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Author Topic: CASTLEHILL ARDKEEN SAVAGE CLINT/McALINDEN THE ORIEL SEPT Mac Giolla Fhiondain  (Read 2549 times)
Lena McVea
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« on: October 21, 2012, 07:39:47 AM »

THIS IS A JOINT EFFORT BY MARY & MYSELF TO TRY TO TELL THE HISTORY OF THE CLINT FAMILY OF ARDKEEN/CASTLEBOY. WE ARE BOTH WORKING THROUGH A LOT OF ANCIENT BOOKS TO SEE HOW WE CAN CORRECTLY TELL THE EARLY STORY.

CASTLE HILL was formally an ancient Celtic hill fort. It is a beautiful place known as the Dorn [the haft of the sword] because of the way Standford Lough or Lake Cuan; as it was referred to in olden days, protected three sides. The view from the top of the old earthworks is breathtaking; one can see all over the west side of the peninsula from Bishop-mills up to Scrabo Tower sitting high on the old bronze/iron age fort on the hill at the end of the lough at Newtownards.

On the south side of the hill lies the ruins of St. Mary's old church, now roofless, but the walls still standing to roof height. An older church was believed to have been there before the Savages. Around the ruins is an ancient burying ground enclosed by later stone walls. An old Norman headstone, depicting a knight because of the sword carved  on it, can still be seen. Most of the grave-stones have been copied. The hill can be reached through the Dorn gate on the Kircubbin to Portaferry Road.

TIMELINE OF HISTORY

SAINT PATRICK
Saint Patrick : Patric; ca. 387 – 17 March, 493 or ca. 460) was a Romano-British and Christian missionary, who is the most generally recognized patron saint of Ireland or the Apostle of Ireland, although Brigid of Kildare and Colmcille are also formally patron saints.

Two authentic letters from him survive, from which come the only generally accepted details of his life. When he was about 16, he was captured from his home by Irish raiders and taken as a slave to Ireland, where he lived for six years before escaping and returning to his family. After entering the Church, he returned to Ireland as an ordained bishop in the north and west of the island, but little is known about the places where he worked. By the seventh century, he had come to be revered as the patron saint of Ireland.
 Uncritical acceptance of the Annals of Ulster would imply that he lived from 340 to 440, and ministered in what is modern-day Northern Ireland from AD 428

It has been said that the old church OF ST. MARY'S was built in the 6th Century.

The Martyrology of Donegal mentions St. Fionntain of Ard Caoin whose festival falls on 8th Sept.

I think this is the same Saint.
St. Finian
Feast Day: September 10
Died: 579

Irish abbot, a disciple of Sts. Colman and Mochae also called Winin. He was born in Strangford, Lough, Ulster, in Ireland, a member of a royal family. Studying under Sts. Colman and Mochae, he became a monk in Strathclyde and was ordained in Rome. Returning to Ulster, Finian founded several monasteries, becoming abbot of Moville, in County Down, Ireland. He became embroiled with St. Columba, a student, over a copy of St. Jerome’s Psalter, and St. Columba had to surrender that copy to Finian. He also founded Holywood and Dumfries in Scotland. Finian was known for miracles, including moving a river.
http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=3365

Sts. Colman and Mochae,were at NENDRUM.

Nendrum Monastery was a Christian monastery on Mahee Island in Strangford Lough, County Down, Northern Ireland.  Founded in the 5th century by Machaoi.

Can we assume that Castlehill was in the hands of the Irish Oriel Sept of Mac Giolla Fhiondain whose name means followers of St. Fintain? They had a close alliance with the O'Neills who fought in 1567 the Savages to regain the site.
Our CLINT DNA matches the McAlindens/Mac Giolla Fhiondain .

THE VIKINGS ARRIVE
Diocese of Down and Connor, ancient and modern (Volume 1
The Danes commenced their plundering expeditions. They plundered
A.D. 823, Downpatrick, Movilla, and Inis-Doimhle (perhaps Chapel Island off Grey Abbey);" [OR COULD BE THE MONASTERY OF ST ENYES AT ARDQUIN LENA]

There is also a very ancient place beside the Abbacy Church, the home of the Echlins built 1620, on the site of the old Saint Eynes monastery [HARRIS 1744], which, on the authority of a patent roll among the public records, was seized by the crown during the war between England and France, and was granted, in 1411, by Hen. IV. to Thomas Cherele.

