World Families Forums - Mitochondrial DNA Signals of Late Glacial Recolonization of Europe from Near Eas

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
July 10, 2014, 08:55:39 PM
Home Help Search Login Register

+  World Families Forums
|-+  General Forums - Note: You must Be Logged In to post. Anyone can browse.
| |-+  Mitochondrial DNA
| | |-+  Mitochondrial DNA Signals of Late Glacial Recolonization of Europe from Near Eas
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Mitochondrial DNA Signals of Late Glacial Recolonization of Europe from Near Eas  (Read 850 times)
Maliclavelli
Guru
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2146


« on: May 08, 2012, 01:00:35 PM »

The American Journal of Human Genetics, Volume 90, Issue 5, 915-924, 4 May 2012 doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2012.04.003

Mitochondrial DNA Signals of Late Glacial Recolonization of Europe from Near Eastern Refugia

Maria Pala et al.

Human populations, along with those of many other species, are thought to have contracted into a number of refuge areas at the height of the last Ice Age. European populations are believed to be, to a large extent, the descendants of the inhabitants of these refugia, and some extant mtDNA lineages can be traced to refugia in Franco-Cantabria (haplogroups H1, H3, V, and U5b1), the Italian Peninsula (U5b3), and the East European Plain (U4 and U5a). Parts of the Near East, such as the Levant, were also continuously inhabited throughout the Last Glacial Maximum, but unlike western and eastern Europe, no archaeological or genetic evidence for Late Glacial expansions into Europe from the Near East has hitherto been discovered. Here we report, on the basis of an enlarged whole-genome mitochondrial database, that a substantial, perhaps predominant, signal from mitochondrial haplogroups J and T, previously thought to have spread primarily from the Near East into Europe with the Neolithic population, may in fact reflect dispersals during the Late Glacial period, ∼19–12 thousand years (ka) ago.


Logged

Maliclavelli


YDNA: R-S12460


MtDNA: K1a1b1e

Maliclavelli
Guru
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2146


« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2012, 01:07:16 PM »

Certainly this paper merits to be discussed, even though it isn’t for free, but the supplements are, and from them we may understand everything. It is noteworthy that the paper says that there were three European refugia (Franco-Cantabrian, Italian and Eastern European) and that H1 and H3 came from the Franco-Cantabrian refugium, in contrast with the date of the last paper of Behar et al., which gives only 12,000 years for this haplogroup, and J/T, if came from Middle East, came between 19,000 and 12,000 years ago, that is what I have always said, found very ancient also these haplogroups in Europe.
Logged

Maliclavelli


YDNA: R-S12460


MtDNA: K1a1b1e

Maliclavelli
Guru
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2146


« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2012, 03:42:13 PM »

(A Press release) ScienceDaily (May 8, 2012) — Scientists have used DNA analysis to gain important new insights into how human beings repopulated Europe as the Ice Age relaxed its grip.
Dr Maria Pala, who is based at the University of Huddersfield -- now a key centre for archaeo-genetics research -- is the lead author of an article in the latest issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics which shows how the Near East was a major source of replenishment when huge areas of European territory became habitable again, up to 19,000 years ago.
Until the new findings, it was thought that there were two principal safe havens for humans as the Ice Age, or Last Glacial Maximum, descended, approximately 26,000 years ago. They were a "Franco-Cantabrian" area roughly coinciding with northern Spain/southern France, and a "Periglacial province" on the Ukrainian plains.
Now Dr Pala and her colleagues have greatly added to this picture by analyzing large quantities of mitochondrial DNA from Europeans who belong to two major lineages -- who share a common genetic ancestor -- named J and T. It is known that these haplo-groups originated in the Middle East and until the latest research it was thought that they migrated to Europe in the Neolithic age, approximately 9,000 years ago.
The research project outlined in the American Journal of Human Genetics presents evidence that humans belonging to the J and T haplo-groups actually migrated to Europe much earlier than previously believed, as the Ice Age drew to a close.
"The end of the Last Glacial Maximum allowed people to recolonize the parts of Europe that had been deserted and this expansion allowed increase of human populations," says Sardinian-born Dr Pala, who begun research into the topic while at the University of Pavia in Italy.
She later relocated to the UK and is now a Senior Research Fellow at the University of Huddersfield, where archaeo-genetics research -- in newly equipped laboratories -- is headed by
Professor Martin Richards, a leader in a field of science which combines archaeology with genetics to learn about the early history of humans and how they colonized the planet.
In addition to purely scientific challenges and discoveries, Dr Pala believes that archaeo-genetics has important lessons to teach humanity.
"It helps us to reevaluate the perception of our identity. We are highly focused on identifying ourselves as Italians, British or whatever, but by analyzing DNA we discover that originally, not such a long time ago, we came from a common source."
Logged

Maliclavelli


YDNA: R-S12460


MtDNA: K1a1b1e

secherbernard
Old Hand
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 155


« Reply #3 on: May 12, 2012, 02:03:59 AM »

The Maria Pala paper is available from my blog:
http://secherbernard.blog.free.fr/index.php?post/2012/05/11/Les-haplogroupes-mitochondriaux-J-et-T-sont-ils-arriv%C3%A9s-en-Europe-avant-le-n%C3%A9olithique
« Last Edit: May 12, 2012, 02:05:44 AM by secherbernard » Logged

YDNA: R-DF13+ L69+ DYS464X: cccc.3
mtDNA: U6a7a1
mtDNA of my father: U5a2c
YDNA of my maternal uncle: I1*
Ysearch and Mitosearch: UE9BU
Ysearch of my maternal uncle: CEC59

Maliclavelli
Guru
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2146


« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2012, 12:47:53 PM »

Many thanks, Bernard. I am very glad of this, also because I have written about this from so long and all my theories are based upon this, also that of the ancientness of hg. R1b1* and subclades in Europe.
Logged

Maliclavelli


YDNA: R-S12460


MtDNA: K1a1b1e

secherbernard
Old Hand
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 155


« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2012, 12:59:44 PM »

Many thanks, Bernard. I am very glad of this, also because I have written about this from so long and all my theories are based upon this, also that of the ancientness of hg. R1b1* and subclades in Europe.
Maria Pala spoke about very old studies now obsoletes in the years 1998-2005. Look at the references. R1b arrived probably in Western Europe in the 3d millenium BC with the Bell Beaker culture as the ancient DNA tests show us.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2012, 01:07:24 PM by secherbernard » Logged

YDNA: R-DF13+ L69+ DYS464X: cccc.3
mtDNA: U6a7a1
mtDNA of my father: U5a2c
YDNA of my maternal uncle: I1*
Ysearch and Mitosearch: UE9BU
Ysearch of my maternal uncle: CEC59

Maliclavelli
Guru
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2146


« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2012, 01:28:16 PM »

Maria Pala spoke about very old studies now obsoletes in the years 1998-2005. Look at the references. R1b arrived probably in Western Europe in the 3d millenium BC with the Bell Beaker culture as the ancient DNA tests show us.
Yes, I know your theories, of you and of the others who think like you, but let's wait. So far we have now certainly and R1b1a2* in Europe 4600 years old, that is much more than what your think till yesterday (of course it depends from which subclade that we don't know so far) and above all nothing similar has been found so far in Middle East or elsewhere. Let's wait and after we'll see who is right and who is wrong.
Logged

Maliclavelli


YDNA: R-S12460


MtDNA: K1a1b1e

Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


SEO light theme by © Mustang forums. Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC

Page created in 0.137 seconds with 18 queries.