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Brousse
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« Reply #525 on: June 08, 2013, 08:43:19 AM »

Seems like most of us SRY2627 persons come from the Rare Middle class of Europe As a Yeoman is a pre middle class person able to own land and bare arms I come from a landed educated Merchant family of France
« Last Edit: June 10, 2013, 11:24:36 AM by Brousse » Logged

R1b1a2a1a1b5a Sry2627+ My family was exiled from Cognac France in 1685 Lived in London for 15 years then on to America to the Manikin town settlement for French Protestants in 1700
samIsaack
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« Reply #526 on: June 10, 2013, 05:06:16 PM »

Seems like most of us SRY2627 persons come from the Rare Middle class of Europe As a Yeoman is a pre middle class person able to own land and bare arms I come from a landed educated Merchant family of France

They were more common than you think..

"In the late 14th to 18th centuries, yeomen were farmers who owned land (freehold, leasehold or copyhold). Their wealth and the size of their landholding varied.

Many yeomen were prosperous, and wealthy enough to employ servants and farm labourers. Some were as wealthy as the minor county or regional landed gentry and some even leased land to gentleman landowners. Some could be classed as gentlemen but did not aspire to this status: it was cheaper to remain a yeoman. Often it was hard to distinguish minor landed gentry from the wealthier yeomen, and wealthier husbandmen from the poorer yeomen. Some yeomen in the later Tudor and Stuart periods were descended from medieval military yeomen. This is attested mainly by weapons found above fireplace mantles in the West Midlands of England (especially in the border shires)."
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« Reply #527 on: June 16, 2013, 05:32:24 AM »

Seems like most of us SRY2627 persons come from the Rare Middle class of Europe As a Yeoman is a pre middle class person able to own land and bare arms I come from a landed educated Merchant family of France

They were more common than you think..

"In the late 14th to 18th centuries, yeomen were farmers who owned land (freehold, leasehold or copyhold). Their wealth and the size of their landholding varied.

Many yeomen were prosperous, and wealthy enough to employ servants and farm labourers. Some were as wealthy as the minor county or regional landed gentry and some even leased land to gentleman landowners. Some could be classed as gentlemen but did not aspire to this status: it was cheaper to remain a yeoman. Often it was hard to distinguish minor landed gentry from the wealthier yeomen, and wealthier husbandmen from the poorer yeomen. Some yeomen in the later Tudor and Stuart periods were descended from medieval military yeomen. This is attested mainly by weapons found above fireplace mantles in the West Midlands of England (especially in the border shires)."


There are so many convoluted descriptions of what a yeoman is. The later 19th Century descriptions seem to associate 'yeoman' with rank or status of a farmer. Thus it seems like always point to a wealthy or prosperous farmer which makes absolutely no sense as to the original meaning of it. During the earlier periods predating the Elizabethan period it seems 'yeomen' were attendants in a noble or royal household. Looking at the Field of Cloth of Gold we see yeomen bodyguards for King Henry VII and yeomen bodyguards for Cardinal Wolsey . So the term now around this period and earlier is connected to both household attendants as well bodyguards as a dual function. This can be in the Black Book of the Household with 'yeomen of the crown' and 'yeomen of the chamber' both are to be expert archers and basically are the predecessors of the permanent 'yeomen of the guard' and later 'yeomen warders of the tower of London.' I found a 'Yeoman Usher of the Black Rod who also performs a sort of attending and security of the House of Lords. Of course we must not forget Chaucer and his Knight's Yeoman who is armed to the teeth apparently on a pilgrimage to Canterbury after returning from a crusade in attendance to his knight. I would guess the Knight is also Forester or Chief Forester and the Yeoman is his deputy or underforester. The Canon's Yeoman just as the Cardinal Wolsey's yeomen appears to have a 'yeoman' servant performing duties for the Ecclesiastical powers too. I have no idea how far back it goes except that I see it in the Patent Rolls of Edward II's time as 'King's Yeoman'. I would be remiss if I didn't mention the ballads of Robin Hood which probably is based on some event around the Angevin period. It seems like the term 'valet' or 'varlet' was borrowed from the French or Latin to describe them but I see no etymological connection. I would guess that they were modeled of the French royal bodyguard from when Henry VII was exiled in Brittany or even more likely a concept of an earlier period.

