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Author Topic: Any Word on Where and When the Next Ancient Y-DNA Results are Expected?  (Read 17156 times)
Jean M
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« Reply #25 on: June 08, 2012, 07:16:05 AM »

Wow! I2a1 relatively late (2,800 BC) and well into the modern day R1b heartland...and from a dolmen no less. This is a very exciting find indeed.

Why? Lacan found two I2a1 at the 3000 BC site at Treilles, Aveyron (along with a mass of G2a) which were securely identified on SNP. The two I2a1 at La Pierre Fritte were only predicted on STRs. So the two from Treilles are more important, and were published in 2011. I have included the two from  La Pierre Fritte in my online table and will mention them in a footnote in my text, but solid identification by SNP is to be preferred if we have them.  

« Last Edit: June 08, 2012, 07:38:49 AM by Jean M » Logged
rms2
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« Reply #26 on: June 08, 2012, 08:02:31 AM »

I don't presume to speak for Rich Rocca, but for myself I would say the La Pierre Fritte I2a1 remains are particularly exciting because of their connection to a dolmen, that is, to a type of megalithic tomb. Isn't this the first instance of y-dna from a megalithic tomb?

Two results from a dolmen aren't much, but they aren't nothing either. They are a tantalizing hint that perhaps the Neolithic men who built the megaliths were I2a1; well, at least some of them probably were.

The two R1b (xU106) remains from Kromsdorf were exciting for a similar reason, because they could be identified as Beaker Folk and not merely because of their age or location.

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« Reply #27 on: June 08, 2012, 08:49:42 AM »

Isn't this the first instance of y-dna from a megalithic tomb?

Yes that is true. The results from Péré tumulus C, Prissé-la-Charrière (4000 BC) were only mtDNA. I have updated my megaliths page.

Have to say though that megalithic tombs are found over most of Eurasia right into the Far East and stone circles are found in part of Africa as well as Europe and the Near East.  Building them was not a culture in itself. They were favoured by Neolithic farming societies. Given the limited spread of I2a1, I think we can guess that only a tiny proportion of such monuments were built by men carrying I2a1.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2012, 09:19:34 AM by Jean M » Logged
Richard Rocca
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« Reply #28 on: June 08, 2012, 10:10:30 AM »

From Rootsi et al (2004):

"The exceptionally high incidence of I1b2 (M26) in the "archaic zone" of Sardinia can be explained by the presence of I1b2 chromosomes among the first humans who colonized the island, ∼9,000 years ago, followed by isolation and genetic drift."

In the case of I-M26, we need not worry about SNP prediction based on STR values. The YCIIa value for I-M26 is a whopping 10 repeats less than the haplogroup I modal (11 repeats as opposed to 21 repeats).

It would be interesting to see if ancient Y-DNA shows a separation between those that built megaliths as opposed to those who built menhirs. In the island of Corsica, which has a majority of R1b-L11 and where I-M26 is non-existent, menhirs start appearing in the Late Neolithic and Early Bronze age.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2012, 10:11:11 AM by Richard Rocca » Logged

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Heber
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« Reply #29 on: June 08, 2012, 12:07:55 PM »

Just published a new paper on a DNA found from Ukeraine.

Mitochondrial haplogroup C in ancient mitochondrial DNA from Ukraine extends the presence of East Eurasian genetic lineages in Neolithic Central and Eastern Europe

Recent studies of ancient mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages have revealed the presence of East Eurasian mtDNA haplogroups in the Central European Neolithic. Here we report the finding of East Eurasian lineages in ancient mtDNA from two Neolithic cemeteries of the North Pontic Region (NPR) in Ukraine. In our study, comprehensive haplotyping information was obtained for 7 out of 18 specimens. Although the majority of identified mtDNA haplogroups belonged to the traditional West Eurasian lineages of H and U, three specimens were determined to belong to the lineages of mtDNA haplogroup C. This find extends the presence of East Eurasian lineages in Neolithic Europe from the Carpathian Mountains to the northern shores of the Black Sea and provides the first genetic account of Neolithic mtDNA lineages from the NPR.

http://www.nature.com/jhg/journal/vaop/ncurrent/abs/jhg201269a.html
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rms2
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« Reply #30 on: June 08, 2012, 01:34:07 PM »

Isn't this the first instance of y-dna from a megalithic tomb?

