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Author Topic: Any Word on Where and When the Next Ancient Y-DNA Results are Expected?  (Read 13876 times)
Jean M
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« Reply #75 on: July 14, 2012, 11:11:11 AM »

The two mtDNA C at Yasinovatka in the study, Prehistoric populations of Ukraine:
Migration at the later Mesolithic to Neolithic transition
, appear to be two of the three mentioned in another study, Mitochondrial haplogroup C in ancient mitochondrial DNA from Ukraine extends the presence of East Eurasian genetic lineages in Neolithic Central and Eastern Europe.

That's right. Although Lillie et al has come out later, Nikitin 2012 is actually the study that Lillie et al refers to as the full study in preparation. Nikitin 2012 rejected several results because of failure to replicate, including the two T results, and gave full details of the others, so that they were able to determine that one of the C results was C4a2. I have just added the extra results from Lillie to my table, but with the warning re replication from Nikitin 2012.    
« Last Edit: July 14, 2012, 11:12:11 AM by Jean M » Logged
princenuadha
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« Reply #76 on: July 16, 2012, 07:37:45 PM »

Golly! Am I glad this came out while I can still fix what I say about mtDNA U2e. 

What was your previous theory and what adjustments do you have to make?

I know u2e is really important to indo European history given its geographic specific-ness and presence in both BB and Andronovo sites.
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Jean M
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« Reply #77 on: July 17, 2012, 12:09:38 PM »

I can't recall my previous text exactly. I pointed out that U2e is estimated to be much older than PIE, but I didn't have any earlier sighting of it in aDNA. Now that we do, I have made the point more strongly that it is pre-PIE and probably cropped up in hunter-gatherers roaming the steppe and forest-steppe both sides of the Urals. We have mtDNA from the Altai 5500 BC and U2e does not appear there. Not proof of course. It is rare and might turn up in a larger sample. Still I am inclined to see it as arising from the U2 that we know was around the western end of the steppe earlier.
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Heber
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« Reply #78 on: July 18, 2012, 05:20:58 PM »

From the earliest modern humans to the onset of farming (45,000-4,500 BP

This project, an extension of the previously mentioned BEAN project will use aDNA, Y, mtDNA, Autosomal and craniometric data.
"This project which is led by Ron Pinhasi and is carried out in collaboration with leading European scientists, investigates the evolution and nature of major prehistoric processes which are key to our understanding of what happened in European prehistory: the origins and spread of modern humans during the Late Pleistocene, their survival during the last Ice Age, post-glacial expansions, the emergence of the first agricultural societies and the decline and eventual disappearance of most hunter-gatherer societies in Europe.
The colonisation of Europe by anatomically modern humans (AMHs) ca. 45,000 years before present (BP) and the transition to farming ca. 8,000 BP are two major events in human prehistory. Both events involved certain cultural and biological adaptations, technological innovations, and behavioural plasticity which are unique to our species. The reconstruction of these processes and the causality between them has so far remained elusive due to technological, methodological and logistical complexities.
Major developments in our understanding of the anthropology of the Upper Palaeolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic, and advances in ancient DNA (aDNA) technology and chronometric methods now allow us to assess in sufficient resolution the interface between these evolutionary processes, and changes in human culture and behaviour.
The project investigates the complex interface between the morphological, genetic, behavioural, and cultural factors that shaped the population history of European AMHs."

https://sites.google.com/site/pinhasierc/home
 

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Richard Rocca
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« Reply #79 on: August 01, 2012, 01:45:43 PM »

It would be nice if the archaeologists from the University of Bristol send the remains for DNA analysis:

Une chambre funéraire vieille de 5000 ans découverte sous le mégalithe de Trefael
http://www.maxisciences.com/pr%EF%BF%BDhistoire/une-chambre-funeraire-vieille-de-5000-ans-decouverte-sous-le-megalithe-de-trefael_mrm105926.html
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Jean M
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« Reply #80 on: August 01, 2012, 03:52:00 PM »

@ Richard Rocca.

I have no influence there I'm afraid.
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Heber
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« Reply #81 on: August 01, 2012, 05:37:20 PM »

The article indicates that it is one of the oldest Neolithic sites in Wales and Europe dating to 5,000 years built in proximity to a previous Mesolithic site dating to 10,000 years. The bones will be exhumed and examined in September of this year. A rare and exciting find indeed. Below ia a link to an English language article on the site. It mentions radiocarbon dating. I could not find a reference to DNA testing however it does mention acid soil which may preclude testing.

