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Author Topic: Michael Wood's Story of England  (Read 1374 times)
razyn
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« on: July 04, 2012, 08:57:04 AM »

Here's a description of the series, the US premier of which was last night:

http://www.pbs.org/programs/michael-woods-story-england/

Episode 1, "Romans to Normans," included a DNA-swabbing incident about halfway through, and there was a closeup of Dr. Turi King chatting about R1a1 with one of the locals (in Kibworth, Leicestershire), who was gobsmacked.  (Discovery of the fact that his ancestors may have been Vikings may have been the partial cause of that.)  Dr. King, it was recently announced, has accepted the editorship of the online Journal of Genetic Genealogy, aka JOGG.  She's also a co-author of last year's Surnames, DNA and Family History (Oxford).  So that's about as near as we ever get to seeing the front line troops of our hobby featured in the mainstream media.  Too bad she got about thirty seconds of the program, but there it is.  It was otherwise an interesting program.  Nice to see DNA working its way into fairly casual conversations about ethnic heritage, these days.
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Matt Winters
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« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2012, 12:21:36 AM »

Love this program. It's not about a county to which I have a direct connection, but its focus on ordinary people is laudable. Just watched the second episode, which covers the initial plague years. It discloses an aspect of the aftermath that's very appealing: Ordinary villagers banded together to establish permanent endowments to pay for prayers for loved ones and the education of children. Highly recommend.
« Last Edit: July 05, 2012, 12:23:29 AM by Matt Winters » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2012, 01:02:30 AM »

Here's a description of the series, the US premier of which was last night:

http://www.pbs.org/programs/michael-woods-story-england/

Episode 1, "Romans to Normans," included a DNA-swabbing incident about halfway through, and there was a closeup of Dr. Turi King chatting about R1a1 with one of the locals (in Kibworth, Leicestershire), who was gobsmacked.  (Discovery of the fact that his ancestors may have been Vikings may have been the partial cause of that.)  Dr. King, it was recently announced, has accepted the editorship of the online Journal of Genetic Genealogy, aka JOGG.  She's also a co-author of last year's Surnames, DNA and Family History (Oxford).  So that's about as near as we ever get to seeing the front line troops of our hobby featured in the mainstream media.  Too bad she got about thirty seconds of the program, but there it is.  It was otherwise an interesting program.  Nice to see DNA working its way into fairly casual conversations about ethnic heritage, these days.

Thank you for the link. If I learned anything from this, it's to avoid Smeeton at all costs. Seriously, it is wonderful to see history prove how awful the Normans are. Hope my DNA does not connect me to some Norman tyrant.

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Mike Walsh
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« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2012, 01:09:18 AM »

Here's a description of the series, the US premier of which was last night:

http://www.pbs.org/programs/michael-woods-story-england/

Episode 1, "Romans to Normans," included a DNA-swabbing incident about halfway through, and there was a closeup of Dr. Turi King chatting about R1a1 with one of the locals (in Kibworth, Leicestershire), who was gobsmacked.  (Discovery of the fact that his ancestors may have been Vikings may have been the partial cause of that.)  Dr. King, it was recently announced, has accepted the editorship of the online Journal of Genetic Genealogy, aka JOGG.  She's also a co-author of last year's Surnames, DNA and Family History (Oxford).  So that's about as near as we ever get to seeing the front line troops of our hobby featured in the mainstream media.  Too bad she got about thirty seconds of the program, but there it is.  It was otherwise an interesting program.  Nice to see DNA working its way into fairly casual conversations about ethnic heritage, these days.

Thank you for the link. If I learned anything from this, it's to avoid Smeeton at all costs. Seriously, it is wonderful to see history prove how awful the Normans are. Hope my DNA does not connect me to some Norman tyrant.

Arch

It all depends on you point of view but I'll bet the Normans were only of average cruelty, as far as tyrants go.
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eochaidh
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« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2012, 05:05:49 PM »

Here's a description of the series, the US premier of which was last night:

http://www.pbs.org/programs/michael-woods-story-england/

Episode 1, "Romans to Normans," included a DNA-swabbing incident about halfway through, and there was a closeup of Dr. Turi King chatting about R1a1 with one of the locals (in Kibworth, Leicestershire), who was gobsmacked.  (Discovery of the fact that his ancestors may have been Vikings may have been the partial cause of that.)  Dr. King, it was recently announced, has accepted the editorship of the online Journal of Genetic Genealogy, aka JOGG.  She's also a co-author of last year's Surnames, DNA and Family History (Oxford).  So that's about as near as we ever get to seeing the front line troops of our hobby featured in the mainstream media.  Too bad she got about thirty seconds of the program, but there it is.  It was otherwise an interesting program.  Nice to see DNA working its way into fairly casual conversations about ethnic heritage, these days.

Thank you for the link. If I learned anything from this, it's to avoid Smeeton at all costs. Seriously, it is wonderful to see history prove how awful the Normans are. Hope my DNA does not connect me to some Norman tyrant.

Arch

It all depends on you point of view but I'll bet the Normans were only of average cruelty, as far as tyrants go.

The Normans killed me and my entire family, including my cats.