Yes that is true. The results from Péré tumulus C, Prissé-la-Charrière (4000 BC) were only mtDNA. I have updated my megaliths page.

Have to say though that megalithic tombs are found over most of Eurasia right into the Far East and stone circles are found in part of Africa as well as Europe and the Near East.  Building them was not a culture in itself. They were favoured by Neolithic farming societies. Given the limited spread of I2a1, I think we can guess that only a tiny proportion of such monuments were built by men carrying I2a1.

I really had in mind the megalithic tombs that occur from the western Mediterranean into the British Isles.

One of the things I recall from reading Coons is that he said the bodies in them were mostly of a small, gracile, long-headed, Mediterranean type. In the British Isles, this physical type preceded the physical type represented by the Beaker Folk.

If Coons was right, and the remains connected with the megalithic tombs in western Europe were predominantly of a single, Mediterranean physical type, then one might reasonably conclude they were pretty much the same people. The recent Neolithic y-dna finds, including those from the La Pierre Fritte dolmen, have all been either I2a, G2a, or E1b1b (with the exception of one F*, as I recall). Those haplogroups are much more common in the Mediterranean region than they are in NW Europe. So far, we have the remains of a Neolithic people of a single Mediterranean physical type whose males are testing positive for Mediterranean y haplogroups.

It seems to me a reasonable working hypothesis might be that the Neolithic settlers of western Europe were generally of this Mediterranean type, that the Mediterranean littoral was their ultimate source, and that the males were generally of the same combination of y haplogroups, which did not include R1b.

So, where was R1b (by which I mean probably R-L11)?

Was it yet to arrive in western Europe or just beginning to arrive? Or was it in retreat as a part of the remnant of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers, hiding out, waiting for its ultimate resurgence and demographic triumph?

I think the two Beaker men from Kromsdorf give us a clue to the answer.

« Last Edit: June 08, 2012, 01:56:34 PM by rms2 » Logged

secherbernard
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« Reply #31 on: June 08, 2012, 02:32:52 PM »

Isn't this the first instance of y-dna from a megalithic tomb?

Yes that is true. The results from Péré tumulus C, Prissé-la-Charrière (4000 BC) were only mtDNA. I have updated my megaliths page.

Have to say though that megalithic tombs are found over most of Eurasia right into the Far East and stone circles are found in part of Africa as well as Europe and the Near East.  Building them was not a culture in itself. They were favoured by Neolithic farming societies. Given the limited spread of I2a1, I think we can guess that only a tiny proportion of such monuments were built by men carrying I2a1.

I really had in mind the megalithic tombs that occur from the western Mediterranean into the British Isles.

One of the things I recall from reading Coons is that he said the bodies in them were mostly of a small, gracile, long-headed, Mediterranean type. In the British Isles, this physical type preceded the physical type represented by the Beaker Folk.

If Coons was right, and the remains connected with the megalithic tombs in western Europe were predominantly of a single, Mediterranean physical type, then one might reasonably conclude they were pretty much the same people. The recent Neolithic y-dna finds, including those from the La Pierre Fritte dolmen, have all been either I2a, G2a, or E1b1b (with the exception of one F*, as I recall). Those haplogroups are much more common in the Mediterranean region than they are in NW Europe. So far, we have the remains of a Neolithic people of a single Mediterranean physical type whose males are testing positive for Mediterranean y haplogroups.

It seems to me a reasonable working hypothesis might be that the Neolithic settlers of western Europe were generally of this Mediterranean type, that the Mediterranean littoral was their ultimate source, and that the males were generally of the same combination of y haplogroups, which did not include R1b.

So, where was R1b (by which I mean probably R-L11)?

Was it yet to arrive in western Europe or just beginning to arrive? Or was it in retreat as a part of the remnant of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers, hiding out, waiting for its ultimate resurgence and demographic triumph?

I think the two Beaker men from Kromsdorf give us a clue to the answer.
I agree with you, Rich, on mediterranean origine of megalithic people. The recent paper of ancient autosomal DNA in Sweden from Skoglund et al. shows us that megalithic people of the Funnel Beaker culture were of mediterranean origine.
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« Reply #32 on: June 08, 2012, 03:19:03 PM »

Isn't this the first instance of y-dna from a megalithic tomb?

