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OConnor
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« on: July 29, 2012, 10:02:44 PM »

Did most M222 in Ireland arrive with Gallowglass from Scotland?

Donnegal and Connacht were two regions ripe with Scotish Gallowglass.

Large numbers of gallowglass septs settled in Ireland after being dispossessed of their lands in Scotland for choosing the wrong sides in the Wars of Scottish Independence. The first and probably most famous of these were the MacSweeneys, (who unlike most were said to be of native Irish ancestry) settled originally by the O’Donnells in west Donegal.

These were followed by MacDonnells, MacCabes and several other groups settled by powerful Irish nobles in different areas. The gallowglass' attraction was they were a heavily armoured trained aristocratic infantry who could be relied on for a strong defence to hold a position, whereas most Irish foot soldiers were lower class less well armoured troops than the Irish nobility who typically fought as cavalry. In time there came to be many native Irish gallowglass as the term came to mean a type of warrior rather than an ethnic designation.

The first record of gallowglass service under the Irish was in 1259, when Aedh Ó Conchobair, King of Connacht, received a dowry of 160 Scottish warriors from the daughter of the King of the Hebrides. They were organised into groups known as a "Corrughadh", which consisted of about 100 men. In return for military service, gallowglass contingents were given land and settled in Irish lordships, where they were entitled to receive supplies from the local population.

In 1569 Turlough O'Neill married Lady Agnes MacDonald of Kintyre. Her dowry consisted of at least 1200 galloglass fighters. Along with support of two young men as support and friends on top to assist or fight this could easily have numbered over 5,000 current and future Gallowglass coming into the area.[1]
 
By 1512, there were reported to be fifty-nine groups throughout the country under the control of the Irish nobility. Though initially they were mercenaries, over time they settled and their ranks became filled with native Irish men.

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

How many of these men or descendants adopted Irish surnames???


 

« Last Edit: July 29, 2012, 10:05:20 PM by OConnor » Logged

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eochaidh
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« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2012, 10:23:28 PM »

I thought posters on this forum, and other forums, already determined that M222 was most likely from the Continent; I think Germany.

So, if M222 came to Ireland by way of Scotland, it came to Scotland by way of Germany first.

I'm not sure anyone would ever accept that M222 came to the Continent from anywhere in The Isles. It just couldn't happen.  :)
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rms2
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« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2012, 07:06:28 AM »

I don't recall there being a consensus that M222 came from the Continent. Personally, I tend to doubt that myself, but I'm not an expert on M222.

Anyway, it was interesting to see the surname MacCabe listed among the Gallowglass. I had an uncle with a variant of that surname: McCabe. We always pronounced it Mac-a-bee, like the Maccabees of biblical fame.

He was a good guy and taught me to hunt. Shot my first goose on a trip with my Uncle Lloyd McCabe. A man's man, and that's a big compliment in my book.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2012, 07:09:34 AM by rms2 » Logged

inver2b1
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« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2012, 09:02:09 AM »

Scotland has been claimed as the likely source for a while now, would gallowglasses not be a bit late in Irish history for the source of the big M222 expansion?
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« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2012, 09:09:24 AM »

Scotland has been claimed as the likely source for a while now, would gallowglasses not be a bit late in Irish history for the source of the big M222 expansion?

I think you're right about that. The source would have to be older.
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OConnor
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« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2012, 09:24:36 AM »

I was referring to the bulk of M222, not all.

Perhaps 1259 - 1569 is too late?

I don't know where M222 was first hatched, that wasn't  my question.
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inver2b1
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« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2012, 09:56:22 AM »

I was referring to the bulk of M222, not all.

Perhaps 1259 - 1569 is too late?

I don't know where M222 was first hatched, that wasn't  my question.

