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samIsaack
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« Reply #275 on: September 30, 2012, 07:59:30 PM »

Additionally, I was researching the Yeoman line from Dryburgh and Roxburgh up in Scotland and I find the coat of arms quite disturbing. One has a hand throwing a dart against a black background and the heart is bleeding. Reminds me of some pirate flags with spears or darts and hearts bleeding. The other coat of arms has two arrows piercing through the heart. It reminds of skulls and crossbones. Maybe my lineage is closer to around this area with a distant connection to Bristol. I do recall somebody of great importance being involved with Sir Robert Yeamans or William Yeamans, and he was from Scotland. I will have to go back through my Bristol research papers. I'm almost 100% some important figurehead from Scotland was instrumental in assisting the Yeamans family in Bristol.

Arch

Weird how things are working out for us. I had long thought my Isaacs were Scottish and you had long thought your Yeomans were English. Seems like things have flip-flopped on us! If your not Scottish and do go back to Bristol then we were essentially neighbors at one time! I'd say we made it up to Southwest England in the same manner as well.

I have finally convinced my cousin to test for us! We're supposed to have something set up and going by this week. He let me in on his family history or rather how we started using the surname Isaac..

"Our  family story is this that our surname originated during or after the Crusade of Richard I (Lion-Heart) in the 1190s and that our farm was bestowed by him in reward of Crusader service.  (I've read that returning crusaders often gave their children Old Testament names to showcase that religious/political service--although my family claims that Richard I personally bestowed the Isaac name.)  When surnames became common in England around 1500, some of those crusader names became censused as surnames."

I find my Isaac crest rather boring! It's a simple gold cross with purple and blue coloring in the background.

http://www.houseofnames.com/isaacs-family-crest

It is pretty cool that the surname was first found in Devon.. Looks like if this guy turns out SRY2627 then I have not only found the old country, I've also found the area of origin for my last name.

Two birds with one stone!
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Y-Dna: R1b-SRY2627

Mtdna: J1c8
Arch Y.
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« Reply #276 on: October 01, 2012, 12:05:11 AM »

Additionally, I was researching the Yeoman line from Dryburgh and Roxburgh up in Scotland and I find the coat of arms quite disturbing. One has a hand throwing a dart against a black background and the heart is bleeding. Reminds me of some pirate flags with spears or darts and hearts bleeding. The other coat of arms has two arrows piercing through the heart. It reminds of skulls and crossbones. Maybe my lineage is closer to around this area with a distant connection to Bristol. I do recall somebody of great importance being involved with Sir Robert Yeamans or William Yeamans, and he was from Scotland. I will have to go back through my Bristol research papers. I'm almost 100% some important figurehead from Scotland was instrumental in assisting the Yeamans family in Bristol.

Arch

Weird how things are working out for us. I had long thought my Isaacs were Scottish and you had long thought your Yeomans were English. Seems like things have flip-flopped on us! If your not Scottish and do go back to Bristol then we were essentially neighbors at one time! I'd say we made it up to Southwest England in the same manner as well.

I have finally convinced my cousin to test for us! We're supposed to have something set up and going by this week. He let me in on his family history or rather how we started using the surname Isaac..

"Our  family story is this that our surname originated during or after the Crusade of Richard I (Lion-Heart) in the 1190s and that our farm was bestowed by him in reward of Crusader service.  (I've read that returning crusaders often gave their children Old Testament names to showcase that religious/political service--although my family claims that Richard I personally bestowed the Isaac name.)  When surnames became common in England around 1500, some of those crusader names became censused as surnames."

I find my Isaac crest rather boring! It's a simple gold cross with purple and blue coloring in the background.

http://www.houseofnames.com/isaacs-family-crest

It is pretty cool that the surname was first found in Devon.. Looks like if this guy turns out SRY2627 then I have not only found the old country, I've also found the area of origin for my last name.

Two birds with one stone!