A constant thread connected to 'yeomen' is archery, forestry, royal and noble bodyguard and/or household attendant among serving the sovereign's interest abroad and throughout the kingdom. I'm aware that 'yeomen of the crown' would make arrests and 'yeomen of the guard' even served as constables of Tournai. Pollard claims 'yeoman' is a contraction of 'yongerman' or something like that. It makes sense maybe in the aspect when combined with 'manservant' and is first known or is first mentioned in the forest laws of King Cnut (though it's disputed he actually wrote them). If this is true I wonder if it's connected to some way to Huscarl which is a royal bodyguard of ceorls or churls. Who knows? A ceorl or peasant is less of a threat to royalty than his own jealous nobles, cousins, uncles, and brothers (the Romans did the same thing with Praetorian Guard with Germanic people who were more loyal to the Emperor than his own peers or Roman companions). What I can't seem to find is the term 'yeoman' in the Anglo-Saxon reign. So what's left? Viking incursion period or perhaps the reign of the Dane Kings of the Danelaw period. No idea. It just seems the first royal bodyguard of England was really from the Danes as the Huscarls. I tend to favor the Dane King and also Norwegian King or Viking connections because of the cool sounding names like Forkbeard, Ivan the Boneless, Bluetooth, etc. Edward the Confessor, Harold, Edmund, Alfred the Great, are great men but they sound boring. The only really later cool sounding kings were William the Conqueror and Richard the Lionheart. George, William , Edward, James--yawn!

One long association with 'yeoman' is with the famous yew war bow aka longbow of the Hundred Years War. 'Yeoman' is definitely is not derived from 'yewman' though perhaps it could sound similar. I think the term has to predate the Hundred Years War. What is interesting is how the word 'yeoman' has maintained somewhat of a presence as miscellaneous occupations or rating within most armed forces of English speaking countries today. Of course, the 'Yeomen Usher of the Black Rod is a Lt Col', 'Yeomen Warders and Yeomen of the Bodyguard are retired service members with at least 22 years of service who have earned a meritorious service medal.  The earlier bodyguards carried bows instead of the halberds and/or various other pole weapons. It's funny and interesting how people today think 'yeomen' as farmers from the 18th and 19th Centuries or as some clerk in the U.S. Navy or position on the Star Trek Enterprise. LOL!

Arch

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samIsaack
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« Reply #528 on: June 16, 2013, 11:58:02 PM »

@Arch

I was hoping you would reply! Seeing as how your last name is "Yeoman", I figured you'd be more informed than I am on the subject.

There does some to be a correlation with SRY2627 people and the military though. I'm sure its just a coincidence though.
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« Reply #529 on: June 17, 2013, 06:17:01 PM »

The Family of De La Roche has contacted me they are my only 12 marker match non surname match so I'm hoping we can exchange info

Have they tested beyond the basic twelve markers?
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« Reply #530 on: June 17, 2013, 06:53:51 PM »

@Arch

I was hoping you would reply! Seeing as how your last name is "Yeoman", I figured you'd be more informed than I am on the subject.

There does some to be a correlation with SRY2627 people and the military though. I'm sure its just a coincidence though.

I wonder how it might relate to the Angles or later Danes. Yesterday, I watched nearly all 5 hours of BBC's Blood of the Vikings and was pondering some ideas. I think if we see the 'term' arise around 14th Century that is still has a much older connection to its origins. I don't think it just magically appeared during the early 1300s even though it's the first time we actually see it used in royal documents. With looking at the term gentry and gentleman I don't see any correlation until around the Tudor period except they are of different social status, rank, and or privileges. Going with Holt's concept followed support by A.J. Pollard that 'yeomen' basically is a contraction of 'yongerman' and connected with the keeping of royal forests under a knight or chief forester. How 'yongerman' were used in the royal household I am still trying to find a connection and so far the best one would be related to the Huscarls as being serving peasants to the king.  In Beowulf there appears to be 'geongra and geongre mannus' which are obvious retainers. So it look's like it has more of an origin in the Danelaw region or at best earliest in the Angle region of early Britain (which is really mostly the Danelaw region much later on). The concept of Robin Hood and his 'yongmen' or 'yeoman' wearing the color of Lincoln Green (obviously from ancient Lindsey, which was originally Angle territory).
Even the stories of Robin Hood is mostly focused in Yorkshire, Barnsdale, Derbyshire, and Nottingham with some excursions to London towards "shooter's hill." This is all speculative of course, but I'm looking for the earliest use of archers in England.