THE NORMAN INVASION OF IRELAND

Pope Adrian IV, the only English pope, in one of his earliest acts issued a papal bull in 1155, giving Henry II authority to invade Ireland as a means of ensuring reform by bringing the Irish Church more directly under the control of the Holy See. Little contemporary use, however, was made of the bull Laudabiliter since its text enforced papal suzerainty not only over the island of Ireland but of all islands off of the European coast, including England, in virtue of the Constantinian Donation.

Invasion of 1169
Original landing site for the invasion
Bannow Bay

After losing the protection of Tyrone Chief, Muirchertach Mac Lochlainn, High King of Ireland, who died in 1166, MacMorrough was forcibly exiled by a confederation of Irish forces under the new High King, Rory O'Connor. MacMurrough fled first to Bristol and then to Normandy. He sought and obtained permission from Henry II of England to use the latter's subjects to regain his kingdom. Having received an oath of fealty from Dermod, Henry gave him letters patent in the following words:

Henry, King of England, duke of Normandy and Aquitaine, and earl of Anjou, to all his liegemen, English, Norman, Welsh and Scotch, and to all the nations under his dominion, greeting. When these letters shall come into your hands, know ye, that we have received Dermod, Prince of Leinster, into the bosom of our grace and benevolence. Wherefore, whosoever, in the ample extent of all our territories, shall be willing to assist in restoring that prince, as our vassal and liegeman, let such person know, that we do hereby grant to him our licence and favour for the said undertaking.

By 1167 MacMurrough had obtained the services of Maurice Fitz Gerald and later persuaded Rhys ap Gruffydd Prince of Deheubarth to release Fitz Gerald's half-brother Robert Fitz-Stephen from captivity to take part in the expedition. Most importantly he obtained the support of the Earl of Pembroke Richard de Clare, known as Strongbow.

The first Norman knight to land in Ireland was Richard Fitz Robert de Roche in 1167, but it was not until 1169 that the main body of Norman, Welsh and Flemish forces landed in Wexford. Within a short time Leinster was conquered, Waterford and Dublin were under Diarmait's control. Strongbow married Diarmait's daughter, Aoife, and was named as heir to the Kingdom of Leinster. This latter development caused consternation to Henry II, who feared the establishment of a rival Norman state in Ireland. Accordingly, he resolved to visit Leinster to establish his authority.

While the main Norman invasion concentrated on Leinster, with submissions made to Henry by the other provincial kings, the situation on the ground outside Leinster remained unchanged. However, individual groups of knights invaded:

    Connacht in 1175 and 1200–03, led by William de Burgh
    Munster in 1177, led by Raymond le Gros
    East Ulster in 1177, led by John de Courcy    

These further conquests were not planned by or made with royal approval, but were then incorporated into the Lordship under Henry II's control, as with Strongbow's initial invasion.  WIKIPEDIA

In 1177 the newly arrived John de Courcy mounted a successful free-lance expedition into Ulaid, and ruled for a time as an independent 'Prince of Ulster.'HE MARRIED AFFRECA DAUGHTER OF GODRED KING OF MAN.

In 1180 Baron William Le Savage son of SIR GEFFREY Le SAVAGE OF STAINESBY & LETICE DAUGHTER OF HENRY de ARDERNE, one of Knight John de Courcy's men, was given the land to build a castle. He had 2 sons Robert & Thomas. WAS THIS WHERE ARDKEEN & THE ARDS PENINSULA GOT THEIR NAMES?

NOT LONG AFTER THE ULSTER CONQUEST WE FIND BARON WILLIAM LE SAVAGE WITNESS TO JOHN DE COURCEY’S CHARTER TO THE PRIORY OF DOWN.
THE FOLLOWING ARE THE NAMES AFFIXED TO THAT DOCUMENT.
WITNESES   RICHARD FITZ ROBERT MY SENESCHAL; ROBERT DE CASTRIA MY CONSTABLE; ADAM MY CHAMBERLAIN; WILLIAM & HENRY COPLAND;  WILLIAM SARACENO,
WILLIAM DE COURCEY; PHILLIP DE HASTING; SIMON PASSLAW; WILLIAM SAVAGE; RICHARD DE DUNDONALD; REINER HIS BROTHER; WILLIAM HOCH; WILLIAM DE LOGAN; MASTER WALTER. [WALTER SHORE P/FERRY & BALLYWALTER  EG WALTERS TOWN]
 