But wouldn't most of it have come from the big family lineages; Ui Niall, Ui Brien?
In these cases wouldn't it need to have been present around the first half of the first millenium, of course it depends on what causes these families to take off; were they new arrivals who dominated or were they already established?
Of course M222 isn't restricted to the families that claim to be Connachta dynasties and in the case of gallowglasses they definitley coudl have been M222 I had a look through the McCabe project on FTDNA, I only see one M222+ but then again many have only tested to M269.
http://www.familytreedna.com/public/McCabe/default.aspx?section=ysnp


I see in the Sweeney project they have some I-M223, that would also be a likley candidate for gallowglasses.
Also weren't gallowglasses meant to have some Norse admixture, it woul be interesting to see if there are any Norse associated haplogroups in the surnames associated with them.

The most common surname in Donegal is Gallagher (has an UiNiall origin) and the meaning of it means foreign worker or foreign lover; I wonder would this be a mercenary reference?
« Last Edit: July 30, 2012, 10:01:18 AM by inver2b1 » Logged

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OConnor
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« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2012, 10:07:13 AM »

Big families?

Were the families bigger than the number gallowglass ?
For instance in my initial post:

"In 1569 Turlough O'Neill married Lady Agnes MacDonald of Kintyre. Her dowry consisted of at least 1200 galloglass fighters. Along with support of two young men as support and friends on top to assist or fight this could easily have numbered over 5,000 current and future Gallowglass coming into the area."

Wouldn't these men create families? Did any of them adopt the name of the Irish family they were serving? Did some perhaps became part of the clan/tribe over time?

 
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inver2b1
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« Reply #8 on: July 30, 2012, 10:17:47 AM »

Yeah they could have gotten into important positions, but I still think the bulk of it would have been from earlier more established powerful families where the male figure head had concubines or ealy historic era irish equivalents. I think one of the O'Donnels around the 15th century had something like 15 grandsons, so imagine this kind of thing building up over the centuries.
Gallowglasses were also in a high risk profession so of all of them that cam eove rwhat would the survival rate have been.
The gallowglasses are of interest to me also as the time period and origin matches my haplogroup.
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« Reply #9 on: July 30, 2012, 10:44:27 AM »

I don't recall there being a consensus that M222 came from the Continent. Personally, I tend to doubt that myself, but I'm not an expert on M222.

I think M222 probably came from the Isles too. Jean M had the hypothesis they might be La Tiene and hence possibly from Germany. That is a possibility. My own thought is that the M222 launched into Ireland from Western Britain, not necessarily Scotland. I  think that because some of the DF23+ M222- clusters that have a Welsh affinity.

Last time I checked, diversity for M222 was higher in England as well, but the differences between geographies are fairly insignificant so I don't know that STR diversity is that helpful on this.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2012, 10:44:55 AM by Mikewww » Logged

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Jean M
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« Reply #10 on: July 30, 2012, 10:58:02 AM »

I think M222 probably came from the Isles too. Jean M had the hypothesis they might be La Tene and hence possibly from Germany.

Nothing to do with Germany. Let's distinguish between:

1. The entry of La Tène Culture (450 BC +) into Britain from northern France.  

2. The later movement of La Tène culture from northern Britain to Northern Ireland round 200 BC.

All I'm saying is that I suspect M222 arose among Celts in Britain, and was transported from there into Northern Ireland with La Tène, not that M222 arose in the Continental heartland of La Tène.

I wouldn't rule out M222 also among later arrivals in Ireland. That's one of the big problems with this game. The very same haplogroup could arrive at a lot of different times.

« Last Edit: July 30, 2012, 11:08:26 AM by Jean M » Logged
sernam
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« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2012, 11:07:57 AM »

Did most M222 in Ireland arrive with Gallowglass from Scotland?

Not likely seeing as most Gallowglass families were noblemen from the western isles & a significant number most likely, of ultimately Scandinavian paternity.
Donnegal and Connacht were two regions ripe with Scotish Gallowglass.
For Connacht (& elsewhere), most of the gallowglass were of hebridian ancestry (see above) & while some are likely to have been M222, it seems unlikely most were or were responsible for spreading it to large groups of other surnames.