Yes that is true. The results from Péré tumulus C, Prissé-la-Charrière (4000 BC) were only mtDNA. I have updated my megaliths page.

Have to say though that megalithic tombs are found over most of Eurasia right into the Far East and stone circles are found in part of Africa as well as Europe and the Near East.  Building them was not a culture in itself. They were favoured by Neolithic farming societies. Given the limited spread of I2a1, I think we can guess that only a tiny proportion of such monuments were built by men carrying I2a1.

I really had in mind the megalithic tombs that occur from the western Mediterranean into the British Isles.

One of the things I recall from reading Coons is that he said the bodies in them were mostly of a small, gracile, long-headed, Mediterranean type. In the British Isles, this physical type preceded the physical type represented by the Beaker Folk.

If Coons was right, and the remains connected with the megalithic tombs in western Europe were predominantly of a single, Mediterranean physical type, then one might reasonably conclude they were pretty much the same people. The recent Neolithic y-dna finds, including those from the La Pierre Fritte dolmen, have all been either I2a, G2a, or E1b1b (with the exception of one F*, as I recall). Those haplogroups are much more common in the Mediterranean region than they are in NW Europe. So far, we have the remains of a Neolithic people of a single Mediterranean physical type whose males are testing positive for Mediterranean y haplogroups.

It seems to me a reasonable working hypothesis might be that the Neolithic settlers of western Europe were generally of this Mediterranean type, that the Mediterranean littoral was their ultimate source, and that the males were generally of the same combination of y haplogroups, which did not include R1b.

So, where was R1b (by which I mean probably R-L11)?

Was it yet to arrive in western Europe or just beginning to arrive? Or was it in retreat as a part of the remnant of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers, hiding out, waiting for its ultimate resurgence and demographic triumph?

I think the two Beaker men from Kromsdorf give us a clue to the answer.


Coon did differentiate between the Megalithic and the Danubian Neolithic types.  The former, although 'Mediterranean' in a general sense, were taller and even more longer skulled.  This is somewhat like the Corded type except the vault was not as high in the Megalithics.  I don't know how much bearing this has in terms of hg's. Possibly indigenous I2's acquiring gracile admixture from incoming neolithics is my first impression for this larger megalithic mediterranean type.

It stills looks like R1b is a late arrival meaning late neolithic and later.  The studies thus far do not look good for the Mesolithic R1b continuity argument in western Europe.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2012, 03:20:47 PM by MHammers » Logged

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rms2
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« Reply #33 on: June 08, 2012, 07:43:03 PM »

BTW, I meant Coon (as in Carleton Coon), not Coons.

I used to work with a guy named Ken Coons, so Coon became Coons inadvertently.
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« Reply #34 on: June 08, 2012, 07:45:19 PM »

. . .

It stills looks like R1b is a late arrival meaning late neolithic and later.  The studies thus far do not look good for the Mesolithic R1b continuity argument in western Europe.

I agree. I mentioned the Mesolithic hunter-gatherers to be fair to those who hold that position.
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rms2
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« Reply #35 on: June 08, 2012, 07:46:21 PM »

Isn't this the first instance of y-dna from a megalithic tomb?

Yes that is true. The results from Péré tumulus C, Prissé-la-Charrière (4000 BC) were only mtDNA. I have updated my megaliths page.

Have to say though that megalithic tombs are found over most of Eurasia right into the Far East and stone circles are found in part of Africa as well as Europe and the Near East.  Building them was not a culture in itself. They were favoured by Neolithic farming societies. Given the limited spread of I2a1, I think we can guess that only a tiny proportion of such monuments were built by men carrying I2a1.

I really had in mind the megalithic tombs that occur from the western Mediterranean into the British Isles.

One of the things I recall from reading Coons is that he said the bodies in them were mostly of a small, gracile, long-headed, Mediterranean type. In the British Isles, this physical type preceded the physical type represented by the Beaker Folk.