That will be interesting to see the shift from Scotland to Devon. Ironically, this area is supposed to be SRY2627+ rich in comparison to the rest of Britain. I would hope so because that brings the odds up higher for Bristol perhaps. According to House of Names, my surname originated in the West Country of Gloucester. Bristol historically falls within Gloucester and Somerset. Interestingly, I made contact with a Goodall and it looks like she can trace her lineage back to Sir John Yeamans. I know along with the Colstons and Canns, the Goodalls pop up every once in a while. I wish I could convince her to have somebody along her paternal line to test.

Arch
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razyn
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« Reply #277 on: October 01, 2012, 01:36:44 PM »

Is there some reason to believe House of Names?  That commercial coat-of-arms peddling stuff seems sort of an intrusion, in what has more typically been a discussion of actual Y-DNA, paper trails, and so on.

That being said, I tend to agree that the SW corner of England, border country with Wales, Bristol Channel etc. probably had more DF27 lines than Scotland, and maybe more than Ireland too.  There aren't enough pins for that (DF27 and subclades) on the map yet to tell, but it looks plausible for some of the subclades, anyhow.
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R1b Z196*
samIsaack
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« Reply #278 on: October 01, 2012, 05:58:38 PM »

Is there some reason to believe House of Names?  That commercial coat-of-arms peddling stuff seems sort of an intrusion, in what has more typically been a discussion of actual Y-DNA, paper trails, and so on.

That being said, I tend to agree that the SW corner of England, border country with Wales, Bristol Channel etc. probably had more DF27 lines than Scotland, and maybe more than Ireland too.  There aren't enough pins for that (DF27 and subclades) on the map yet to tell, but it looks plausible for some of the subclades, anyhow.

No, I was just showing Arch what my crest looks like. I don't like the website/company either, but it does have a few bits of useful info. It wasn't the focus of the conversation (until now), so I don't see what the problem is.

Any theories or speculations for DF27 showing up more in these regions? Tin trade with France/Iberia? Gaulish spill over?




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Y-Dna: R1b-SRY2627

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razyn
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« Reply #279 on: October 01, 2012, 07:16:14 PM »

Theories, sure.  Tin trade, and the rest of whatever they were trading.  But then I think that applies to most of the earlier DF27 clades.  Whether I'm right remains to be seen; it's just a pattern I think I've observed in some remnant clades that are very distant kin of each other (and don't look at all Iberian).  Others don't think I've observed correctly, and I'm OK with that -- it was a long time ago, and they aren't very close kin to me.  Nor to anybody else now living.
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samIsaack
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« Reply #280 on: October 02, 2012, 06:28:13 AM »

Additionally, I was researching the Yeoman line from Dryburgh and Roxburgh up in Scotland and I find the coat of arms quite disturbing. One has a hand throwing a dart against a black background and the heart is bleeding. Reminds me of some pirate flags with spears or darts and hearts bleeding. The other coat of arms has two arrows piercing through the heart. It reminds of skulls and crossbones. Maybe my lineage is closer to around this area with a distant connection to Bristol. I do recall somebody of great importance being involved with Sir Robert Yeamans or William Yeamans, and he was from Scotland. I will have to go back through my Bristol research papers. I'm almost 100% some important figurehead from Scotland was instrumental in assisting the Yeamans family in Bristol.

Arch

Weird how things are working out for us. I had long thought my Isaacs were Scottish and you had long thought your Yeomans were English. Seems like things have flip-flopped on us! If your not Scottish and do go back to Bristol then we were essentially neighbors at one time! I'd say we made it up to Southwest England in the same manner as well.

I have finally convinced my cousin to test for us! We're supposed to have something set up and going by this week. He let me in on his family history or rather how we started using the surname Isaac..

"Our  family story is this that our surname originated during or after the Crusade of Richard I (Lion-Heart) in the 1190s and that our farm was bestowed by him in reward of Crusader service.  (I've read that returning crusaders often gave their children Old Testament names to showcase that religious/political service--although my family claims that Richard I personally bestowed the Isaac name.)  When surnames became common in England around 1500, some of those crusader names became censused as surnames."