In Donegal, the Sweeney’s were traditionally said to be of O’Neill (thus Ui Niall so possibly significantly M222) ancestry. They got tossed out of CastleSween & Knapdale in Argyll, Scotland & were given land in the Fanad peninsula, they eventually spread to become 3 distinct septs there (business was good) , becoming by 1921 number 6 in most common names of Donegal (they also spread to the area of Muskerry in Cork & are numerous there in SW Ireland also) but to try to suggest the Sweeneys are the reason why so many Gallagher’s, Boyles, doughertys, O’Donnell’s, Cannons, & other related names are M222 seems a bit absurd.
Large numbers of gallowglass septs settled in Ireland after being dispossessed of their lands in Scotland for choosing the wrong sides in the Wars of Scottish Independence. The first and probably most famous of these were the MacSweeneys, (who unlike most were said to be of native Irish ancestry) settled originally by the O’Donnells in west Donegal.

These were followed by MacDonnells, MacCabes and several other groups settled by powerful Irish nobles in different areas. The gallowglass' attraction was they were a heavily armoured trained aristocratic infantry who could be relied on for a strong defence to hold a position, whereas most Irish foot soldiers were lower class less well armoured troops than the Irish nobility who typically fought as cavalry. In time there came to be many native Irish gallowglass as the term came to mean a type of warrior rather than an ethnic designation.

Maybe te best part of a terrible wiki article. ;)
The first record of gallowglass service under the Irish was in 1259, when Aedh Ó Conchobair, King of Connacht, received a dowry of 160 Scottish warriors from the daughter of the King of the Hebrides. They were organised into groups known as a "Corrughadh", which consisted of about 100 men. In return for military service, gallowglass contingents were given land and settled in Irish lordships, where they were entitled to receive supplies from the local population.



It seems from the way it’s written that these 160 gallowglass of O’Connor were in units of 100. (AFAIK it was generally units of 80 plus extra phantom men to defray costs) & implies O’Connor’s men were settled in Ireland but they weren’t.


In 1569 Turlough O'Neill married Lady Agnes MacDonald of Kintyre. Her dowry consisted of at least 1200 galloglass fighters. Along with support of two young men as support and friends on top to assist or fight this could easily have numbered over 5,000 current and future Gallowglass coming into the area.[1]
 
Were they actually gallowglass or just Scot mercenaries? Gallowglass were in decline at this point & that article seems to conflate gallowglass w Scot (Look at calling Alister McColla a gallowglass instead of a refugee)


By 1512, there were reported to be fifty-nine groups throughout the country under the control of the Irish nobility. Though initially they were mercenaries, over time they settled and their ranks became filled with native Irish men.

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

How many of these men or descendants adopted Irish surnames???

Most likely not too many plus they were only a small amount relatively speaking.

 [/quote]
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sernam
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« Reply #12 on: July 30, 2012, 11:12:07 AM »

Message deleted.

Please, let's not stir that up again unnecessarily.

You know what I am talking about.

rms2
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Dubhthach
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« Reply #13 on: July 30, 2012, 05:32:58 PM »

Awh "Toirdhealbhach Luineach Mac Néill Chonnalaigh Ó Néill", an often overlooked figure in 16th century Irish history. There is at least one major piece of 16th century Irish poety dedicated to him.

The Luineach implies he was fostered by the Ó Luinigh family when he was a child. (West Tyrone/Derry), he based himself out of Strabane. The "Connalaigh" was part of his own "sub-clan" name. He was made a "life earl" of "Clan-Connell" for example. He became The Ó Néill (in otherwords the chief) after the death of Seán Ó Néill, and as mentioned was a son in law of Campbell the Earl of Argyll.
Blog post about him here:
http://timothylunney.wordpress.com/2008/06/15/turlough-luineach-the-oneill-mor-and-king-of-ulster/

Anyways Gallowglasses only start appearing in Ireland from the 13th century onwards. The first surviving reference is specific to the dowry received by the King of Connacht (Aedh mac Eoghan Ó Conchobhair) in 1259, when he received 160 gallowglasses. At the time of Toirdhealbhach I would imagine that the men he received were "Redshanks". If anything the nearby Lagan in Donegal had a major Redshank settlement during the 16th century. Many of these later assimilated and converted into the Scottish settlement during the Ulster plantation.

