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Author Topic: Key for MDLP Admixture results?  (Read 1635 times)
Jason Bourgeois
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« on: July 07, 2012, 08:52:19 AM »

I have seen many MDLP admixture results, bearing such names as Paleo-Mediterranean, East European, Iberian, Paleo Balkanic, etc.

I am wondering if there is any key that describes what is meant by these populations, and which would give some clue as to how the results were obtained.
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SEJJ
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« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2012, 08:18:07 PM »

I have seen many MDLP admixture results, bearing such names as Paleo-Mediterranean, East European, Iberian, Paleo Balkanic, etc.

I am wondering if there is any key that describes what is meant by these populations, and which would give some clue as to how the results were obtained.

Generally speaking, these components are named after the populations in which they peak - Or after perceived ancestral elements in the populations that they peak in - But also there aren't clear borders between them as such, for example in Europe a Western European can expect to have a certain amount of the Eastern European component, and the same between north and south. As such the results should not be taken at face value, but compared to others of a known ancestry, and also to population averages - This will tell you where you 'fit in' with the populations used in making the calculator. There is a key on some of the calculators that show the geographic regions in which the components are most common, although this is not the case with all of them.
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Alpine
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« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2012, 01:22:56 PM »

I have seen many MDLP admixture results, bearing such names as Paleo-Mediterranean, East European, Iberian, Paleo Balkanic, etc.

I am wondering if there is any key that describes what is meant by these populations, and which would give some clue as to how the results were obtained.

Generally speaking, these components are named after the populations in which they peak - Or after perceived ancestral elements in the populations that they peak in - But also there aren't clear borders between them as such, for example in Europe a Western European can expect to have a certain amount of the Eastern European component, and the same between north and south. As such the results should not be taken at face value, but compared to others of a known ancestry, and also to population averages - This will tell you where you 'fit in' with the populations used in making the calculator. There is a key on some of the calculators that show the geographic regions in which the components are most common, although this is not the case with all of them.


so for me in which its stated 21% celto-germanic would represent a marker after the fall of the Roman Empire, as historical data clearly indicates that before this the celts and germanic people had not merged , be it in the alps or the british isles.
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YDna = T1a2b (L446)
MtDNA = H2a1c (haplofind)

SEJJ
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« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2012, 10:50:25 AM »

I have seen many MDLP admixture results, bearing such names as Paleo-Mediterranean, East European, Iberian, Paleo Balkanic, etc.

I am wondering if there is any key that describes what is meant by these populations, and which would give some clue as to how the results were obtained.

Generally speaking, these components are named after the populations in which they peak - Or after perceived ancestral elements in the populations that they peak in - But also there aren't clear borders between them as such, for example in Europe a Western European can expect to have a certain amount of the Eastern European component, and the same between north and south. As such the results should not be taken at face value, but compared to others of a known ancestry, and also to population averages - This will tell you where you 'fit in' with the populations used in making the calculator. There is a key on some of the calculators that show the geographic regions in which the components are most common, although this is not the case with all of them.


so for me in which its stated 21% celto-germanic would represent a marker after the fall of the Roman Empire, as historical data clearly indicates that before this the celts and germanic people had not merged , be it in the alps or the british isles.


I don't think it's reached that level of specificity as such - But presumably the Celto-Germanic component peaks in areas with the populations of primarily Celtic and Germanic stock, as the two have a long history and are also quite similar. But i guess you'd have to ask Vadim for a solid answer though :).
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Alpine
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2012, 09:20:11 PM »

I have seen many MDLP admixture results, bearing such names as Paleo-Mediterranean, East European, Iberian, Paleo Balkanic, etc.

I am wondering if there is any key that describes what is meant by these populations, and which would give some clue as to how the results were obtained.

Generally speaking, these components are named after the populations in which they peak - Or after perceived ancestral elements in the populations that they peak in - But also there aren't clear borders between them as such, for example in Europe a Western European can expect to have a certain amount of the Eastern European component, and the same between north and south. As such the results should not be taken at face value, but compared to others of a known ancestry, and also to population averages - This will tell you where you 'fit in' with the populations used in making the calculator. There is a key on some of the calculators that show the geographic regions in which the components are most common, although this is not the case with all of them.


so for me in which its stated 21% celto-germanic would represent a marker after the fall of the Roman Empire, as historical data clearly indicates that before this the celts and germanic people had not merged , be it in the alps or the british isles.


I don't think it's reached that level of specificity as such - But presumably the Celto-Germanic component peaks in areas with the populations of primarily Celtic and Germanic stock, as the two have a long history and are also quite similar. But i guess you'd have to ask Vadim for a solid answer though :).

I asked vadim yesterday , he stated :
Celto-Germanic is the modal componet in Western Europe

I think he only uses them to refer to areas of europe and not a time scale thing.


The celts and germans only merged after the fall of the Roman Empire, this merger in southern germany and austria was non germanic in roman times.

Its odd to this day the bavarians still use the original name bavaria for their region and not always the germanic name for bavaria which is Bayern
« Last Edit: November 17, 2012, 09:23:20 PM by Alpine » Logged

YDna = T1a2b (L446)
MtDNA = H2a1c (haplofind)

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