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Author Topic: The People of the British Isles exhibit July 2012  (Read 1552 times)
Jean M
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« on: June 18, 2012, 04:59:00 AM »

The People of the British Isles project has analysed DNA variation at 500,000 DNA positions in over 2,000 people from all over the UK, which can be compared with other European countries. This has provided an extraordinarily detailed genetic map of the genetic variation between groups of people from different parts of the UK and their relationships with other countries.

Lead scientist of the project, Professor Sir Walter Bodmer, presents the results at the Royal Society Summer Exhibition in London 3-8 July 2012. For those not able to make it, there is a genetic map online. This is the same one that I reported he showed in a lecture last year, and tried to describe. I regretted that I did not take my camera! But here it is.
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rms2
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« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2012, 07:22:51 PM »

I wish I could have my Family Finder results compared with the corresponding autosomal data in this project.

I haven't really looked at their web site much, so excuse me, but are they doing much with y-dna?
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Jean M
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« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2012, 05:00:20 AM »

A couple of questions have been asked and answered online at the exhibit website. I will re-post here:

Q Does you genetic Map show mtDNA or Y-DNA or specific sets of markers?

A Our map is based on about 600,000 genetic markers across the whole genome, excluding the mtDNA and Y-DNA for the time being.  mtDNA and Y-DNA will only show the history of those particular bits of the genome, whereas our analysis looks at the whole genome. We do have data on both mtDNA and Y-DNA that we plan to look at as well and compare to our current analysis but we haven't managed to do this yet.

Q Will the analysis allow you to identify various populations such as Celts, Saxons, Vikings, Mesolithic Settlers, Neolithic Settlers and have you any plans to integrate results from the Ireland DNA Atlas project to give a total picture for the Isles?

A By comparing our UK samples to other European Countries, we are able to get an understanding of the relative contributions these different Countries have had to the various genetic groups that we have found in the UK.  We can certainly define genetically distinct groups in the UK according to our analysis but assigning the differences to particular historical events  can be very difficult.  For example, the Norse Viking influence is obvious, whilst differentiating between the effect of Anglo-Saxon and Danish Viking invasions and the long term peopling of the southeast over the last 12,000 years is much harder to do.

You are right in that we do need to collaborate with other projects and researchers, in particular in Ireland, to get a fuller picture of the British Isles and this is something we hope to do sometime in the future.



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Heber
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« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2012, 08:01:27 AM »

Jean,

That was me who asked the second question. I am pleased that they are open to cooperation with the Irish DNA Atlas project (which I have joined).
That should give a better overall picture of the Isles.
Gerard
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Heber


 
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Jean M
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« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2012, 09:48:50 AM »

@ Heber

Certainly should get the two projects together. Thanks for asking that question, which I also wanted the answer to.
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Heber
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« Reply #5 on: June 27, 2012, 04:18:14 AM »

Below is an interesting article from the Telegraph on the findings.

By Harriet Cooke2:12PM BST 17 Jun 2012
Scientists drew up a map of the British Isles revealing the genetic ancestry of people from different rural areas across the UK.
After extensive DNA surveying, they found that Welsh and Cornish people were among the most genetically distinct groups in the country.
One theory for the difference in their DNA is that they are a "relic" population, tracing their ancestry back to the tribes that colonised Britain after the last Ice Age 10,000 years ago.
Welsh genes proved to be similar to those of the French and Irish, suggesting they were connected to the pre-Roman population.
The Cornish were also shown to have a distinctive DNA make-up, different to those from the neighbouring county Devon.

Peter Donnelly, professor of statistical science at Oxford University and director of the Wellcome Trust centre for human genetics, confirmed the distinctiveness of people from the two regions.
He said: "The people of Wales and Cornwall are different from the rest of southern and central England."
But the most genetically distinctive of all British people were those of the Orkneys, who were shown to have Scandinavian ancestry, dating back to when their islands were controlled by Vikings from AD875 to 1472.
It may come as a surprise to the people of Norfolk that their DNA was little different to those in the rest of the south.
Tradition has it that residents from the area are descended from the ancient Iceni tribe.
Some 2,000 rural dwellers were analysed in the survey, and all had to have four grandparents born in the same area.
Those in south east and central England were described by Donnelly as "a real genetic cocktail", with parts of their DNA matching the pre-Roman population, Anglo-Saxon and the Danish Viking settlers.
Donelly and his team will be presenting their work at the Royal Society's summer science exhibition, to be held in London on July 3 - 8.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-news/9336923/Welsh-and-Cornish-are-the-purest-Britons-scientists-claim.html
« Last Edit: June 27, 2012, 04:26:33 AM by Heber » Logged

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avalon
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« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2012, 08:13:11 AM »

The genetic map at the royal society is quite confusing, it would be really helpful if we had more information on the different colours and squares and circles. For instance, at first glance there appears to be a genetic similarity between South West Wales, Cumbria and Northumberland, but when you enlarge the jpg, South West Wales has orange circles whereas northern England has orange squares?

To make it even more confusing, there are two other maps (based on the same research) on the web that have different colourings again.

This one was first published in the Sunday Times I believe.

http://www.cornwall24.net/economy/cornish-are-most-ancient-of-britons/

The other is from Oxford Uni http://www.ox.ac.uk/media/news_stories/2012/120703.html

Rather ridiculously, Cornwall has a different colouring in each of the 3 maps!

The only consistency between the maps appears to be the red colouring that dominates much of England, which one can presume is from "Germanic" invaders/settlers?

Another criticism of mine is that the Royal Society map, and therefore the genetic study, appears to ignore a large part of Central Wales, Essex, Hertfordshire. The coverage in Scotland is also very sparse.






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