"Ulster Heritage" blog has recently released a book on the Redshank settlement in the Laggan, their arrival is dated at 1569 though it's connected with marriage of "Iníon Dubh" (Black/dark daughter) into the Ó Domhnaill. Her actual name was Fionnuala Nic Dhómhnaill (McDonald/McDonnells of the isles).

http://www.ulsterheritage.com/store/index.php?recid=16&page=1

Either way with 40 years of that event the annihilation of Irish society was basically in full swing.

There is also the point that the "hotspot" for want of better term for M222 in Scotland doesn't appear to be in the Isles. We also see lines connected to the wider Connachta in Ulster testing M222+, for example Ó Conchobhair (O'Connor). In another thread here I posted about a McManus who matched M222+ O'Connors and was from Roscommon. This family is a branch of the O'Connors from the 12th century, plus we see M222+ results from other Uí Briúin names such as McDermot, McDonagh who have a branch point from the O'Connors in the 9-10th century.

if we go further back e also see M222 results showing up in the surnames connected to the Uí Fhiachrach, for example Dowd/O'Dowd (Uí Fhiachrach Muaidhe) and O'Shaughnessy (Uí Fhiachrach Aidhne).

After all the last common ancestor for all three groups (Uí Fhiachrach, Uí Bhriúin and Uí Néill) is the proto-history Eochaidh Mughmedhon (Eochaidh the slave lord). Bríon and Fiachra been full brothers (along with Ailill) with Niall been their half brother.

Emphasis on "proto-history" bit here. This is after all the generation before Patrick.

There's a copy of the story about the brothers available here: (web-translation -- don't know how faithfull to original text)

The Adventures of the Sons of Eochaid Mugmedon
http://www.maryjones.us/ctexts/eochaid.html

As Sernam mentions a unit was technically 100 men, however there was a certain number of what were known as "black men" (that's the translated term) who only existed on paper, these men's wages were taken by the Captain of the unit as his own pay.
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Dubhthach
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« Reply #14 on: July 30, 2012, 05:47:05 PM »

I think M222 probably came from the Isles too. Jean M had the hypothesis they might be La Tene and hence possibly from Germany.

Nothing to do with Germany. Let's distinguish between:

1. The entry of La Tène Culture (450 BC +) into Britain from northern France.  

2. The later movement of La Tène culture from northern Britain to Northern Ireland round 200 BC.

All I'm saying is that I suspect M222 arose among Celts in Britain, and was transported from there into Northern Ireland with La Tène, not that M222 arose in the Continental heartland of La Tène.

I wouldn't rule out M222 also among later arrivals in Ireland. That's one of the big problems with this game. The very same haplogroup could arrive at a lot of different times.


To avoid confusion I should emphases that it's the Northern half of Ireland.. Obviously there is large amount of finds across Ulster (9 counties) but the line of finds extends half way down the country, roughly following the demarcation of the Eiscir Riada (from Galway to Dublin).

Personally it would surprise me if M222 arose in groups connected with the Brigantes of Northern Britain, given the Roman conquest of the area in the end of 1st century and beginning of 2nd century it could tie in with movement into Ireland of that specific lineage.

Of course the Uí Néill/Connachta "pseudo-history" has the mythical tale of Tuathal Teachtmar and how he fled to "Britain" (Alba -- but obviously meaning the original meaning of Britian -- thence Albion) in his mother's womb after the supposed uprising of the provincal kings against his father (his mother is protrayed as the daughter of the King of Alba), and then that he later returns as a man with an army to reclaim his birthright.