Aside from the Silures and ancient Britons the Saxons themselves do not appear to be much fans of archery or have archers. The only time an archer or archery is even mentioned is after the arrival of the Vikings. However, I found it interesting that the Norwegian king attempting to invade England was struck by an archer but this was after the Danes had settled. In fact, at the Battle of Hastings we see the Huscarls fighting along the Saxon king but was a borrowed relic from the rule of the Dane kings. So far it looks like the Germanics that brought archery to Britain are for the most part the Danes--though I wonder the possibility of Angles doing the same.

With DNA I pondered the possibility of a more ancient Cimbri connection as they along with the Angles originate from the same area and Cimbri are usually called Celtic. The Cimbri ended up in Tolouse and the Pyrenees, as well norther Italy so they sort of spread out nicely where SRY2627 is found today. They also are not too far off from our brother Norwegian Viking clade of L165. So maybe SRY2627 has a nordic origins and then migrated southwards towards Iberia and Italy.

Arch
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Webb
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« Reply #531 on: June 17, 2013, 07:50:21 PM »

@Arch

I was hoping you would reply! Seeing as how your last name is "Yeoman", I figured you'd be more informed than I am on the subject.

There does some to be a correlation with SRY2627 people and the military though. I'm sure its just a coincidence though.

I wonder how it might relate to the Angles or later Danes. Yesterday, I watched nearly all 5 hours of BBC's Blood of the Vikings and was pondering some ideas. I think if we see the 'term' arise around 14th Century that is still has a much older connection to its origins. I don't think it just magically appeared during the early 1300s even though it's the first time we actually see it used in royal documents. With looking at the term gentry and gentleman I don't see any correlation until around the Tudor period except they are of different social status, rank, and or privileges. Going with Holt's concept followed support by A.J. Pollard that 'yeomen' basically is a contraction of 'yongerman' and connected with the keeping of royal forests under a knight or chief forester. How 'yongerman' were used in the royal household I am still trying to find a connection and so far the best one would be related to the Huscarls as being serving peasants to the king.  In Beowulf there appears to be 'geongra and geongre mannus' which are obvious retainers. So it look's like it has more of an origin in the Danelaw region or at best earliest in the Angle region of early Britain (which is really mostly the Danelaw region much later on). The concept of Robin Hood and his 'yongmen' or 'yeoman' wearing the color of Lincoln Green (obviously from ancient Lindsey, which was originally Angle territory).
Even the stories of Robin Hood is mostly focused in Yorkshire, Barnsdale, Derbyshire, and Nottingham with some excursions to London towards "shooter's hill." This is all speculative of course, but I'm looking for the earliest use of archers in England.

Aside from the Silures and ancient Britons the Saxons themselves do not appear to be much fans of archery or have archers. The only time an archer or archery is even mentioned is after the arrival of the Vikings. However, I found it interesting that the Norwegian king attempting to invade England was struck by an archer but this was after the Danes had settled. In fact, at the Battle of Hastings we see the Huscarls fighting along the Saxon king but was a borrowed relic from the rule of the Dane kings. So far it looks like the Germanics that brought archery to Britain are for the most part the Danes--though I wonder the possibility of Angles doing the same.

With DNA I pondered the possibility of a more ancient Cimbri connection as they along with the Angles originate from the same area and Cimbri are usually called Celtic. The Cimbri ended up in Tolouse and the Pyrenees, as well norther Italy so they sort of spread out nicely where SRY2627 is found today. They also are not too far off from our brother Norwegian Viking clade of L165. So maybe SRY2627 has a nordic origins and then migrated southwards towards Iberia and Italy.

Arch

I brought up that theory for the north/south cluster in a different forum, the North Sea origin, then moving west into England and south into France and Spain.  I was quickly pounced upon.  So far the Geno 2.0 results has confirmed a dividing point between the Dutch/British nort/south folks and the French/Spanish north/south folks.  The Dutch/British are negative for the more recent clades, stopping at Z210, which is one more downstream of Z220.  The French/Spanish results are coming back positive for three to four more snps below Z210.  So either a group of Z210 split off heading north from Spain/France and went into Britain and the Netherlands, leaving the remaining Z210 in Spain/France, where they continued to accrue downstream snps that the northern group did not accrue, or Z210 originated in the North Sea area and then accrued these further downstream snps enroute to or after they settled in Spain/France.
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William B. Webb
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« Reply #532 on: June 17, 2013, 10:19:33 PM »

@Arch

I was hoping you would reply! Seeing as how your last name is "Yeoman", I figured you'd be more informed than I am on the subject.