I find my Isaac crest rather boring! It's a simple gold cross with purple and blue coloring in the background.

http://www.houseofnames.com/isaacs-family-crest

It is pretty cool that the surname was first found in Devon.. Looks like if this guy turns out SRY2627 then I have not only found the old country, I've also found the area of origin for my last name.

Two birds with one stone!

That will be interesting to see the shift from Scotland to Devon. Ironically, this area is supposed to be SRY2627+ rich in comparison to the rest of Britain. I would hope so because that brings the odds up higher for Bristol perhaps. According to House of Names, my surname originated in the West Country of Gloucester. Bristol historically falls within Gloucester and Somerset. Interestingly, I made contact with a Goodall and it looks like she can trace her lineage back to Sir John Yeamans. I know along with the Colstons and Canns, the Goodalls pop up every once in a while. I wish I could convince her to have somebody along her paternal line to test.

Arch

I've always heard that too, that Southwest England is rich in M167. I was casually browsing through some of the projects that have English SRY2627 earlier today.. And most of the people who could report an ancestral location were reporting Western and Southwestern Counties. I'm wondering what the distribution of DF27/SRY2627 would be in Wales? Seems fair to reason that it would be a bit high.. Well high for this scattered, singleton percentage group.
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Y-Dna: R1b-SRY2627

Mtdna: J1c8
Isidro
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« Reply #281 on: October 04, 2012, 12:00:45 PM »

I think Razyn has a point about DF27 older clades (Z196 and L176+) traveling together, I would include also surviving P312* and some odd older clades.

I see no logic in thinking that once we find a P312* or Z196*or L176.2* that they split into another tribe with a different movement and dispersal areas.

I think all these R1b as a group traveled together (as part of the totally ignored other haplogroups that are not R1b) and they seem old enough to have done it 1000BC or earlier.
If we  ignore the L176.2+ frequency hot spot areas as irrelevant to locate ancient movement patterns we find L176.2+ with  low percentages across Europe but quite spread which it could be a sign that it spread with some major sister early clades mentioned above.

My guess is that DF27+ canvas is Atlantic and L21 and U152 still unclear but it must have been related to P312. Also U106 origins is a puzzle but looking for meaning of all the R1b clades in Europe to an obscure departure point and expansion route that justifies the spread of IE language is weak. I see no one tracing Iberian Language or Basque language traveling inland Europe, only Italo-Celtic...

Another angle about the population and growth of cities in Europe I would like to see finds that claim a European North-South  spread of cities, forts,metal ores you name it....

Nothing I can see in Europe points a North South significant movements both cultural and demographic until the fall of The Roman Empire.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2012, 12:01:36 PM by Isidro » Logged

Haplogroups
Y-DNA    R1b1a2a1a1b5    Shorthand    R-L176.2 mtDNA    HV  23andMe: HV0

M269+ P312+ Z196+ L176.2+ Z198+

Z262- U152- U106- SRY2627- P66- M65- M37- M222- M153- L21- L165-

samIsaack
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« Reply #282 on: October 07, 2012, 12:26:43 PM »

Since the discovery of this new connection to Devonshire, I have opened up to alot of different possibilities for my Y-line.

I've been studying my family crest/coat of arms and have taken particular note of the Golden Fleury Cross which adorns it. This particular Cross type is often found in French Heraldry. The cross seems to represent either Crusader service, which my Devonshire cousins seem to believe it means, or it may represent Norman ancestry.

I'm reading with particular interest about the De Cusack family of Aquitaine.. Which were apart of the Norman Invasions of England and Ireland. Though it seems the name in its original form has died out in England. That doesn't rule out the possibilty of the name being anglicised to De Isaac and then just Isaac. I've also read casual mention of a De Isaac, Norman lord, being in England. Though there is nothing to substaniate this.

Either option seems likely to me, but when factoring in that the line is SRY2627 it becomes all the more tempting to associate it with the Norman De Cusacks. 
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samIsaack
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« Reply #283 on: October 10, 2012, 10:35:30 AM »

I was browsing the SRY2627 wikipedia page today and noticed that another study had been conducted on SRY2627 in 2012. I've either read it and forgot about it already or it was just recently published!