If Coons was right, and the remains connected with the megalithic tombs in western Europe were predominantly of a single, Mediterranean physical type, then one might reasonably conclude they were pretty much the same people. The recent Neolithic y-dna finds, including those from the La Pierre Fritte dolmen, have all been either I2a, G2a, or E1b1b (with the exception of one F*, as I recall). Those haplogroups are much more common in the Mediterranean region than they are in NW Europe. So far, we have the remains of a Neolithic people of a single Mediterranean physical type whose males are testing positive for Mediterranean y haplogroups.

It seems to me a reasonable working hypothesis might be that the Neolithic settlers of western Europe were generally of this Mediterranean type, that the Mediterranean littoral was their ultimate source, and that the males were generally of the same combination of y haplogroups, which did not include R1b.

So, where was R1b (by which I mean probably R-L11)?

Was it yet to arrive in western Europe or just beginning to arrive? Or was it in retreat as a part of the remnant of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers, hiding out, waiting for its ultimate resurgence and demographic triumph?

I think the two Beaker men from Kromsdorf give us a clue to the answer.
I agree with you, Rich, on mediterranean origine of megalithic people. The recent paper of ancient autosomal DNA in Sweden from Skoglund et al. shows us that megalithic people of the Funnel Beaker culture were of mediterranean origine.

Thanks for mentioning that, Bernard. I had forgotten it.
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Jean M
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« Reply #36 on: June 09, 2012, 07:08:51 AM »

I really had in mind the megalithic tombs that occur from the western Mediterranean into the British Isles.

One of the things I recall from reading Coons is that he said the bodies in them were mostly of a small, gracile, long-headed, Mediterranean type. In the British Isles, this physical type preceded the physical type represented by the Beaker Folk.

Yes that is all true. But all the incoming farmers were of the same small, gracile, long-headed, Mediterranean type, whether they lugged big stones around or not. This does not mean that they were all of the same Y-DNA haplogroup. So far we have from Neolithic sites E1b1b1a1b (V13), G2a, G2a3 (L30/S126), and I2a1, all of which are very likely to have arrived with farmers, and F*, which could have arrived with them, but equally may reflect an older genetic strata in Europe, assimilated by farmers. I still expect J2 to be found in other Neolithic sites.
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« Reply #37 on: June 09, 2012, 08:08:36 AM »

I really had in mind the megalithic tombs that occur from the western Mediterranean into the British Isles.

One of the things I recall from reading Coons is that he said the bodies in them were mostly of a small, gracile, long-headed, Mediterranean type. In the British Isles, this physical type preceded the physical type represented by the Beaker Folk.

Yes that is all true. But all the incoming farmers were of the same small, gracile, long-headed, Mediterranean type, whether they lugged big stones around or not. This does not mean that they were all of the same Y-DNA haplogroup. So far we have from Neolithic sites E1b1b1a1b (V13), G2a, G2a3 (L30/S126), and I2a1, all of which are very likely to have arrived with farmers, and F*, which could have arrived with them, but equally may reflect an older genetic strata in Europe, assimilated by farmers. I still expect J2 to be found in other Neolithic sites.

No, I wouldn't think they would all be of the same y haplogroup either. I have read your Ancient Eurasian DNA site and am aware of the y haplogroups to date that have been found at various Neolithic sites in Europe. I do think perhaps the same basic combination of Mediterranean y haplogroups would not be out of the question: Mediterranean types, Mediterranean y haplogroups.
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« Reply #38 on: June 09, 2012, 08:15:45 AM »

I have started a Google map of ancient European y-dna, using Jean M's excellent Ancient Eurasian DNA as a handy reference.

Ancient European Y-DNA (to about 2000 BC)

The little green tents represent Neolithic stuff. The light blue placemark is Beaker, the yellow placemark is Corded Ware, and the red placemark is Ötzi. Click on the various placemarks for y haplogroup details and sources.

I am trying not to make too much work for myself, since my time is limited, so I probably won't include Asian stuff, unless something really exciting and motivating comes along with regard to R1b. I cut off the temporal proximity of the finds at 2000 BC for the same reason, but that is subject to change, especially if some neat Beaker stuff turns up.