There does some to be a correlation with SRY2627 people and the military though. I'm sure its just a coincidence though.

I wonder how it might relate to the Angles or later Danes. Yesterday, I watched nearly all 5 hours of BBC's Blood of the Vikings and was pondering some ideas. I think if we see the 'term' arise around 14th Century that is still has a much older connection to its origins. I don't think it just magically appeared during the early 1300s even though it's the first time we actually see it used in royal documents. With looking at the term gentry and gentleman I don't see any correlation until around the Tudor period except they are of different social status, rank, and or privileges. Going with Holt's concept followed support by A.J. Pollard that 'yeomen' basically is a contraction of 'yongerman' and connected with the keeping of royal forests under a knight or chief forester. How 'yongerman' were used in the royal household I am still trying to find a connection and so far the best one would be related to the Huscarls as being serving peasants to the king.  In Beowulf there appears to be 'geongra and geongre mannus' which are obvious retainers. So it look's like it has more of an origin in the Danelaw region or at best earliest in the Angle region of early Britain (which is really mostly the Danelaw region much later on). The concept of Robin Hood and his 'yongmen' or 'yeoman' wearing the color of Lincoln Green (obviously from ancient Lindsey, which was originally Angle territory).
Even the stories of Robin Hood is mostly focused in Yorkshire, Barnsdale, Derbyshire, and Nottingham with some excursions to London towards "shooter's hill." This is all speculative of course, but I'm looking for the earliest use of archers in England.

Aside from the Silures and ancient Britons the Saxons themselves do not appear to be much fans of archery or have archers. The only time an archer or archery is even mentioned is after the arrival of the Vikings. However, I found it interesting that the Norwegian king attempting to invade England was struck by an archer but this was after the Danes had settled. In fact, at the Battle of Hastings we see the Huscarls fighting along the Saxon king but was a borrowed relic from the rule of the Dane kings. So far it looks like the Germanics that brought archery to Britain are for the most part the Danes--though I wonder the possibility of Angles doing the same.

With DNA I pondered the possibility of a more ancient Cimbri connection as they along with the Angles originate from the same area and Cimbri are usually called Celtic. The Cimbri ended up in Tolouse and the Pyrenees, as well norther Italy so they sort of spread out nicely where SRY2627 is found today. They also are not too far off from our brother Norwegian Viking clade of L165. So maybe SRY2627 has a nordic origins and then migrated southwards towards Iberia and Italy.

Arch

I brought up that theory for the north/south cluster in a different forum, the North Sea origin, then moving west into England and south into France and Spain.  I was quickly pounced upon.  So far the Geno 2.0 results has confirmed a dividing point between the Dutch/British nort/south folks and the French/Spanish north/south folks.  The Dutch/British are negative for the more recent clades, stopping at Z210, which is one more downstream of Z220.  The French/Spanish results are coming back positive for three to four more snps below Z210.  So either a group of Z210 split off heading north from Spain/France and went into Britain and the Netherlands, leaving the remaining Z210 in Spain/France, where they continued to accrue downstream snps that the northern group did not accrue, or Z210 originated in the North Sea area and then accrued these further downstream snps enroute to or after they settled in Spain/France.

Interesting. Maybe this might be something here.

Arch
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samIsaack
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« Reply #533 on: June 17, 2013, 10:28:32 PM »

"With DNA I pondered the possibility of a more ancient Cimbri connection as they along with the Angles originate from the same area and Cimbri are usually called Celtic. The Cimbri ended up in Tolouse and the Pyrenees, as well norther Italy so they sort of spread out nicely where SRY2627 is found today. They also are not too far off from our brother Norwegian Viking clade of L165. So maybe SRY2627 has a nordic origins and then migrated southwards towards Iberia and Italy."

I can certainly see that as possibility too. L165 is probably our best evidence of this. I'll use a bit of logic that has been used against those of us who propose such scenarios.. We shouldn't put much weight in one far-flung sample (L165 in Spain) that could have arrived there in more recent times.

"I brought up that theory for the north/south cluster in a different forum, the North Sea origin, then moving west into England and south into France and Spain.  I was quickly pounced upon."