SEVERAL OF THOSE NAMES APPEAR IN THIS LIST OF WITNESSES FIGURE AMONGST THE TERRITORIAL MAGNATES OF ULSTER.
HISTORIANS SEEM TO BE AGREED THAT THE CONQUERED TERRITORY (INCLUDING THE MODERN LOUTH) WAS DIVIDED AMONGST THE FOLLOWING LEADERS.
SAVAGE, RUSSELL, AUDLEY, DE GERNON, VERNON, DE VERDUN, "CLINTON", MANDEVILLE, JORDAN, STANTON, POER, COPELAND, CHAMBERLAND, RIDAL, STOKES, PASSELEVY, MARTEL, LOGAN, SENDAL.
WHITE AND BISSET, ARE NAMES THAT APPEAR IN ULSTER SUBSEQUENTLY

 TAKEN FROM THE BOOK: SAVAGES OF THE ARDS

Topographical Directory of Ireland printed in 1837 by Samuel Lewis
Raymond Savage, one of the followers of De Courcy, erected a strong castle in 1196 at Ardkeen which became the chief residence of that family, whose descendants throughout the whole of the insurrection remained firmly attached to the English monarchs.  
I THINK THIS SHOULD BE BARON WILLIAM Le SAVAGE & NOT RAYMOND.   RAYMOND BUILT BALLYGALGET. LENA

"Patent Roll of 20 Edward 2nd.  1325 the King granted to John de Mandevilla the office of Sheriff of Down and Newtown." HARRIS 1744

ARDKEEN RECTORS
1345/6 THOMAS De BREDON
1385    THOMAS CUTHBERT
1386    WILLIAM De ELDON
1440    ROBERT McGOWNE
1455    JOHN MACASSYN
1524    JOHN McAGOYN
1524    RODOLPH McAGOYN

1567 THE O'NEILL RISING

1661 ROBERT ECHLIN BISHOP

John de Courcy's Charter to the Black Abbey (St. Andrew's), dated 26th May 1204, mentions the Church of Ardkeen.

In the taxation of Pope Nicholas III it mentions The Church of Ardkene valued at 10 marks. 1306 Ecclessia Sanctae Mariae de Ardkene.

Henry IV (3 April 1367 – 20 March 1413) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (1399–1413)

"Patent Roll of 1 Henry 4   1400    in Birminghans Tower Dublin that said King granted to Robert Fitz Jordon Savage the office of Sherriff of the Ardes in Ulster."HARRIS 1744

Saint Eynes monastery [HARRIS 1744], which, on the authority of a patent roll among the public records, was seized by the crown during the war between England and France, and was granted, in 1411, by Hen. IV. to Thomas Cherele.
 
"Raymond Savage made chieftain of Lecale  in May 31st. 1528 by Henry VIII Land belonged to Magenis." HARRIS 1744

In 1567, Shane O'Nial, who had overrun and destroyed the neighboring country on every side, besieged this castle, but was so vigorously repulsed that he retreated with great loss and never penetrated farther southward into the Ardes. The parish comprises, according to the Ordnance survey, 4800 ½ statute acres, of which 169 are islands, and 114 are covered with water.

IN 1572 SIR BRIAN O’NEILL BURNT GREYABBEY ABBEY WHICH WAS BUILT IN 1193 BY AFFRECA, DAUGHTER OF GODRED KING OF MAN & WIFE OF JOHN DeCOUCY & THE OLD PRIORY OF NEWTOWNARDS BUILT BY SIR ROBERT SAVAGE FOR THE DOMINICAN FRIARS IN 1244.

The old Norman Church at Adkeen was in ruins in 1621.

1641  OLD RENTAL AT PORTAFERRY
 http://www.worldfamilies.net/forum/index.php?topic=10133.0
It is interesting to read the names of the then tenants on the estate in 1641.
They are :-
PATRICK SAVAGE ESQ. His demesne.
CONBOY O'NEAL & others during pleasure.
ROWLAND SAVAGE [three townlands]
& OTHERS

1744 Andrew Savage residing in Portaferry Castle building finished in 1636."HARRIS 1744

In 1761 the Savage family, after repelling the O'Niell's, repaired the old church of St. Mary's and used it mainly as their private church. There is nothing above ground of the Savage Castle but steps that are supposed to go to a tunnel but more probably to a cellar. I have seen the steps in 2007.

The church of St Marys was used by the congregation of Ardkeen Church of Ireland from 1734 until 6th Jan 1839 when "THE BIG WIND" a very bad storm, blew the thatched roof off. The congregation then had the decision to make, build a new Church or repair an ancient one.
On 27th May 1847 the new Christ Church [The Quarter] Ardkeen was consecrated.
Gifts detonated by the Savage family to St. Mary's were moved to the new church.

