World Families Forums - An R1b1 sequence and surname data--have I found a Medieval social context?

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
July 24, 2014, 08:17:37 PM
Home Help Search Login Register

+  World Families Forums
|-+  General Forums - Note: You must Be Logged In to post. Anyone can browse.
| |-+  R1b General (Moderator: rms2)
| | |-+  An R1b1 sequence and surname data--have I found a Medieval social context?
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: An R1b1 sequence and surname data--have I found a Medieval social context?  (Read 3166 times)
JAFarris
New Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4


« on: June 09, 2006, 02:55:32 PM »

I am an R1b1 with little or nothing in the way of close matches (particularly within my surname), but if I look at the folks who have the most markers matched with me, there seems to be a bit of a pattern.  My surname, Farris, has two origins--one is as a Scottish or Irish patronymic, a variant on Fergus (and I do not match closely at all the people with my surname with this sort of identified heritage) and the other is as an occupational name derived from "farrier" (thus an allegedly southern English variant on Farrar). Of course, with occupational surnames, no relation with other people of the same surname can be assumed.   I have been tested to 37 markers, and the closest matches (about 27 markers or so) on ybase are prominently (eleven out of fifteen) English and mostly occupational (like Marshall, Parker, Cooper, Turner, etc...).  Of the other matches, three matches are with names of Celtic origin and one anomolous one is central European.  This would seem to me to suggest that my family might have its origins in a sort of tradesman and professional milieu in medieval England, perhaps in an urban or semi-urban setting.  Is this a good assumption?  The closest match to me, at 29 out of 37 markers has a different surname that also has a possible origin in the blacksmithing occupation.  With this genetic distance, is it possible that we are both  descended from a family of medieval smiths/farriers?  I just don't know if I am making too many assumptions on the evidence I've found in constructing this "historical social context" for geneological origins--if anyone has an opinion, please let me know.
Logged
Stevo
Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 11


« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2006, 10:10:58 AM »

Here is an idea you might want to try that seems to make sense. When searching for some hint of deep ancestry and geographic origins, go to YSEARCH and run only the 23 slow-mutating markers. Here they are, as identified by FTDNA:

DYS
393
390
19
391
426
388
389-I
392
389-2
459a
459b
455
454
447
437
448
460
gata H4
YCA IIa
YCA IIb
607
442
438

See what kinds of matches you get at a genetic distance of 2 and under. Count them by geographic origin and see if there is a pattern.

We had a lot of fun with this over on the FTDNA Forum where the idea was put forward by Rick in the thread, IF YOU ARE ONE, BE ONE.
Logged
Stevo
Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 11


« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2006, 10:07:12 AM »

JAFarris -

Have you tried what I suggested? If so, how did it work out?

(Man, this forum moves slowly!)
Logged
JAFarris
New Member
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4


« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2006, 02:38:30 PM »

Thanks for the tip--I haven't been able to check the forum in a while.  When I do it on Y-search, I only come up with one match within the perameters (must be that 15 at DYS 19/394).  The match is an English name, incidentally.  When I tried a slightly different version of  the same trick on SMGF.org I come up with a mix of a few English and North German names--hmm... maybe a I'm a Saxon R1b1c..... 
Logged
JohnRaciti
Guest
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2006, 05:14:00 AM »

I am currently conducting research of matching dna
members from the Nordic-Celtic project. I am also
trying to find similarities between these matching
members (which includes my own family) through
phenotypes and any other deep SNP relationships found
in the last 24 generations.


http://www.johnraciti.com.au/dna/dna_R1b.html


Best Regards,
John Caggegi-Raciti
Logged
Jim Cooke
Guest
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2006, 01:35:48 PM »

Here is an idea you might want to try that seems to make sense. When searching for some hint of deep ancestry and geographic origins, go to YSEARCH and run only the 23 slow-mutating markers. Here they are, as identified by FTDNA:

DYS
393
390
19
391
426
388
389-I
392
389-2
459a
459b
455
454
447
437
448
460
gata H4
YCA IIa
YCA IIb
607
442
438

See what kinds of matches you get at a genetic distance of 2 and under. Count them by geographic origin and see if there is a pattern.

We had a lot of fun with this over on the FTDNA Forum where the idea was put forward by Rick in the thread, IF YOU ARE ONE, BE ONE.

I tried this and, rather than finding matches with occupational surnames (I am a "Cooke") I found matches in the Dutch country. This seems to add to the confirmation that my markers are R1bSTR22, "Frisian Cluster", a Nordtvedt classification. The 2 matches were Clawson & Petersen. Also, they matched exactly on 2 of the 3 rare markers we have: 391 (12), 385a(10), & 385b(12 for me, 14 for Petersen & Clawson).
Logged
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


SEO light theme by © Mustang forums. Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC

Page created in 0.057 seconds with 17 queries.