Either way, I noticed one of the new regions (La Rioja) with a relatively high ammount is not being displayed on the map provided. Infact, it is left as blank! When in actuality, it is showing 15 percent for the subclade.

"A 2012 study by Martinez-Cruz et al. found the following percentages of SRY2627: 7% in the three French departments of the Pays de Basque, 16% in Bearn, 14% in Bigorre, 7% in Chalosse, 6% in the Basque regions of Spain, 15% in La Rioja, and 19% in northern Aragon."

Of this, two issues have come to mind. The map needs to be updated with this new information; The French need to drop their ridiculous law against genetic testing for genealogical purposes!

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Y-Dna: R1b-SRY2627

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samIsaack
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« Reply #284 on: October 16, 2012, 12:28:44 PM »

I may have made another major breakthrough in my genealogical quest. I've discovered two possible sources for my Isaack family of Devon..

http://books.google.com/books?id=GmqlIibS95IC&pg=PA501&lpg=PA501&dq=Isacke+of+Polslowe&source=bl&ots=whMsJ5W4hJ&sig=rKdRPpF0DFIK164Fd0UwUV7wkXw&hl=en&sa=X&ei=jRh7UJS4H_SI2gWPv4CQDw&ved=0CCAQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=Isacke%20of%20Polslowe&f=false

The first pedigree listed for the Isacke of Polslowe is the one that would make sense from a geographical standpoint. As it is within Exeter, whereas the second Isack of Buryott is in the northern province of the county.

For the Isacke of Polslowe there are numerous Samuel's in that family tree. One of which may be my Samuel Isaack. He was baptised in June of 1693, which I'm assuming means he was born in 1692 as they often waited a year before the baptism.. unless I'm mistaken. This Samuel is shown as a dead-end, which I'm thinking means that he simply left and no more records of his life could be kept. This is a perfect fit for our group.. as the old family lore on my side of the family, has always had his birthdate anywhere from the 1680's to the 1690's.

On down the pedigree, where I believe my newly found cousin would appear, is littered with Williams and Johns.. which are commonplace for his branch. These are much later down the tree and fall into the same time period where his branch is currently brickwalled.

What's really interesting about this group is that their ancestry isn't Devon based, rather it is out of Kent. The surname is Patronymic, in that it derives from an Isacke of Polslowe.

Another bit of info I'm wondering about.. There is a Johannes Isaack listed as being the son of the Isaack of polslowe.. I'm wondering if this signifies some sort of Germanic ancestry? I know Johannes is the latin form of John.. but from what I've seen of it, it seems that it is particularly popular amongst the northern germanic groups of the time. The name Erasmus also appears early on in the pedigree, which from what I gather is/was also popular in Nordic regions.

From what I understand the Jutes held a kingdom in eastern Kent.. I dunno, maybe I'm reading too much into all of this! An interesting possibility none the less.
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Y-Dna: R1b-SRY2627

Mtdna: J1c8
samIsaack
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« Reply #285 on: October 16, 2012, 01:11:34 PM »

Wrong location. nevermind!
« Last Edit: October 16, 2012, 01:29:23 PM by samIsaack » Logged

Y-Dna: R1b-SRY2627

Mtdna: J1c8
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« Reply #286 on: October 26, 2012, 04:53:01 AM »

At least you can eliminate. I keep an Excel database of all the surname genealogies I came across, even if I find no relation afterwards. It helps to cross off the ones that don't match what you're looking for because you will run into them several times through other lines. Maybe that's the thrill of genealogy is finding those possibilities and eliminating them one-by-one when its confirmed there is no connection to your lineage; to me its frustrating and disappointing at times. Keep the faith, at least you have the science of DNA to back you up.

Arch
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Arch Y.
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« Reply #287 on: October 26, 2012, 04:56:20 AM »

I was browsing the SRY2627 wikipedia page today and noticed that another study had been conducted on SRY2627 in 2012. I've either read it and forgot about it already or it was just recently published!

Either way, I noticed one of the new regions (La Rioja) with a relatively high ammount is not being displayed on the map provided. Infact, it is left as blank! When in actuality, it is showing 15 percent for the subclade.