"Leurs résultats suggèrent qu'il pourrait s'agir du plus ancien site funéraire rituel du néolithique au Pays de Galles et l'un des plus anciens en Europe de l'Ouest?..
Les perles suggèrent que l'emplacement peut être associé à des sépultures, bien avant même la construction de la chambre funéraire; elles pourraient être liées à un site du Mésolithique à proximité datant de 10 000 ans...
D'après le Dr Nash: "ce que nous avons trouvé est extrêmement rare." En septembre 2012, le Dr Nash et son équipe pourront retirer les os pour analyse."

http://thehobgoblin.blogspot.ie/2012/05/trefael-stone.html

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rms2
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« Reply #82 on: August 02, 2012, 07:16:59 AM »

Hopefully they could get testable dna from the teeth, despite the acid soil.

I know megalithic tombs and structures are widespread throughout the world, but here we are talking about the little northwestern corner of Europe. Not too awfully far away is the Dolmen of La Pierre Fritte. The two males found there were both I-P37.2 (predicted from STRs). Trefael is a bit older than La Pierre Fritte, but not too much.

Are the male remains at Trefael I-P37.2, as well?
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Richard Rocca
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« Reply #83 on: August 02, 2012, 08:27:16 AM »

Hopefully they could get testable dna from the teeth, despite the acid soil.

I know megalithic tombs and structures are widespread throughout the world, but here we are talking about the little northwestern corner of Europe. Not too awfully far away is the Dolmen of La Pierre Fritte. The two males found there were both I-P37.2 (predicted from STRs). Trefael is a bit older than La Pierre Fritte, but not too much.

Are the male remains at Trefael I-P37.2, as well?

Rich, if I'm not mistaken, they were both I1b2 (M26).
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rms2
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« Reply #84 on: August 02, 2012, 08:37:59 AM »

Hopefully they could get testable dna from the teeth, despite the acid soil.

I know megalithic tombs and structures are widespread throughout the world, but here we are talking about the little northwestern corner of Europe. Not too awfully far away is the Dolmen of La Pierre Fritte. The two males found there were both I-P37.2 (predicted from STRs). Trefael is a bit older than La Pierre Fritte, but not too much.

Are the male remains at Trefael I-P37.2, as well?

Rich, if I'm not mistaken, they were both I1b2 (M26).

I think that was the two I2a at Treilles, although it wouldn't surprise me if the two at La Pierre Fritte were also I-M26.
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Richard Rocca
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« Reply #85 on: August 02, 2012, 08:45:54 AM »

Hopefully they could get testable dna from the teeth, despite the acid soil.

I know megalithic tombs and structures are widespread throughout the world, but here we are talking about the little northwestern corner of Europe. Not too awfully far away is the Dolmen of La Pierre Fritte. The two males found there were both I-P37.2 (predicted from STRs). Trefael is a bit older than La Pierre Fritte, but not too much.

Are the male remains at Trefael I-P37.2, as well?

Rich, if I'm not mistaken, they were both I1b2 (M26).

I think that was the two I2a at Treilles, although it wouldn't surprise me if the two at La Pierre Fritte were also I-M26.

I just looked at the La Pierre Fritte paper again and they were indeed I1b2 (M26).
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rms2
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« Reply #86 on: August 02, 2012, 11:48:37 AM »

Hopefully they could get testable dna from the teeth, despite the acid soil.

I know megalithic tombs and structures are widespread throughout the world, but here we are talking about the little northwestern corner of Europe. Not too awfully far away is the Dolmen of La Pierre Fritte. The two males found there were both I-P37.2 (predicted from STRs). Trefael is a bit older than La Pierre Fritte, but not too much.

Are the male remains at Trefael I-P37.2, as well?

Rich, if I'm not mistaken, they were both I1b2 (M26).

I think that was the two I2a at Treilles, although it wouldn't surprise me if the two at La Pierre Fritte were also I-M26.

I just looked at the La Pierre Fritte paper again and they were indeed I1b2 (M26).

Thanks, Rich!

I will update my map.
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