NEWTOWNARDS CHRONICLE 1890 JAN 11th
SALE BY AUCTION.
HENRY MCGRATH, AUCTIONEER, PORTAFERRY AT PARKS HOTEL, PORTAFERRY IN THE MATTER OF
HENRY ROWAN MILLER BANKRUPT ON 14th JAN.
DWELLING HOUSE WITH SUITABLE OUT OFFICES BESIDE A GOOD LABOURER’S OR HERD’S COTTAGE ON THE PREMISES.
ABOUT 60 ACRES OF THE LAND KNOWN AS CASTLE HILL [ARDKEEN & BALLYWARD] AND HAS A GOOD SUPPLY OF SEAWRACK. [SEAWEED FOR FERTILIZER

St MARY'S G.Y. ARDKEEN
SAVAGE
Horizontal stone in the Church
Hereunder lyeth the body of Elenor Savage WHITE who died 28th June 1661
As also her two children,
As also her aunt K. Mgy. who died Aug. 1654  [Katherine Montgomery]
As also her cosen P.S. of B. Spurg. who died 1649  [Patrick Savage of
Ballyspurge.]

CLINT
[With angel's head and wings carved at the top.]
I.H.S.
Here lyeth the body of Nicholas Clint of Tullytroman who died 12th Jan. 1753
age 63 yrs. BORN 1690  [TULLYTRAMMON IS IN CASTLEBUOY, CLOUGHEY]
Also his wife Mary McNAB who died 12th Nov. 1759 age 66 yrs. BORN 1693
MARRIED C 1714 DIED 1759 MARRIED FOR 45 YRS.
and their Childring

CLINT
I.H.S.
Here lyety the body of JOHN Clint of Ballygellah who died 20 Aug. 1804 age 58 yrs. BORN 1746 HE HAD A SISTER NANCY WHO MARRIED JOHN HUGHES
Also of Margaret his wife died 9th Aug. 1776 age 30 yrs.
BORN 1746 MARRIED C 1770 DIED AGE 30 MARRIED FOR 6 YRS HAD MARGARET B 1771 BELOW AND JOHN CLINT JUN WHO MARRIED NANCY SAVAGE
Likewise of Margaret Clint their daughter who died 1st Oct. 1803 age 32 yrs.
BORN 1771
Also of Nancy Clint alias SAVAGE wife of John Clint Jun. who died 1st Oct 1818 age 39 yrs. [NANCY SAVAGE CLINT BORN 1779 M C 1800 DIED AGE 39 MARRIED FOR C 18 YRS.]
And also of John Clint their son age 1 yr. SON JOHN DIED AGE 1YR

CLINT
TOP HALF BROKEN OFF
-----CLINT who died 1785
Also Hanna DOUGHERTY who died 1805 aged 48 yrs. BORN 1757

HUGHES
I.H.S
Erec by John Hughes of Ballygellagh in mem. of his mother Nancy Hughes alias CLINT who died 24th June 1809 aged 62 yrs.
Also his father John Hughes who died 28th Jan 1836 aged 92 yrs.

In 1628 John ECHLIN bought the lands of Castleboy for his eldest son and
heir Robert, who rented it to his cousin Robert Echline (Scottish spelling)

ECHLINE
[Worn horizontal stone in the centre of the church with arms]
quarterly 1st & 4th, a galley; 2nd & 3rd, a fess cheque; in chief a deer pursued by a dog.
crest a talbot passant.]
Here lyes interd the body of Robert Echline of Castleboye Esq. who died 25th day of April 1657 in the 29th year of his life.
Also the body of his daughter Maria.

ECHLIN
Horizontal stone at east end of the Church
Here lieth the body of John Echlin of Priesttown who died 4th sept. 1714 aged 45 yrs.
As also Jane Echlin his wife who died 25th Nov. 1742 aged 67 yrs.

FOR THE ECHLINS SEE HERE http://www.worldfamilies.net/forum/index.php?topic=8886.0

Topographical Directory of Ireland printed in 1837 by Samuel Lewis
    
CASTLEBUOY, or ST. JOHNSTOWN, an extra parochial liberty, in the barony of ARDES, county of DOWN, and province of ULSTER, 3 miles (N.E.) from Portaferry; containing 744 inhabitants.
This place is situated on Cloghy Bay, and, according to the Ordnance survey, comprises 1358 and a quarter statute acres.
A commandery or preceptory of St. John the Baptist of Jerusalem, dependent on the priory of Kilmainham, was founded here by Hugh de Lacy, in 1189, which continued till the commencement of the fifteenth century; the building is now in ruins, and the family of Echlin possesses several townlands in freehold which have always enjoyed exemption from tithe and church cess, and also a manor which belonged to the commandery, the court of which is now held once in three weeks.