"A 2012 study by Martinez-Cruz et al. found the following percentages of SRY2627: 7% in the three French departments of the Pays de Basque, 16% in Bearn, 14% in Bigorre, 7% in Chalosse, 6% in the Basque regions of Spain, 15% in La Rioja, and 19% in northern Aragon."

Of this, two issues have come to mind. The map needs to be updated with this new information; The French need to drop their ridiculous law against genetic testing for genealogical purposes!



I think its a later study that pulled in data from an earlier paper. I've been out of the country for a few weeks and will have dig around through some materials. If I'm not mistaken, the University of Toulouse is doing a major study on Pyrenean populations--hopefully this research will validate the earlier studies.

Arch
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Arch Y.
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« Reply #288 on: October 26, 2012, 05:00:06 AM »

I think Razyn has a point about DF27 older clades (Z196 and L176+) traveling together, I would include also surviving P312* and some odd older clades.

I see no logic in thinking that once we find a P312* or Z196*or L176.2* that they split into another tribe with a different movement and dispersal areas.

I think all these R1b as a group traveled together (as part of the totally ignored other haplogroups that are not R1b) and they seem old enough to have done it 1000BC or earlier.
If we  ignore the L176.2+ frequency hot spot areas as irrelevant to locate ancient movement patterns we find L176.2+ with  low percentages across Europe but quite spread which it could be a sign that it spread with some major sister early clades mentioned above.

My guess is that DF27+ canvas is Atlantic and L21 and U152 still unclear but it must have been related to P312. Also U106 origins is a puzzle but looking for meaning of all the R1b clades in Europe to an obscure departure point and expansion route that justifies the spread of IE language is weak. I see no one tracing Iberian Language or Basque language traveling inland Europe, only Italo-Celtic...

Another angle about the population and growth of cities in Europe I would like to see finds that claim a European North-South  spread of cities, forts,metal ores you name it....

Nothing I can see in Europe points a North South significant movements both cultural and demographic until the fall of The Roman Empire.

Maybe I'm seeing it differently. Bell Beaker from Iberia, spreading northwards up the Atlantic coastline and upwards through the Rhone Valley. Urnfield Culture definitely seems to be north-south from Central Europe into Northern Iberia (mostly Catalonia and Aragon).

Arch
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Jason Bourgeois
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« Reply #289 on: October 26, 2012, 11:35:14 AM »

I was browsing the SRY2627 wikipedia page today and noticed that another study had been conducted on SRY2627 in 2012. I've either read it and forgot about it already or it was just recently published!

Either way, I noticed one of the new regions (La Rioja) with a relatively high ammount is not being displayed on the map provided. Infact, it is left as blank! When in actuality, it is showing 15 percent for the subclade.

"A 2012 study by Martinez-Cruz et al. found the following percentages of SRY2627: 7% in the three French departments of the Pays de Basque, 16% in Bearn, 14% in Bigorre, 7% in Chalosse, 6% in the Basque regions of Spain, 15% in La Rioja, and 19% in northern Aragon."

Of this, two issues have come to mind. The map needs to be updated with this new information; The French need to drop their ridiculous law against genetic testing for genealogical purposes!



The quote from the Wikipedia article above was added after the map had been posted, so that is why the map is not updated.
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samIsaack
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« Reply #290 on: October 26, 2012, 02:42:22 PM »

At least you can eliminate. I keep an Excel database of all the surname genealogies I came across, even if I find no relation afterwards. It helps to cross off the ones that don't match what you're looking for because you will run into them several times through other lines. Maybe that's the thrill of genealogy is finding those possibilities and eliminating them one-by-one when its confirmed there is no connection to your lineage; to me its frustrating and disappointing at times. Keep the faith, at least you have the science of DNA to back you up.