The pseudo-historians of course put all these events as occuring in later 1st century to early second history AD. Perhaps a folkmemory rewritten?
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« Reply #15 on: July 30, 2012, 07:09:47 PM »

Awh "Toirdhealbhach Luineach Mac Néill Chonnalaigh Ó Néill", an often overlooked figure in 16th century Irish history.
But not around here lately
At the time of Toirdhealbhach I would imagine that the men he received were "Redshanks".
What I assume also.  As I mentioned the other day,  TLO was supposef to have settled Scots on his sparsely populated lands but I presume them to be simple mercenaries and /or peasants that could be raised & armed similar to the way Shane would arm the “cowboys”.

If anything the nearby Lagan in Donegal had a major Redshank settlement during the 16th century. Many of these later assimilated and converted into the Scottish settlement during the Ulster plantation.
"Ulster Heritage" blog has recently released a book on the Redshank settlement in the Laggan, their arrival is dated at 1569 though it's connected with marriage of "Iníon Dubh" (Black/dark daughter) into the Ó Domhnaill. Her actual name was Fionnuala Nic Dhómhnaill (McDonald/McDonnells of the isles).
Interesting, it explains why Red Hugh O'Donnell gave Niall Garve’s Lifford Castle to Ms McDonnell. Brilliant move by the way.
I know the area later was associated w settled Scot mercenaries from the English Army, I wasn’t aware of the mixing w previous opponents. There were quite a few Gaelic names there.

There is also the point that the "hotspot" for want of better term for M222 in Scotland doesn't appear to be in the Isles. We also see lines connected to the wider Connachta in Ulster testing M222+, for example Ó Conchobhair (O'Connor). In another thread here I posted about a McManus who matched M222+ O'Connors and was from Roscommon. This family is a branch of the O'Connors from the 12th century, plus we see M222+ results from other Uí Briúin names such as McDermot, McDonagh who have a branch point from the O'Connors in the 9-10th century.
Some of it appears in Scotland in the Galloway area & other among some families of purported Ui Niall ancestry & seems to favor the west. I’m aware it shows up among Connachta families as well.

if we go further back e also see M222 results showing up in the surnames connected to the Uí Fhiachrach, for example Dowd/O'Dowd (Uí Fhiachrach Muaidhe) and O'Shaughnessy (Uí Fhiachrach Aidhne).

After all the last common ancestor for all three groups (Uí Fhiachrach, Uí Bhriúin and Uí Néill) is the proto-history Eochaidh Mughmedhon (Eochaidh the slave lord). Bríon and Fiachra been full brothers (along with Ailill) with Niall been their half brother.

Emphasis on "proto-history" bit here. This is after all the generation before Patrick.

There's a copy of the story about the brothers available here: (web-translation -- don't know how faithfull to original text)

The Adventures of the Sons of Eochaid Mugmedon
http://www.maryjones.us/ctexts/eochaid.html

As Sernam mentions a unit was technically 100 men, however there was a certain number of what were known as "black men" (that's the translated term) who only existed on paper, these men's wages were taken by the Captain of the unit as his own pay.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2012, 07:10:57 PM by sernam » Logged
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« Reply #16 on: July 31, 2012, 05:00:34 PM »

Very weird theory.  Non starter IMO.   Think you probably meant 'unspoken' rather than unspeakable :0)
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« Reply #17 on: July 31, 2012, 05:52:15 PM »

Personally it would surprise me if M222 arose in groups connected with the Brigantes of Northern Britain,

Do you mean it would not surprise you?
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« Reply #18 on: August 01, 2012, 11:20:26 AM »