Tell me about it! I've been accused of not liking the results and not wanting to accept them for suggesting such theories. I've always found it funny that the people who are quickest to "correct" us, aren't even DF27. As I've said in the past, these types of theories throw a wrench in a lot of the pet theories of people who belong to our sibling haplogroups. So of course they jump all over anyone who doesn't accept their theories.
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« Reply #534 on: June 17, 2013, 10:35:52 PM »

I think SRY2627 people will fall under a similar category like the N/S variety. When SRY2627 related snp's begin to show up I think we will see a drastic difference in the Northern and Southern varieties. Too bad its not as far along in finding new snp's as other branches of DF27.
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« Reply #535 on: June 18, 2013, 07:17:17 AM »

I think SRY2627 people will fall under a similar category like the N/S variety. When SRY2627 related snp's begin to show up I think we will see a drastic difference in the Northern and Southern varieties. Too bad its not as far along in finding new snp's as other branches of DF27.

Hopefully between Richard Rocca's second go at the 1000 genomes project and the few DF27 full genome tests, we should be getting enough information back to help identify new snps.
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William B. Webb
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« Reply #536 on: June 19, 2013, 02:21:57 AM »

I think SRY2627 people will fall under a similar category like the N/S variety. When SRY2627 related snp's begin to show up I think we will see a drastic difference in the Northern and Southern varieties. Too bad its not as far along in finding new snp's as other branches of DF27.

Hopefully between Richard Rocca's second go at the 1000 genomes project and the few DF27 full genome tests, we should be getting enough information back to help identify new snps.

More SNP testing can only be a good thing. I hope we get something out of it.

Arch
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Brousse
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« Reply #537 on: June 19, 2013, 08:01:33 AM »

Are the SRY2627  FTDNA study group like say my Group A0 Family Groups?
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R1b1a2a1a1b5a Sry2627+ My family was exiled from Cognac France in 1685 Lived in London for 15 years then on to America to the Manikin town settlement for French Protestants in 1700
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« Reply #538 on: June 26, 2013, 03:11:53 PM »

Are the SRY2627  FTDNA study group like say my Group A0 Family Groups?

What the SRY2627+ Project's group A0 members have in common is DYS490 = 10; group A0, like other groups in the SRY2627+ Project, is not really a family group. As members of that group test SNPs under SRY2627+ (CTS8289+, Z207+, and CTS4299+, for example), those members will probably be moved to other groups in the project if they test positive for any SNP known to be downstream from SRY2627+.

Stephen
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« Reply #539 on: June 26, 2013, 07:34:18 PM »

A0 is one of many groups in that study with DYS490=10
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R1b1a2a1a1b5a Sry2627+ My family was exiled from Cognac France in 1685 Lived in London for 15 years then on to America to the Manikin town settlement for French Protestants in 1700
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« Reply #540 on: June 27, 2013, 05:54:39 AM »

Are the SRY2627  FTDNA study group like say my Group A0 Family Groups?

What the SRY2627+ Project's group A0 members have in common is DYS490 = 10; group A0, like other groups in the SRY2627+ Project, is not really a family group. As members of that group test SNPs under SRY2627+ (CTS8289+, Z207+, and CTS4299+, for example), those members will probably be moved to other groups in the project if they test positive for any SNP known to be downstream from SRY2627+.

Stephen

What intrigues me how I am not in a group with Alberti when he's my closest GD at 67 markers tested. The other one is how many unusual markers I have with L165 types and I'm not 'clustered' near them.

Arch
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Brousse
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« Reply #541 on: June 27, 2013, 06:56:56 AM »

what group are you in Arch?
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R1b1a2a1a1b5a Sry2627+ My family was exiled from Cognac France in 1685 Lived in London for 15 years then on to America to the Manikin town settlement for French Protestants in 1700
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« Reply #542 on: June 27, 2013, 01:26:27 PM »

Are the SRY2627  FTDNA study group like say my Group A0 Family Groups?

What the SRY2627+ Project's group A0 members have in common is DYS490 = 10; group A0, like other groups in the SRY2627+ Project, is not really a family group. As members of that group test SNPs under SRY2627+ (CTS8289+, Z207+, and CTS4299+, for example), those members will probably be moved to other groups in the project if they test positive for any SNP known to be downstream from SRY2627+.

Stephen

What intrigues me how I am not in a group with Alberti when he's my closest GD at 67 markers tested. The other one is how many unusual markers I have with L165 types and I'm not 'clustered' near them.

Arch

Arch -

Knowing that your terminal SNP is L659+, I am wondering whether you have any SNPs between SRY2627+ and L659+ and/or if you might have any SNPs downstream from L659+. If your Walk the Y results were used to make it possible for Geno 2.0 participants to test L659+, you might be able to take a free Geno 2.0 test. Let me see what I can find out.

