World Families Forums - Analysis of surname origins identifies genetic admixture events ...

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
September 23, 2014, 11:44:58 PM
Home Help Search Login Register

+  World Families Forums
|-+  General Forums - Note: You must Be Logged In to post. Anyone can browse.
| |-+  R1b General (Moderator: rms2)
| | |-+  Analysis of surname origins identifies genetic admixture events ...
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Analysis of surname origins identifies genetic admixture events ...  (Read 378 times)
gtc
Old Hand
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 238


« on: July 29, 2012, 11:24:47 AM »

It's always great to get any genetic genealogical data and research on France and surrounding regions, so this paper published on Nature.com and its hg statistics tables should be of interest to R1b people, particularly U106 and P312.

Its conclusion regarding the use of anthroponymy of surnames in tracing admixture events (bolded below) is quite interesting.

Also of particular interest to those of us starved of French data is this statement from within the paper: "Accurate frequencies of all subhaplogroups within France, inclusively Northern France, are expected soon (Ramos-Luis E, personal communication)"

Abstract:

"Patrilineal heritable surnames are widely used to select autochthonous participants for studies on small-scale population genetic patterns owing to the unique link between the surname and a genetic marker, the Y-chromosome (Y-chr). Today, the question arises as to whether the surname origin will be informative on top of in-depth genealogical pedigrees. Admixture events that happened in the period after giving heritable surnames but before the start of genealogical records may be informative about the additional value of the surname origin. In this context, an interesting historical event is the demic migration from French-speaking regions in Northern France to the depopulated and Dutch-speaking region Flanders at the end of the sixteenth century. Y-chr subhaplogroups of individuals with a French/Roman surname that could be associated with this migration event were compared with those of a group with autochthonous Flemish surnames.

Although these groups could not be differentiated based on in-depth genealogical data, they were significantly genetically different from each other. Moreover, the observed genetic divergence was related to the differences in the distributions of main Y-subhaplogroups between contemporary populations from Northern France and Flanders. Therefore, these results indicate that the surname origin can be an important feature on top of in-depth genealogical results to select autochthonous participants for a regional population genetic study based on Y-chromosomes."


Conclusions

"The vicissitudes of war in the low countries (1568–1648) caused a substantial migration from contemporary Northern France to the ravaged and depopulated areas of Flanders in the second half of the sixteenth century, most probably after 1585. Although this migration from Northern France to Flanders happened more than 400 years ago and could not be traced based on genealogical pedigrees, it is still possible to find a signal of Y-chr differentiation between a group with AFSs and a group with FRSs associated with this northwards migration at the end of the sixteenth century. This small-scale migration led to an admixture event, which influenced the genetic variation within Flanders. The fact that such an admixture event could be traced based on anthroponymy of surnames in contrast to in-depth genealogy strongly suggests for the first time that the analysis of the surname origin can be used as an important feature to select DNA donors for population genetic studies on regional scale on top of in-depth genealogical data."

Link to paper:

http://www.nature.com/hdy/journal/v109/n2/full/hdy201217a.html
Logged

Y-DNA: R1b-Z12* (R1b1a2a1a1a3b2b1a1a1) GGG-GF Ireland (roots reportedly Anglo-Norman)
mtDNA: I3b (FMS) Maternal lines Irish
rms2
Board Moderator
Guru
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5023


« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2012, 11:36:09 AM »

I think I saw something on Dienekes' blog on that paper awhile back. They didn't test for L21, so probably some of that P312* is L21.
Logged

gtc
Old Hand
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 238


« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2012, 11:50:25 AM »

I think I saw something on Dienekes' blog on that paper awhile back. They didn't test for L21, so probably some of that P312* is L21.

May well be. Let's hope that what E Ramos-Luis is referring to goes deep enough.

I'm a little concerned when today's researchers rely on the 2006 Whit-Athey predictor which is so high level.
 
Logged

Y-DNA: R1b-Z12* (R1b1a2a1a1a3b2b1a1a1) GGG-GF Ireland (roots reportedly Anglo-Norman)
mtDNA: I3b (FMS) Maternal lines Irish
Castlebob
Old Hand
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 216


« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2012, 01:01:53 PM »

The link to the paper mentions plague etc in  16th C in Flanders, allowing a vacuum to develop, filled by the French. That's ironic as many Flemings in earlier centuries headed west to France when floods hit the region.
In earlier times, William the Conqueror spent years arranging marriages between the Norman, Fleming & Breton nobility to try & prevent a reoccurrence of conflicts such as the Breton-Norman war in the years before the Conquest of 1066. An example: Constance, the Conqueror's daughter was betrothed to Alan IV, Duke of Brittany. Later, Alan's 9-year-old daughter wed the 12-year-old Count Baldwin VII of Flanders.
Some of these, & later similar unions, saw a lot of movement between folk from the countries concerned.
Yet another nightmare that'll need the help of Y-DNA to sort out!
Cheers,
Bob
« Last Edit: July 29, 2012, 01:05:31 PM by Castlebob » Logged

Y-DNA: R1b1b2a1b P312+ Z245- Z2247- Z2245- Z196-  U152-  U106-  P66-  M65-  M37-  M222-  M153-  L459-  L21-  L176.2-  DF27-  DF19- L624+ (S389+)
mtDNA: U5b2b3
rms2
Board Moderator
Guru
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5023


« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2012, 01:56:28 PM »

It looks like, in general, they found U106 highest in the AFS (Authentic Flemish Surname) population, and P312* (which in this case included L21 and probably some other P312 subclades) and U152 highest in the FRS (French/Roman Surname) population. Of course, there was overlap of the y haplogroups in both populations, and the picture is not 100% either/or. Still, the results were fairly clear.

That supports what was found in Larmuseau et al (2012), which I think used data from the Brabant Project. I believe it found that U106 was prevalent among the Flemish-speaking population in Belgium, while U152 and P312* (of the same type, untested for L21 and other subclades) prevailed with the Walloons.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2012, 02:00:01 PM by rms2 » Logged

Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


SEO light theme by © Mustang forums. Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC

Page created in 0.08 seconds with 19 queries.