Very weird theory.  Non starter IMO.   Think you probably meant 'unspoken' rather than unspeakable :0)

whatever. thank-you for your comment.
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M42+, M45+, M526+, M74+, M89+, M9+, M94+, P108+, P128+, P131+, P132+, P133+, P134+, P135+, P136+, P138+, P139+, P14+, P140+, P141+, P143+, P145+, P146+, P148+, P149+, P151+, P157+, P158+, P159+, P160+, P161+, P163+, P166+, P187+, P207+, P224+, P226+, P228+, P229+, P230+, P231+, P232+, P233+, P234+, P235+, P236+, P237+, P238+, P239+, P242+, P243+, P244+, P245+, P280+, P281+, P282+, P283+, P284+, P285+, P286+, P294+, P295+, P297+, P305+, P310+, P311+, P312+, P316+, M173+, M269+, M343+, P312+, L21+, DF13+, M207+, P25+, L11+, L138+, L141+, L15+, L150+, L16+, L23+, L51+, L52+, M168+, M173+, M207+, M213+, M269+, M294+, M299+, M306+, M343+, P69+, P9.1+, P97+, PK1+, SRY10831.1+, L21+, L226-, M37-, M222-, L96-, L193-, L144-, P66-, SRY2627-, M222-, DF49-, L371-, DF41-, L513-, L555-, L1335-, L1406-, Z251-, L526-, L130-, L144-, L159.2-, L192.1-, L193-, L195-, L96-, DF21-, Z255-, DF23-, DF1-, Z253-, M37-, M65-, M73-, M18-, M126-, M153-, M160-, P66-

12 24 14 10 11 14 12 12 12 13 13 29 18


rms2
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« Reply #19 on: August 01, 2012, 11:52:08 AM »

Pardon me, everyone, but I am going to momentarily hijack this thread, but to tell a tale tangentially related to its theme, since it once again deals with that scion of the House of MacCabe of Gallowglass fame, my uncle, Lloyd McCabe.

When I was ten years old, my uncle took me rabbit hunting one night. Yes, it was night, and we were "spotlighting" rabbits, an illegal practice. It involved my uncle driving his car down old dirt or gravel country roads through the woods with the headlights out. Every now and then he would stop suddenly and turn on the headlights. Any rabbit in or beside the road would freeze in his tracks, blinded and mesmerized by the glaring headlights, making it a simple matter to shoot him.

Not very sporting, but if you enjoy fried rabbit or rabbit stew, very productive.

Other aspects of our hunt that I haven't yet mentioned are that another of my uncles, Marvin, and I were riding on the hood of the car with loaded shotguns, ready to shoot the petrified rabbits, and the fact that my uncle Lloyd enjoyed Jack Daniels Whiskey, even while behind the wheel.

We were cruising down a gravel country road in the dark when my uncle Marvin, from his position on the right side of the hood, spotted a rabbit and shouted, "Stop!"

Uncle Lloyd slammed on the brakes and the bright headlights at the same time.

Needless to say, the hood of Uncle Lloyd's car was not equipped with seat belts. Uncle Marvin and I were flung from the hood of the car, loaded shotguns and all, and into the rough gravel of the road. If there had been rabbits there, they fled.

It's a wonder I lived to have sons of my own, but I did. :-)

Wonder if my Uncle Lloyd was M222+. Guess I'll never know.

 

« Last Edit: August 01, 2012, 12:07:32 PM by rms2 » Logged

Dubhthach
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« Reply #20 on: August 01, 2012, 02:30:13 PM »

Personally it would surprise me if M222 arose in groups connected with the Brigantes of Northern Britain,

Do you mean it would not surprise you?

Indeed, that's the one!
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Dubhthach
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« Reply #21 on: August 01, 2012, 02:39:31 PM »

Pardon me, everyone, but I am going to momentarily hijack this thread, but to tell a tale tangentially related to its theme, since it once again deals with that scion of the House of MacCabe of Gallowglass fame, my uncle, Lloyd McCabe.

<--snip-->

Wonder if my Uncle Lloyd was M222+. Guess I'll never know.


