   28
15   15   15   15   15
15   15   15   15   15
15   17   17   17   17
17   17   17   17   17

11   --   11   11   11
11   --   11   11   11
19   --   19   19   19
23   --   23   23   23
15   --   15   15   15
15   --   15   15   15
20   --   21   21   20
16   --   16   16   16
36   --   36   36   36
40   --   39   40   39
12   --   12   12   12
12   --   12   12   12

11   --   11   --   --
09   --   09   --   --
15   --   15   --   --
16   --   16   --   --
08   --   08   --   --
10   --   10   --   --
10   --   10   --   --
08   --   08   --   --
10   --   10   --   --
10   --   10   --   --
12   --   12   --   --
23   --   23   --   --
23   --   23   --   --
16   --   16   --   --
10   --   10   --   --
12   --   12   --   --
12   --   12   --   --
15   --   15   --   --
08   --   08   --   --
12   --   13   --   --
22   --   22   --   --
20   --   20   --   --
13   --   13   --   --
12   --   12   --   --
11   --   11   --   --
13   --   13   --   --
11   --   11   --   --
11   --   11   --   --
14   --   14   --   --
12   --   12   --   --

Glenn Allen Nolen
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« Last Edit: January 14, 2007, 05:55:57 PM by Nolan Admin - Glenn Allen Nolen » Logged
joeflood
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« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2007, 09:09:07 PM »

As soon as I was tested, we immediately found evidence of an extra-paternal event in our BLOOD, RUDDOCH and HITE lines.

The BLOOD line was found to be solid back to 1550 at least, because two matching Bloods could not have a common ancestor before that time (different continents). However, two Ruddock/Riddocks were carrying the Blood Y-signature unlike their "cousins" - and it had not been known how these two were related. 

The "event" most likely happened  in the southern US backwoods, maybe 1750-1800, and it seems possible that a BLOOD family was orphaned and adopted by other families - as HITEs are also involved from somewhere around the same time.

The Ruddochs are working hard to test a range of  proven cousins of their two problem members. At the moment, DNA is not helping much as all six BLOOD descendants have exactly two different 37-marker mutations from the modal ancestor ~ 1500, so we are not getting clear lines.
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