I may have this wrong...
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Arch Y.
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« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2012, 02:23:23 AM »

Here's a description of the series, the US premier of which was last night:

http://www.pbs.org/programs/michael-woods-story-england/

Episode 1, "Romans to Normans," included a DNA-swabbing incident about halfway through, and there was a closeup of Dr. Turi King chatting about R1a1 with one of the locals (in Kibworth, Leicestershire), who was gobsmacked.  (Discovery of the fact that his ancestors may have been Vikings may have been the partial cause of that.)  Dr. King, it was recently announced, has accepted the editorship of the online Journal of Genetic Genealogy, aka JOGG.  She's also a co-author of last year's Surnames, DNA and Family History (Oxford).  So that's about as near as we ever get to seeing the front line troops of our hobby featured in the mainstream media.  Too bad she got about thirty seconds of the program, but there it is.  It was otherwise an interesting program.  Nice to see DNA working its way into fairly casual conversations about ethnic heritage, these days.

Thank you for the link. If I learned anything from this, it's to avoid Smeeton at all costs. Seriously, it is wonderful to see history prove how awful the Normans are. Hope my DNA does not connect me to some Norman tyrant.

Arch

It all depends on you point of view but I'll bet the Normans were only of average cruelty, as far as tyrants go.

The way I see it is that Normans would considered themselves knights in shining armor or of higher nobility. Historically, knights were the equivalent of the mafia. They were brutal to peasants and the historical record does show a changing way of life during the period of Norman rule. I have a copy of the Domesday book and I scoured the hell out of that thing looking for any traces of my family surname, and found none (whew!). However, what I did notice was a term I became fascinated with "Villein". I hardly find any "freeman" and especially those mentioned as libri homini mediocre or something to that effect. Though feudalism has its roots in manorial society from an earlier period, perhaps influenced from Charlemagne or earlier. In my opinion, the Normans perfected it that concept in the age of feudalism. It was a miserable time for anybody not of Norman royal or noble lineage, and as much as the History Channel wants to make the Crusades a shifting point from the dark ages to an age of light, the Normans were around to ensure that Britain didn't see the light for a little while longer until the Plantagenet reign.

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Arch Y.
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« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2012, 02:27:51 AM »

Here's a description of the series, the US premier of which was last night:

http://www.pbs.org/programs/michael-woods-story-england/

Episode 1, "Romans to Normans," included a DNA-swabbing incident about halfway through, and there was a closeup of Dr. Turi King chatting about R1a1 with one of the locals (in Kibworth, Leicestershire), who was gobsmacked.  (Discovery of the fact that his ancestors may have been Vikings may have been the partial cause of that.)  Dr. King, it was recently announced, has accepted the editorship of the online Journal of Genetic Genealogy, aka JOGG.  She's also a co-author of last year's Surnames, DNA and Family History (Oxford).  So that's about as near as we ever get to seeing the front line troops of our hobby featured in the mainstream media.  Too bad she got about thirty seconds of the program, but there it is.  It was otherwise an interesting program.  Nice to see DNA working its way into fairly casual conversations about ethnic heritage, these days.

Thank you for the link. If I learned anything from this, it's to avoid Smeeton at all costs. Seriously, it is wonderful to see history prove how awful the Normans are. Hope my DNA does not connect me to some Norman tyrant.

Arch

It all depends on you point of view but I'll bet the Normans were only of average cruelty, as far as tyrants go.

The Normans killed me and my entire family, including my cats.

I may have this wrong...

See! I told you they were tyrants.

Arch
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Castlebob
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« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2012, 03:55:53 AM »

Many need to be careful with assuming they are/aren't Normans. The de Neville family were at one stage chief foresters of England, but some associated with that branch were actuallly 'native' Gospatrics !
Also, in the early days of surnames, I've found cases in Cumberland where one brother followed his father's surname, whereas another took his mother's village as his surname.
We are all aware that traditional Norman Christian names often replaced the older, established first names, further muddying the waters.
I believe that in the south & midlands of England  Normans tended initially to marry amongst their own, but in the far north, unions with locals were more commonplace. Obviously, as the years rolled by, intermingling became  the norm.
Nothing's ever straightforward!
Cheers,
Bob
PS I think my wife has some Norman blood in her as she's often 'harrying' me!
« Last Edit: July 09, 2012, 05:44:17 AM by Castlebob » Logged

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razyn
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« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2012, 04:07:40 PM »

I have a copy of the Domesday book and I scoured the hell out of that thing looking for any traces of my family surname

I've been meaning to reply to this, but it keeps slipping my mind -- everybody has a copy, it's free online and very interesting to look at:

http://domesdaymap.co.uk/
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cmblandford
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« Reply #9 on: September 27, 2012, 12:43:09 PM »



I have a copy of the Domesday book and I scoured the hell out of that thing looking for any traces of my family surname

I've been meaning to reply to this, but it keeps slipping my mind -- everybody has a copy, it's free online and very interesting to look at:

http://domesdaymap.co.uk/

Very interesting indeed.

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Surname Project:  Blandford

Kit:  ft115893   Ysearch:  EYSPZ


Earliest Known Ancestor:  Thomas Blanford; Dorset, England; born 1648


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