Let me know if I goofed up any of the locations. I started this map for my own benefit. I find visual stuff helpful. Notice, for example, how close to each other the Kromsdorf R1b Beaker guys were to the Eulau R1a Corded Ware guys and at about the same time (I realize the time part is weak; they probably were not exactly contemporary).
« Last Edit: June 09, 2012, 08:27:18 AM by rms2 » Logged

Jean M
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« Reply #39 on: June 09, 2012, 08:31:02 AM »

Very helpful. The marker for Avellanar slips over the border to France at small scale.
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« Reply #40 on: June 09, 2012, 08:37:24 AM »

Very helpful. The marker for Avellanar slips over the border to France at small scale.

That cannot be helped, unless I choose a smaller type of marker. I like the green tents for Neolithic stuff, but I'll look into something better, if I can find it.
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Richard Rocca
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« Reply #41 on: June 09, 2012, 09:21:03 AM »

Cool map Rich. I'm not sure if meets your timeline criteria, but you could also include the Urnfied I2a2b, R1a1 and R1b from the Lichtenstein Cave near Dorste, Lower Saxony, Germany.
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« Reply #42 on: June 09, 2012, 04:19:18 PM »

BTW, I meant Coon (as in Carleton Coon), not Coons.

I used to work with a guy named Ken Coons, so Coon became Coons inadvertently.

I once saw a rural Irish guy nearly getting into a fight with a black guy in England because he was using rthe word 'black' as a term of abuse for someone else nearby (who was white)  but the term is actually an Irish sectarian one not a racial one and means 'protestant' 'unionist' etc.   

I also once had the bizzare situation of shouting Paki at a Pakistani guy across a shop and everyone looking round at me like I was a racist.  I only realised afterwards how bad it must have looked.  In fact the guy was known as Paki by his own family members and all his friends because his first name was Pakash.
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« Reply #43 on: June 09, 2012, 04:38:03 PM »

Isn't this the first instance of y-dna from a megalithic tomb?

Yes that is true. The results from Péré tumulus C, Prissé-la-Charrière (4000 BC) were only mtDNA. I have updated my megaliths page.

Have to say though that megalithic tombs are found over most of Eurasia right into the Far East and stone circles are found in part of Africa as well as Europe and the Near East.  Building them was not a culture in itself. They were favoured by Neolithic farming societies. Given the limited spread of I2a1, I think we can guess that only a tiny proportion of such monuments were built by men carrying I2a1.

I really had in mind the megalithic tombs that occur from the western Mediterranean into the British Isles.

One of the things I recall from reading Coons is that he said the bodies in them were mostly of a small, gracile, long-headed, Mediterranean type. In the British Isles, this physical type preceded the physical type represented by the Beaker Folk.

If Coons was right, and the remains connected with the megalithic tombs in western Europe were predominantly of a single, Mediterranean physical type, then one might reasonably conclude they were pretty much the same people. The recent Neolithic y-dna finds, including those from the La Pierre Fritte dolmen, have all been either I2a, G2a, or E1b1b (with the exception of one F*, as I recall). Those haplogroups are much more common in the Mediterranean region than they are in NW Europe. So far, we have the remains of a Neolithic people of a single Mediterranean physical type whose males are testing positive for Mediterranean y haplogroups.

It seems to me a reasonable working hypothesis might be that the Neolithic settlers of western Europe were generally of this Mediterranean type, that the Mediterranean littoral was their ultimate source, and that the males were generally of the same combination of y haplogroups, which did not include R1b.

So, where was R1b (by which I mean probably R-L11)?

Was it yet to arrive in western Europe or just beginning to arrive? Or was it in retreat as a part of the remnant of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers, hiding out, waiting for its ultimate resurgence and demographic triumph?

I think the two Beaker men from Kromsdorf give us a clue to the answer.


Coon did differentiate between the Megalithic and the Danubian Neolithic types.  The former, although 'Mediterranean' in a general sense, were taller and even more longer skulled.  This is somewhat like the Corded type except the vault was not as high in the Megalithics.  I don't know how much bearing this has in terms of hg's. Possibly indigenous I2's acquiring gracile admixture from incoming neolithics is my first impression for this larger megalithic mediterranean type.

It stills looks like R1b is a late arrival meaning late neolithic and later.  The studies thus far do not look good for the Mesolithic R1b continuity argument in western Europe.