Stephen
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« Reply #543 on: June 27, 2013, 01:30:15 PM »

what group are you in Arch?

He is in group A0.

Stephen
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Y-DNA: R-SRY2627+ (terminal SNP: R-CTS4299+)
mtDNA: H2a2a1
Administrator, Parrish/Parish, Maxfield, and Wrigley DNA Projects
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« Reply #544 on: June 27, 2013, 01:37:57 PM »

This past weekend, I accepted an invitation to become a co-administrator of Family Tree DNA's Y Haplogroup R SRY2627+/L176.2+/Z198+ Project.

Stephen
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Y-DNA: R-SRY2627+ (terminal SNP: R-CTS4299+)
mtDNA: H2a2a1
Administrator, Parrish/Parish, Maxfield, and Wrigley DNA Projects
Administrator, Maryland DNA Project
Co-administrator, Early New England Colonist, SRY2627+, and DF27+ Projects
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« Reply #545 on: June 28, 2013, 01:02:59 AM »

Congrats!

Arch
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« Reply #546 on: June 28, 2013, 09:17:21 AM »

Congrats!

Arch

Arch -

Thanks! :)

Stephen
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« Reply #547 on: June 30, 2013, 05:53:24 PM »

Are the SRY2627  FTDNA study group like say my Group A0 Family Groups?

What the SRY2627+ Project's group A0 members have in common is DYS490 = 10; group A0, like other groups in the SRY2627+ Project, is not really a family group. As members of that group test SNPs under SRY2627+ (CTS8289+, Z207+, and CTS4299+, for example), those members will probably be moved to other groups in the project if they test positive for any SNP known to be downstream from SRY2627+.

Stephen

I received some news from FTDNA regarding the test for CTS 4299-- they "had to redesign the primers used for this specific SNP (basically construct a new way of testing for the SNP to make it more reliable). "  The process is on hold with no definite timetable.  However, those of you who may have tested for this marker may wish to have the test re-run once they redesign it...
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« Reply #548 on: July 03, 2013, 01:45:01 PM »

Are the SRY2627  FTDNA study group like say my Group A0 Family Groups?

What the SRY2627+ Project's group A0 members have in common is DYS490 = 10; group A0, like other groups in the SRY2627+ Project, is not really a family group. As members of that group test SNPs under SRY2627+ (CTS8289+, Z207+, and CTS4299+, for example), those members will probably be moved to other groups in the project if they test positive for any SNP known to be downstream from SRY2627+.

Stephen

I received some news from FTDNA regarding the test for CTS 4299-- they "had to redesign the primers used for this specific SNP (basically construct a new way of testing for the SNP to make it more reliable). "  The process is on hold with no definite timetable.  However, those of you who may have tested for this marker may wish to have the test re-run once they redesign it...

Jason -

How will the news that you received from FTDNA affect FTDNA SRY2627+/L176.2+/Z198+ project members who found out by testing directly with FTDNA that they have CTS4299+?

Stephen

Stephen
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Y-DNA: R-SRY2627+ (terminal SNP: R-CTS4299+)
mtDNA: H2a2a1
Administrator, Parrish/Parish, Maxfield, and Wrigley DNA Projects
Administrator, Maryland DNA Project
Co-administrator, Early New England Colonist, SRY2627+, and DF27+ Projects
Jason Bourgeois
Project Coordinator
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« Reply #549 on: July 03, 2013, 06:45:22 PM »

Are the SRY2627  FTDNA study group like say my Group A0 Family Groups?

What the SRY2627+ Project's group A0 members have in common is DYS490 = 10; group A0, like other groups in the SRY2627+ Project, is not really a family group. As members of that group test SNPs under SRY2627+ (CTS8289+, Z207+, and CTS4299+, for example), those members will probably be moved to other groups in the project if they test positive for any SNP known to be downstream from SRY2627+.

Stephen

I received some news from FTDNA regarding the test for CTS 4299-- they "had to redesign the primers used for this specific SNP (basically construct a new way of testing for the SNP to make it more reliable). "  The process is on hold with no definite timetable.  However, those of you who may have tested for this marker may wish to have the test re-run once they redesign it...

Jason -

How will the news that you received from FTDNA affect FTDNA SRY2627+/L176.2+/Z198+ project members who found out by testing directly with FTDNA that they have CTS4299+?

Stephen

Stephen

My result was run and came back CTS4299+ yesterday.  I would recommend that the project group administrators contact FTDNA and request that this test be re-run for the other members as well.
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