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Author Topic: Why did you decide to do a surname project?  (Read 4430 times)
Marilyn Teaff Barton
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« on: May 13, 2006, 05:08:32 PM »

Whether you are a project administrator or have just joined a project, you are probably drawn to DNA testing as a new tool that will enhance your genealogy research.? Most people hope that the tests will confirm relationships that have been believed through traditional genealogy, locate related families lost through the passage of time, or identify the origin of the family's early ancestors. What brought you to a surname project?
Post your comments here.? (Click the button marked "reply" at the bottom of this page to post)? ?Note: if you are signed in, you can come back later and edit, update, or even delete your original? posting.? Feel free to post as many times as you'd like
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Paul_Sheats
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« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2006, 10:26:09 AM »

Hi Marilyn,

My main motivation for joining, testing and being co-admin for the Sheets project is my interest in finding out more about my Sheets surname, and how I tie in with those in the U.S.? ?My Sheets ancestors were in Canada, and I hit a brick wall there in the mid 1800's.? My suspicion is that my Sheets do connect earlier in time to the one's in the U.S., because the earliest Sheets in Ontario were United Empire Loyalists, who stayed loyal to the British throne in the times of the Revolutionary war, and many UEL's were in the states before moving to loyalist counties of Dundas, Stormont, and Glengarry in Ontario.? The earliest records of Sheets in Ontario were about 1782.? The earliest Sheets in the U.S. were in Pennsylvania and Maryland about 100 years prior, in the 1680's.? Legend has it that Johann Sheets came from Holland in 1682 as part of the second colonization of William Penn (this is from a book written in 1940, but it lists no sources of the information -- what a shame!).? My father always said his Sheets were Dutch, but now I'm wondering if they were German.? ?

So I guess, like some others, I'm hoping to unravel these mysteries of origin and spelling variations via DNA testing, and to find clues for my brick wall paper trail.

« Last Edit: May 14, 2006, 10:30:37 AM by Paul_Sheats » Logged
LewisHart
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« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2006, 05:15:52 PM »

My primary reason for starting a surname Project was that I wanted to identify the origins of my Hart family ancestors. I wanted to join a Hart surname project, but one wasn't available. I was encouraged by some of the members of the DNA-Genealogy website to become an administrator. So, I took the challenge. Growing up I was told I was English and Irish. Traditional genealogy could only give me clues on my ethnic background. I realized that being an administrator I could also help other Harts to search for their ancestors. With DNA testing I could also help to bring the various Hart groups together. I found that all Harts are not related, at least in a genealogical time frame.
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gstrickland
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« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2006, 03:50:11 PM »

I wanted to see if what I had been told was correct and to see if we could get a more-definite reading on our Strickland ancestors prior to Solomon and Amy Pace. That is as far back as the SMC bible takes us, although information via the Internet and the Mormon church both put us in the lines of Matthew Sr. and Matthew Jr., as well as to Jacob Strickland and Roger Strickland (born 1588 in Cartmellfell, Westmorland County, England). I am probably four to five weeks away from getting definitive answers back, although a cousin who knows about the DNA projects tells me I will start getting some answers within two weeks.
GStrickland
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southofthenorth
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« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2006, 11:02:11 AM »

I decided to do the testing because I could only trace my father's family back two generations on his father's side.
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Claire_T
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« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2006, 11:34:41 PM »

My surname is Toynbee, which is relatively rare, but I've been very conscious of its most famous members since childhood when new teachers would ask if I was any relationship to the historian Arnold J. Toynbee. Fifty years later, the only answer I have is still: "Maybe."

The Toynbee surname originated in Lincolnshire, and I've been told that many Toynbees emigrated - from Lincolnshire, anyhow - in the 18th century. Unfortunately I've hit a documentation brick wall around 1798 when my great-great-great-grandfather William Toynbee was born, reportedly in Woolwich Kent [1861 census report] - I haven't yet found his family, or a parish record of his christening. William raised his children in London Islington, where he worked as a tailor, and he lived till 1864, but I haven't heard any family stories that go back that far and neither have my London cousins.

It appears, though, that the Toynbees known from parish records can be fitted on to a family tree that goes back to a single common male ancestor named William Toynbee who lived in Waddington (about 4 miles south of Lincoln city center) and was born before 1574. The proposed place for our William on this tree would make Arnold J. Toynbee something like my grandfather's 12th cousin. Wouldn't it be great to confirm that there is (most likely) a single male lineage!

Clearly Toynbee comes from a placename - the common Old Norse suffix -by indicates a farmstead or settlement. Waddington is about 12 miles cross-country from the nearest surviving places thought to be connected with our surname - High Toynton and Low Toynton near Horncastle, and Tumby and Tumby Woodside south-southwest of Horncastle. And we think there are some spelling variants from earlier times, other places.

The strangest spelling variant is offered by FamilySearch.org - with exact spelling off, a search for William Toynbee brings up William Taughenbaugh and William Taughinbaugh in 19th-century Indiana and Pennsylvania. That would be an interesting cross-match.
 
I have been watching the Sinclair project, which has over 50 male participants and is showing some interesting results. With a lot of similar questions about Toynbees, I recently decided to start a Toynbee Surname Project. 
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jkent3000
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« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2006, 12:27:52 PM »

I had reached a brick wall with my Thomas line.  My brother agreed to have his DNA done.  We received one match. Our pedigree charts do not match except the given name of his first ancestor. We have to do some serious research.
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Donnie
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« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2006, 11:13:45 PM »

I have been looking for a common thread to connect my Porter line back to its American origin for years. I have been at a "brick wall" at my 4th ggrandfather for years. My 3rd ggrandfather wrote that his grandfather was of English origin, that he was born in Boston MA, and fought the last three years of the Revolution as a Continental soldier. In the 1880 census someone in the household told the census taker that my ancestor in question was born in Canada. I have searched for a "conventional" match for too many years and joining the Porter Y-DNA Project is another effort to pinpoint my line and work both ends toward the middle. The second reason for this is, well...I'm just curious and inquisitive!
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