One interesting possible continuity in Ireland was the way cremation never went away.  As far as I understand 2 Irish Mesolithic cremations found in County Limerick are the oldest cremations in Europe.  Cremation is unknown in neighbouring countries in the Mesolithic.  When the Neolithic burial traditions of megalithic collective inhumation arrived the Irish dabbled in it but cremation still remained predominant.  In the Early Bronze Age inhumation appeared but it was still overshadowed by cremation and fairly soon cremation came to dominate (almost exclusive) from maybe 1800BC too 100AD.   So, Ireland is very much going to be at a disadvantage in ancient DNA.  There is practically no unburned bone from c. 1800BC-100AD in Irish burials.  Indeed, the only periods where inhumation had any significant role was the early-mid Neolithic (when it was still minority) and a few centuries around 2000BC.  The rest of the 8000 years of Irish prehistory is dominated almost exclusively by cremation. Cremation clearly was  very very important to the Irish from the earliest settlers and always re-emerged even when this made Ireland out of step with its neighbours.
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« Reply #44 on: June 09, 2012, 06:43:06 PM »

Cool map Rich. I'm not sure if meets your timeline criteria, but you could also include the Urnfied I2a2b, R1a1 and R1b from the Lichtenstein Cave near Dorste, Lower Saxony, Germany.

I may add it later. I thought about adding it, but it seems a trifle late to me.
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« Reply #45 on: June 10, 2012, 07:25:23 AM »

Cool map Rich. I'm not sure if meets your timeline criteria, but you could also include the Urnfied I2a2b, R1a1 and R1b from the Lichtenstein Cave near Dorste, Lower Saxony, Germany.

I may add it later. I thought about adding it, but it seems a trifle late to me.

Okay, I went ahead and added the Lichtenstein Cave and changed the name of the map to indicate a terminal date of 1000 BC.

I think 1000 BC is about as late as I want to go, unless they get some really really interesting stuff not too far off that date, like the Hochdorf Prince or something similar.
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« Reply #46 on: June 13, 2012, 07:14:22 AM »

Another ancient mtDNA study of Bronze and Iron Age remains in Romania. Haplogroup H is the dominant signature as in many other mtDNA sites in Europe. Interesting that ancient populations of Bulgarians bear a closer relationship to Turks of Tracian origin. Trace appears to have been one of the migration points of the Celts.

Analysis of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes of old human populations from the Bronze and Iron Age from Romania

Keywords: mitochondrial DNA; haplotypes; Bronze and Age populations

Authors: A. Rodewald1, G. Cardos2, C. Tesio3;

Abstract: Our genetic study was focused on old human populations from the Bronze and Iron Ages from Romania in order to analysed their genetic variation and their genetic kinship al mitochondrial DNA(mtDNA)level with today´s Romanian populations and other modern European populations. The ancient DNA(aDNA)was extracted from skeletal remains of 50 individuals from the Bronze and Iron Age by a phenol-chloroform DNA extraction method.MtDNA HVR I and HVR II regions were amplified by PCR and sequenced by the dideoxy chain terminator method.The aDNA data were analysed in comparison with corresponding mtDNA data of modern Romanian people and other 11 European populations.The ancient mtDNA haplotypes were framed into 12 haplogroups. The most frequent mtDNA haplotype identified in the old individual sample from Romania was the CRS-like, and the most frequent haplogroup was H.Significant differences in haplogroup frequencies between the old people and modern Romanians were found. Low values of internal standard genetic diversity indices suggested reduced genetic variability within old human populations from the Bronze and Iron Age from Romania, in contrast to all modern European populations and also modern Romanians, which showed higher mitochondrial haplogroup diversity values. This fact might be the result of social and cultural local organization in small tribes, partially reproductively isolated. Concerning the genetic relationships at mitochondrial level, old human populations from Romania have shown closer genetic relationship to Turks of Thracian origin,while modern Romanians were closer to modern Bulgarian, Italian, Greek and Spanish populations.