Arch

I do something to the extent of keeping files of possible lineages.. Well, I write down specific names here and there and its somewhat scattered lol.. But thats just my process. I'm sort of lucky in that there aren't too many Isaac families out there.. I can, as you say, eliminate and widdle it down quite a bit. Though I'm nearly positive this Isacke of Polslowe is my guy. On the dna thing, I figured instead doing the deep-clade thing, that it would be more cost efficient to just test for SRY2627 and be done with it. Thanks for the encouragement, Arch. Good luck to you as well.. You'll get there someday.
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Y-Dna: R1b-SRY2627

Mtdna: J1c8
samIsaack
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« Reply #291 on: October 26, 2012, 02:47:26 PM »

I was browsing the SRY2627 wikipedia page today and noticed that another study had been conducted on SRY2627 in 2012. I've either read it and forgot about it already or it was just recently published!

Either way, I noticed one of the new regions (La Rioja) with a relatively high ammount is not being displayed on the map provided. Infact, it is left as blank! When in actuality, it is showing 15 percent for the subclade.

"A 2012 study by Martinez-Cruz et al. found the following percentages of SRY2627: 7% in the three French departments of the Pays de Basque, 16% in Bearn, 14% in Bigorre, 7% in Chalosse, 6% in the Basque regions of Spain, 15% in La Rioja, and 19% in northern Aragon."

Of this, two issues have come to mind. The map needs to be updated with this new information; The French need to drop their ridiculous law against genetic testing for genealogical purposes!



The quote from the Wikipedia article above was added after the map had been posted, so that is why the map is not updated.

I know, that was just my subtle way of complaining about the lack of discussion and focus on SRY2627. I was spoiled early on because we were the only DF27 clade besides M153 and its starting to show that we aren't as significant as we once were.
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Y-Dna: R1b-SRY2627

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Isidro
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« Reply #292 on: October 26, 2012, 08:29:04 PM »

I think Razyn has a point about DF27 older clades (Z196 and L176+) traveling together, I would include also surviving P312* and some odd older clades.

I see no logic in thinking that once we find a P312* or Z196*or L176.2* that they split into another tribe with a different movement and dispersal areas.

I think all these R1b as a group traveled together (as part of the totally ignored other haplogroups that are not R1b) and they seem old enough to have done it 1000BC or earlier.
If we  ignore the L176.2+ frequency hot spot areas as irrelevant to locate ancient movement patterns we find L176.2+ with  low percentages across Europe but quite spread which it could be a sign that it spread with some major sister early clades mentioned above.

My guess is that DF27+ canvas is Atlantic and L21 and U152 still unclear but it must have been related to P312. Also U106 origins is a puzzle but looking for meaning of all the R1b clades in Europe to an obscure departure point and expansion route that justifies the spread of IE language is weak. I see no one tracing Iberian Language or Basque language traveling inland Europe, only Italo-Celtic...

Another angle about the population and growth of cities in Europe I would like to see finds that claim a European North-South  spread of cities, forts,metal ores you name it....

Nothing I can see in Europe points a North South significant movements both cultural and demographic until the fall of The Roman Empire.

Maybe I'm seeing it differently. Bell Beaker from Iberia, spreading northwards up the Atlantic coastline and upwards through the Rhone Valley. Urnfield Culture definitely seems to be north-south from Central Europe into Northern Iberia (mostly Catalonia and Aragon).

Arch

I should not write things so categorically and with more precision;I meant to say "nothing I can see in Europe points  the arrival of R1b in Iberia coming north of the Pyrenees".
I am not sure about the Bell Beakers, I think it's becoming some kind of a construct with too many complex findings across the Continent to call it people expanding in one direction. Way too complex for me to see anything clear.

