World Families Forums - R1b in Western Germany (incl. U106 and U152)

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Author Topic: R1b in Western Germany (incl. U106 and U152)  (Read 730 times)
Richard Rocca
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« on: June 15, 2012, 09:38:44 PM »

Since I can't find any mention of it on the forums, I'm assuming this may have fallen through the cracks because it was written in German:

Schönefeld et al. (2010) Further discrimination of the Y-chromosomal haplogroup R1b* in Western German populations

http://www.freidok.uni-freiburg.de/volltexte/7512/

Abstract:
Y-chromosomal binary polymorphisms have proven to be a useful and reliable tool for population genetic analysis. Their genetic diversity can be used to provide information on male-specific patterns of migration in the past and the origin and diversity of specific population. Haplogroup R1b1* - defined by Y-SNP P25- is the most common haplogroup in western european populations. German populations show this haplogroup with usually very high frequencies (e.g. 0.55 in Freiburg i. Br. and 0.4 in Muenster). To further discriminate this haplogroup five additional SNPs – M222, M269, U106, U152 and U198- where analysed in samples comprising haplogroup R1b1* from several western german populations.
The marker P25 was found to be not reliable for typing of haplogroup R1b* due to recurrent mutations and duplication of the locus. Thus, a retyping of R1b* by the markers M343 and P297 was necessary. In 108 of the 130 samples, amplification of both multiplex reaction for typing Y-chromosomal binary polymorphisms was successful. From the chosen set of markers, 7 different haplogroups (HG) could have been observed. Among the samples investigated, four haplogroups were found. In the populations of Münster and Freiburg, R1b1b2g* was found to be the most common haplogroup while in Mainz, R1b1b2* showed the highest frequency.The analysis of Y-chromosomal binary markers could successfully be amplified in a 6 µL reaction volume. Thus, the technique presented here is a reliable and economic way for typing Y-chromosomal SNPs. A typing strategy was established that allows to perform the amplification, sequencing and electrophoretic analysis in a single well using a reduced volume PCR approach. Multiplex PCR is performed in 6 µL using 96 well reaction plates. By reducing the reaction volume, the analysis of Y-chromosomal SNPs becomes much more economic especially when it is combined with a multiplex approach. Reduction of the costs is interesting when working in the field of population genetics, because large numbers of samples have to be analysed.

Some frequencies:

Freiburg im Breisgau (n = 61)
U106 = 34.43%
U152 = 22.95%
R1b1a2 (xU106,U152) = 27.87%

Mainz (n = 34)
U106 = 17.65%
U152 = 11.76%
R1b1a2 (xU106,U152) = 26.47%

Münster (n = 35)
U106 = 48.57%
U152 = 17.14%
R1b1a2 (xU106,U152) = 34.29%

West Germany "All" (n = 130) 
U106 = 33.85%
U152 = 18.46%
R1b1a2 (xU106,U152) = 29.23%

Some initial thoughts:

1. Only 130 samples were tested.
2. The U106 frequency for Münster is 48.57% (n=35) which is higher than Busby's Friesland, Netherlands samples of 42.6% (n=94) and Larmuseau's (2010) Noord-Brabant samples of 35.38% (n=128). Of caution is the smaller sample sizes of this study, but it is still interesting to see U106 so high across the border from the Netherlands.
3. R1b1a2 (xU106,U152) is a close second to U106 in frequency. Obviously it is made up of M269*, L11*, L21+, DF27+, etc. Based on Busby's data, when the known markers in Germany are tested for, U152 is the second most frequent subclade of R1b.
4. In all, the R1b frequency in the three Western Germany locations studied here is very high (83%).
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Paternal: R1b-U152+L2*
Maternal: H
whoknows
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« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2012, 07:30:46 AM »

Well if, as some insist, all R U106 in Britain is a result of a Dark-Age expansion from the region of the Friesians then would it not be safe to speculate that the seemingly high frequencies of the Haplogroup in Germany, as noted in this albeit limited study, can be explained by incursions from the Netherlands, just a spear's throw away, compared to the North Sea crossing to the Isles?