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« Reply #47 on: June 13, 2012, 07:19:22 AM »

A Y -chromosome portrait of modern Bulgarians as viewed from different spatiotemporal aspects

Authors: S. Karachanak1,2, V. Grugni2, D. Nesheva1, N. Al-Zahery2, V. Battaglia2, C. Nici2, V. Carossa2, Y. Yordanov3, A. Torroni2, A. S. Galabov4, O. Semino2,5, D. Toncheva1,5;

Abstract: To address the structure and evolution of the Bulgarian paternal gene pool, we have examined the Y chromosome variation in 809 Bulgarian males. The analysis was performed by high-resolution genotyping of biallelic markers and by analyzing the STR variation within certain haplogroups. The biallelic markers were analyzed by PCR/RFLP and PCR/DHPLC assay. Seventeen fast-evolving Y-STRs were amplified using the multiplex AmpFlSTR Yfiler PCR Amplification Kit (Applied Biosystems) and were read on ABI 310 genetic analyzer with GeneMapper software.We found that the Bulgarian Y chromosome gene pool is primarily contained within haplogroups common in Europe and surrounding areas. Furthermore, when patrilineal relationships are visualized in a broader context by principal component analysis, Bulgarians are located among European populations. The analysis of molecular variance shows that the genetic variation within the country is structured among Western, Central and Eastern Bulgaria, rather than among the Black Sea coast, the Danubian Plane, Thrace and the Southwest mountainous region; which indicates that the Balkan Mountains have been permeable to human movements.
Y-STR variation ages and median joining networks of haplogroups E-V13, J-M241, R-M458, R-L23 and I-M423 were calculated together with data from other populations. For this purpose, the analyses of STR variation within haplogroups were based on 8 STR loci, with the exception of haplogroup R-M458, for which the STR profiles were further reduced to 7 loci. In general, the Y-STR data reveal that different prehistoric and historic events have left detectable traces in the Bulgarian Y chromosome gene pool.

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Heber


 
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Heber
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« Reply #48 on: June 13, 2012, 07:23:39 AM »

Dienekes has an interesting analysis of recent ancient Y and mtDNA finds and speculates on the spread of the Indo European language.

Assessing Neolithic Europeans with 'weac2'

I have used the West Eurasian cline calculator 'weac2' to assess the Tyrolean Iceman and Neolithic Swedes. The admixture proportions can be seen below, and appear largely consistent with all previous analyses of the same individuals:

It is interesting that Gok4, the Swedish Megalithic TRB female belongs to the Atlantic_Baltic and Near_East components, while the two major Y-chromosome haplogroups associated with West European Neolithic sites so far are I2a1 and G2a (Treilles and Dolmen of La Pierre Fritte) whose distribution very well parallels these two components: Atlantic_Baltic/I2a1 in Europe, and Near_East/G2a in the Near East.

The simplest explanation, based on the available evidence, is that the Neolithic populations of Europe were descended from G2a-bearing pioneers entering Europe from the southeast, and encountering an I2a1-bearing population of pre-farmers in Europe itself. The high frequency of I2a1 in Sardinia, as well as the presence of G2a in that population serves to underscore the substantial genetic continuity between ancient Neolithic Europeans and modern Sardinians.

The absence of the South_Asian component in 'weac2' in all of these individuals is also important. This component captures ancestry (both Caucasoid and Ancestral South Indian) from further east and south, where both G2a/I2a1 are quite rare. As I have noted before, both Europe and South Asia have been affected in late/post-Neolithic times by migrations from West Asia.

It is tempting to associate this population movement with the spread of Indo-European languages, and we can only eagerly await more autosomal ancient DNA samples that will reveal the arrival of the "missing components" over the Neolithic substratum.

http://dienekes.blogspot.co.uk/
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Heber


 
R1b1a2a1a1b4  L459+ L21+ DF21+ DF13+ U198- U106- P66- P314.2- M37- M222- L96- L513- L48- L44- L4- L226- L2- L196- L195- L193- L192.1- L176.2- L165- L159.2- L148- L144- L130- L1-
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acekon
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« Reply #49 on: June 13, 2012, 11:25:20 AM »

"Atlantic_Baltic/I2a1 in Europe"
If you take in consideration no IJ*.
It becomes connected by the following Atlantic_Baltic/R-M429[s2s22]base marker.

How about linking R_M429/"Southern" component on Dienekes k7b?

Hopefully the ancient samples will shed some light on the age of I and if IJ exists.
  
« Last Edit: June 13, 2012, 11:26:35 AM by acekon » Logged

YDNA: R-Z2105* Śląsk-Polska
MtDNA: U5b2a2*Königsberg-Ostpreussen
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