Do you think SRY2627 is associated with the movements of U152 more than other DF27 branches ? based on frequency found so far.My train of thought is that if it is found very scattered all over  it couldn't be that young, although a small size branch is scattered.
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Haplogroups
Y-DNA    R1b1a2a1a1b5    Shorthand    R-L176.2 mtDNA    HV  23andMe: HV0

M269+ P312+ Z196+ L176.2+ Z198+

Z262- U152- U106- SRY2627- P66- M65- M37- M222- M153- L21- L165-

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« Reply #293 on: November 25, 2012, 02:41:11 AM »

The family organization has decided to go for the Geno 2.0 test for my cousin's kit, which is Z262.  I can see from the preliminary reports of which paternal SNPs are included in the test, that there are 10 SNPs near Z262 and SRY2627 which will be resolved for that kit by taking the test.
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Arch Y.
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« Reply #294 on: December 05, 2012, 03:12:50 AM »

10 SNPs? That should be interesting.

Arch
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« Reply #295 on: December 10, 2012, 02:47:06 PM »

My Geno 2.0 results, which arrived this morning, reveal the presence of a new SNP, designated as CTS4299, downstream from SRY2627+.

I will post more information about CTS4299 as soon as possible after more information arrives about it.

Stephen
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« Reply #296 on: December 10, 2012, 05:17:15 PM »

Over in U106, this is what we've found:

Earlier Female Kit:  154,611 total SNPs, 12,438 empty Y-SNPs, 336 non-Y no-calls,
Charles:     154,476 total SNPs, 12,316 Y-SNPs, 347 total no-calls, 66 Y no-calls
Ray:     154,476 total SNPs, 12,316 Y-SNPs, 431 total no-calls, 67 Y no-calls

So there is a reduction in the total amount of SNPs and Y-SNPs being reported since the first kit data was released.

And there are at least three kinds of no-calls, "I", "D" and "-"

Edit:  I'm informed my no-call count includes Deletes and Insertions, and that the dash is the only real no-call.  I'll have to redo my count when I get a chance.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2012, 05:39:23 PM by DavidCar » Logged
DavidCar
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« Reply #297 on: December 13, 2012, 08:19:43 PM »

There are three kits in the SRY2627 project, SRY2627+, that have Geno 2.0 results.  There are so many SNPs common to 154890 and 5185 but not in 97633 that it seems to be more of a reporting problem than an actual difference, so I'm not mentioning those.  There seems to be a similar problem in U106.  Other differences are:

154890   (NO CTS4299+) (NO M173+)        M269+  (NO P25+)        PF742+  (NO Z207+)
5185       (NO CTS4299+) (NO M173+) (NO M269+)        P25+  (NO PF742+)        Z207+
97633            CTS4299+         M173+         M269+         P25+  (NO PF742+)        Z207+

It looks like Z262 causes a false positive in the Geno 2.0 chip results and is not being reported.  The Z207+ and P25+ common to the second two kits seems to put them in the same branch, with the last kit having a further SNP at CTS4299+.  The top kit also has a unique SNP at PF742+.  The M269+ doesn't fit the pattern, and may be a false reading.  Just guessing.
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« Reply #298 on: December 21, 2012, 10:28:08 PM »

There are three kits in the SRY2627 project, SRY2627+, that have Geno 2.0 results.  There are so many SNPs common to 154890 and 5185 but not in 97633 that it seems to be more of a reporting problem than an actual difference, so I'm not mentioning those.  There seems to be a similar problem in U106.  Other differences are:

154890   (NO CTS4299+) (NO M173+)        M269+  (NO P25+)        PF742+  (NO Z207+)
5185       (NO CTS4299+) (NO M173+) (NO M269+)        P25+  (NO PF742+)        Z207+
97633            CTS4299+         M173+         M269+         P25+  (NO PF742+)        Z207+

It looks like Z262 causes a false positive in the Geno 2.0 chip results and is not being reported.  The Z207+ and P25+ common to the second two kits seems to put them in the same branch, with the last kit having a further SNP at CTS4299+.  The top kit also has a unique SNP at PF742+.  The M269+ doesn't fit the pattern, and may be a false reading.  Just guessing.

I was just comparing kit 97633 raw data with the FTDNA upload, and found that three of the SNPs I listed above are absent from the raw data, namely M173, M269 and P25.  They are still listed in the FTDNA upload.
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« Reply #299 on: December 30, 2012, 03:58:24 AM »

I was wondering if upgrading to the Gene 2.0 of the Genographic Project is worth it. I participated in the first run, but I am completely unsure what benefit I would gain or additional knowledge could be learned from participating again.

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