Although, did not a couple of years back Tom Gull release some interesting findings on R U106 as having higher frequencies in the south of Germany, Austria and parts of Switzerland? Suggesting the possibility that such a movement may in fact have been south to north along the Rhine, undermining to a degree the mindset that declares the Netherlands as the origin for the Haplogroup in Britain and presumably Germany too?
« Last Edit: June 16, 2012, 07:37:09 AM by whoknows » Logged
Jean M
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« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2012, 07:36:18 AM »

Glad you have found some more data points Rich.
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alan trowel hands.
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« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2012, 01:08:23 PM »

Since I can't find any mention of it on the forums, I'm assuming this may have fallen through the cracks because it was written in German:

Schönefeld et al. (2010) Further discrimination of the Y-chromosomal haplogroup R1b* in Western German populations

http://www.freidok.uni-freiburg.de/volltexte/7512/

Abstract:
Y-chromosomal binary polymorphisms have proven to be a useful and reliable tool for population genetic analysis. Their genetic diversity can be used to provide information on male-specific patterns of migration in the past and the origin and diversity of specific population. Haplogroup R1b1* - defined by Y-SNP P25- is the most common haplogroup in western european populations. German populations show this haplogroup with usually very high frequencies (e.g. 0.55 in Freiburg i. Br. and 0.4 in Muenster). To further discriminate this haplogroup five additional SNPs – M222, M269, U106, U152 and U198- where analysed in samples comprising haplogroup R1b1* from several western german populations.
The marker P25 was found to be not reliable for typing of haplogroup R1b* due to recurrent mutations and duplication of the locus. Thus, a retyping of R1b* by the markers M343 and P297 was necessary. In 108 of the 130 samples, amplification of both multiplex reaction for typing Y-chromosomal binary polymorphisms was successful. From the chosen set of markers, 7 different haplogroups (HG) could have been observed. Among the samples investigated, four haplogroups were found. In the populations of Münster and Freiburg, R1b1b2g* was found to be the most common haplogroup while in Mainz, R1b1b2* showed the highest frequency.The analysis of Y-chromosomal binary markers could successfully be amplified in a 6 µL reaction volume. Thus, the technique presented here is a reliable and economic way for typing Y-chromosomal SNPs. A typing strategy was established that allows to perform the amplification, sequencing and electrophoretic analysis in a single well using a reduced volume PCR approach. Multiplex PCR is performed in 6 µL using 96 well reaction plates. By reducing the reaction volume, the analysis of Y-chromosomal SNPs becomes much more economic especially when it is combined with a multiplex approach. Reduction of the costs is interesting when working in the field of population genetics, because large numbers of samples have to be analysed.

Some frequencies:

Freiburg im Breisgau (n = 61)
U106 = 34.43%
U152 = 22.95%
R1b1a2 (xU106,U152) = 27.87%

Mainz (n = 34)
U106 = 17.65%
U152 = 11.76%
R1b1a2 (xU106,U152) = 26.47%

Münster (n = 35)
U106 = 48.57%
U152 = 17.14%
R1b1a2 (xU106,U152) = 34.29%

West Germany "All" (n = 130) 
U106 = 33.85%
U152 = 18.46%
R1b1a2 (xU106,U152) = 29.23%

Some initial thoughts:

1. Only 130 samples were tested.
2. The U106 frequency for Münster is 48.57% (n=35) which is higher than Busby's Friesland, Netherlands samples of 42.6% (n=94) and Larmuseau's (2010) Noord-Brabant samples of 35.38% (n=128). Of caution is the smaller sample sizes of this study, but it is still interesting to see U106 so high across the border from the Netherlands.
3. R1b1a2 (xU106,U152) is a close second to U106 in frequency. Obviously it is made up of M269*, L11*, L21+, DF27+, etc. Based on Busby's data, when the known markers in Germany are tested for, U152 is the second most frequent subclade of R1b.
4. In all, the R1b frequency in the three Western Germany locations studied here is very high (83%).


That is very interesting or worrying out of step with other stats depending on how you look at it.
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Richard Rocca
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« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2012, 05:55:45 PM »

That is very interesting or worrying out of step with other stats depending on how you look at it.

Unfortunately I may have misread the stats and the numbers might be a percentage of R1b. I will re-read it and re-post.
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Paternal: R1b-U152+L2*
Maternal: H
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