Nice story, here's what Woulfe has to say about McCabe:

Quote
Mac CÁBA—IV—M'Caba, MacCabe, Macabe; 'son of Cába' (probably a nickname; cf. 'cába,' a cap or hood); the name of a military family of Norse origin who came over from the Hebrides, in the 14th century, and settled in Breifney, where they became captains of gallowglasses to the O'Rourkes and O'Reillys. Their pedigree is given by MacFirbis, from which it appears that they are a branch of the Mac Leods (See Mac Leóid). The MacCabes are frequently mentioned in the Annals of the Four Masters, the earliest mention being at the year 1358. They are still numerous in Breifney (Leitrim and Cavan), and in the neighbouring counties of Monaghan and Meath.

--
Mac LEÓID—V—MacLeod, MacCleod, MacCloud; 'son of Leóid' (the Norse 'Ljotr,' ugly); the name of a well-known Scottish clan, once powerful in Lewis and Harris. Some of them settled in Ireland in the 16th century.

I believe there is a Hopkins/McCabe cluster under L21. If my memory hold rights Hopkins (in Ireland) is a branch of the McCabe's. What's interesting is that the "private" snp's L319.1 and L302 (L302 is under L319) appear in some of the Hopkins in this cluster (though not the McCabes)
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inver2b1
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« Reply #22 on: August 01, 2012, 02:44:30 PM »

Pardon me, everyone, but I am going to momentarily hijack this thread, but to tell a tale tangentially related to its theme, since it once again deals with that scion of the House of MacCabe of Gallowglass fame, my uncle, Lloyd McCabe.

When I was ten years old, my uncle took me rabbit hunting one night. Yes, it was night, and we were "spotlighting" rabbits, an illegal practice. It involved my uncle driving his car down old dirt or gravel country roads through the woods with the headlights out. Every now and then he would stop suddenly and turn on the headlights. Any rabbit in or beside the road would freeze in his tracks, blinded and mesmerized by the glaring headlights, making it a simple matter to shoot him.

Not very sporting, but if you enjoy fried rabbit or rabbit stew, very productive.

Other aspects of our hunt that I haven't yet mentioned are that another of my uncles, Marvin, and I were riding on the hood of the car with loaded shotguns, ready to shoot the petrified rabbits, and the fact that my uncle Lloyd enjoyed Jack Daniels Whiskey, even while behind the wheel.

We were cruising down a gravel country road in the dark when my uncle Marvin, from his position on the right side of the hood, spotted a rabbit and shouted, "Stop!"

Uncle Lloyd slammed on the brakes and the bright headlights at the same time.

Needless to say, the hood of Uncle Lloyd's car was not equipped with seat belts. Uncle Marvin and I were flung from the hood of the car, loaded shotguns and all, and into the rough gravel of the road. If there had been rabbits there, they fled.

It's a wonder I lived to have sons of my own, but I did. :-)

Wonder if my Uncle Lloyd was M222+. Guess I'll never know.

 



Ireland has the Bull McCabe (made famous in The Field) and you have Bunny McCabe!
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« Reply #23 on: August 01, 2012, 02:53:27 PM »


Ireland has the Bull McCabe (made famous in The Field) and you have Bunny McCabe!

Played brilliantly by the late great Richard Harris.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjKJnsMwHk0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qk-03oFgvyQ
« Last Edit: August 01, 2012, 02:55:12 PM by Dubhthach » Logged
rms2
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« Reply #24 on: August 01, 2012, 06:49:40 PM »



Ireland has the Bull McCabe (made famous in The Field) and you have Bunny McCabe!

He was good for more than just rabbits. My uncle hunted and fished for just about anything you could eat. He had a big freezer next to his house under the covered portion of his driveway. It was chock full of squirrels, rabbits, ducks, geese, catfish, and venison.

I always loved visiting him because I knew I would be in for a big adventure.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2012, 06:49:58 PM by rms2 » Logged

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