The manor is called Cloghy, and the court has jurisdiction over the liberty of Castlebuoy, the parishes of Slanes and Ballytrustin, and part of Witter, and any sum not exceeding £5 is recoverable in it, either by attachment or civil bill process.

The lofty tower of the castle and ruins of the church are situated in one of the most secluded and fertile vales in the Ardes. On a chain of rock in the channel, three miles east from the shore, is the South Rock or Kilwarlin lighthouse. There is a private school in which are about 70 boys and 60 girls.

« Last Edit: February 21, 2014, 02:41:26 PM by Lena McVea » Logged
Mary Lee Becker
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« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2012, 05:02:04 PM »

Here is another book link, this one to the 1864 Dublin edition of the Martyrology of Donegal, in which they list:

Table of the Martyrology,Pg. 421
Fiontain of Ard-caoin....8 Sept

http://books.google.com/books?id=O1FXAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA421&lpg=PA421&dq=St.+Finnian+of+Ard+Caoin&source=bl&ots=6KqyAyEhjL&sig=rB7cNLHiPzCzY7boPxxruf3dTjk&hl=en&sa=X&ei=zU-IUOWjLcqoigLF9oCwDA&sqi=2&ved=0CEQQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q=St.%20Finnian%20of%20Ard%20Caoin&f=false
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Mary Lee Becker
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« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2012, 06:02:43 PM »

Lena, I think that we are both thinking that "Fiontain of Ard-caoin" might actually be more accurately, "Fiontain of Ardkeen"

We know now, from the Y-DNA test results, that the "Clints" are matching the 'Mac Giolla Fhiondain' aka the "sons of the follower of St. Fintan"

There were several St. Fintans, so we may have had a church dedicated to "St. Fintan of Ardkeen" under the ruins of St. Mary's Church at Castle Hill.

As you so brilliantly pointed out, John de Courcy's charter mentions a Church of Ardkeen

And that older church / abbey must come from the time of the O'Neills. As I have pointed out, the Mac Giolla Fhiondain end up in Creggan, Armagh with the O'Neils of the Fews. There they were known by the surnames of Mac Liondain, McAlinden, Linden, and Lyndon. See here for some info on the Mac Liondain's of Creggan:

http://creggan1.tripod.com/Creggan1e.htm

The early Clint graves that you have found in St. Mary's point to some of the Mac Giolla Fhiondain remaining on the Ards, and some going to Creggan. Or just as likely, the Mac Giolla Fhiondain could have originally been in southeast Armagh and southwest Down (as some historians think), and spread into the area around Strangford Lough.

No two other people would have ever figured this out. We needed Y-DNA from the Clints and from the McAlindens to make this connection. And we needed Lena's background as a local person to make more sense of the results.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2012, 06:04:52 PM by Mary Lee Becker » Logged
Mary Lee Becker
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« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2012, 03:51:48 PM »

Here is a short but informative web page on Ardkeen by Joe Gilmore:

http://www.docstoc.com/docs/82731363/Parish-of-Ardkeen---Some-related-historical-aspects

Quoted from the above web page:

page 5:
"A) Ecclessia Sanctae Mariae de Ardkene. The present ruins of the Church of St. Mary built on the southern slope of Castle Hill of Ardkeen are reputed to occupy the site of a much earlier church where the feast of St. Fionntain was celebrated on 8th Sptember.”

Page 6:
"(G) Ecclesia de Ardchin is taken to be the Norman church at Ardquin later known as The Abbacy, and later to be the seat of Protestant Bishop Echlin who was given property here in 1613. The name would suggest a former monastic site.”

And also this:

“The Motte at Ardkeen belonged to the Norman family of Savages, a typical Norman manor with a church attached. This had been the site of a  rath built in a earlier period by one of the Irish chieftains. A Norman knight, Talbot, built a motte  on the eat coast of the Ards, now called Ballyhalbert (Talbot’s townland). Nicholas Galgyl was given lands to the south, now called Ballygalet. The Mandvilles were given an area on the shores of Strangford Lough, now Inishargy and Kircubbin. It is interesting to note that a few of the Irish overlords remained, one of whom may still have resided at Lisbane where a platform rath had been in existance since at least the 9th century. The Normans built many small churches and each of their castles would have had a church close by.”

Mary Becker

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