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DavidCar
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« Reply #250 on: September 01, 2012, 02:04:13 PM »



Here's a thought.  If you tested for L147.3 and it came back positive, you would know that you were Z198+, but that somehow the Z198 test was inconclusive.  If the L147.3 test came back negative, or didn't produce an answer, then it wouldn't tell you as much.  Or you could save up for a Geno 2.0 test rather than take another single SNP test.

I am contemplating this Genome 2.0.   I think $30 per SNP is is more like I share a research expense more than buying a product.

It seems like after 2 months after  the due date the only thing I will hear from FTDNA is a result - or + there is no signs or updates. I am really not interested in my money back, too much hassle. They are not the only DNA testing company out there and I know from my own line of business if I don't do follow ups I will loose them as costumers.



Still, it's interesting to compare the similarities and differences in the STRs of your kit and the L147.2+ kits.  You seem to be closer to L147.2 than the other Z262- kits in some of your markers, but not others.
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Isidro
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« Reply #251 on: September 02, 2012, 12:56:40 PM »



[/quote]
DavidCar

Still, it's interesting to compare the similarities and differences in the STRs of your kit and the L147.2+ kits.  You seem to be closer to L147.2 than the other Z262- kits in some of your markers, but not others.
[/quote]

Thanks for the suggestions. Although I read World Family Forums R1b and Subclades often I am not deep into it as much.
I will look into what you described with L143.2 STR's comparisons and  overall picture, it does sound worthy.Is there a place online where I can see the data you described?, I know about Y-Search but I have the feeling is another source.

Isidro
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Haplogroups
Y-DNA    R1b1a2a1a1b5    Shorthand    R-L176.2 mtDNA    HV  23andMe: HV0

M269+ P312+ Z196+ L176.2+ Z198+

Z262- U152- U106- SRY2627- P66- M65- M37- M222- M153- L21- L165-

DavidCar
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« Reply #252 on: September 02, 2012, 02:33:45 PM »



DavidCar

Still, it's interesting to compare the similarities and differences in the STRs of your kit and the L147.2+ kits.  You seem to be closer to L147.2 than the other Z262- kits in some of your markers, but not others.
[/quote]

Thanks for the suggestions. Although I read World Family Forums R1b and Subclades often I am not deep into it as much.
I will look into what you described with L143.2 STR's comparisons and  overall picture, it does sound worthy.Is there a place online where I can see the data you described?, I know about Y-Search but I have the feeling is another source.

Isidro
[/quote]

This is where I was looking for a comparison:

http://www.familytreedna.com/public/R1b1c6/default.aspx?section=ycolorized

Just above the section showing the group that is Z262- it shows the three people who are L143.2+.  Those in the Z262- section that are proven L143.2- are Turnbull, Miller, Pleis and Mas. 

For example, I notice that the first four STRs of the L143.2+ group are 13-24-14-10, but you're the only one in the Z262- group with those numbers.  That's not consistent through the whole list, but it's interesting to do the comparison. 

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DavidCar
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« Reply #253 on: September 20, 2012, 01:15:39 AM »

I notice that both Z198 and L143.2 are now listed as being under investigation for placement on the official ISOGG tree.
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samIsaack
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« Reply #254 on: September 20, 2012, 09:26:07 PM »

I mentioned this on another thread, but I want to repost here and discuss the meaning of my recent discoveries.

I have recently matched an Isaac from Devon, England with a Gd of 1 to 2 at 37 markers depending on the person from my group.

This guy isn't SRY2627 confirmed yet, but I am working on that angle. I will be very surprised if he doesn't show up positive for this marker.

Another interesting piece to this puzzle that I have been looking at is individual from Brittany. We have a faily high gd, but he is displaying the 392=14 trait and is 490=12. So I'm thinking he may be a relic of my Y-lines migration from France to the Southern Coast of England.

I'm guessing if this all follows through then I would be the result of an ancient Gaul migrating up into England or something like that. Nothings set in stone, just some preliminary speculation.
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Isidro
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« Reply #255 on: September 21, 2012, 10:31:40 AM »



Just above the section showing the group that is Z262- it shows the three people who are L143.2+.  Those in the Z262- section that are proven L143.2- are Turnbull, Miller, Pleis and Mas.  

For example, I notice that the first four STRs of the L143.2+ group are 13-24-14-10, but you're the only one in the Z262- group with those numbers.  That's not consistent through the whole list, but it's interesting to do the comparison.  






That is interesting, 13-24-14-10 is significant if it also matches L176.2. I do have to say that at 12 markers I have thousands of matches across all branches of P312+ and a few U106 but when it comes to 25 marker closest matches are England and Germany.
It could be due to volume of tested people .
Then again I think that the first 12 marker set was picked as a formula to track deep ancestry and FTDNA hotspots for me are Scotland and Switzerland (Swiss might be biased for a clan of related individuals, it used to be 10% 4 years ago)

Country            Match Total    Country Total        Percentage

Switzerland              52                       1844                 2.8%    
Scotland                296                     11425                 2.6%              
 Northern Ireland      17                         816                 2.1%
England                    448                 23931                 1.9%
Wales                      39                     2029                 1.9%
France                      61                       3366                 1.8%
United Kingdom    188                     10657                 1.8%
Ireland                    245                     14064                 1.7%
Netherlands              25                       1709                 1.5%
Iceland                        2                         147                 1.4%
Norway                      18                       1335                 1.3%
Spain                      43                       3351                 1.3%

Now those above are 12 marker exact matches, I do have the WAMH with a STR=393=10 instead of 11.
 

« Last Edit: September 21, 2012, 10:34:37 AM by Isidro » Logged

Haplogroups
Y-DNA    R1b1a2a1a1b5    Shorthand    R-L176.2 mtDNA    HV  23andMe: HV0

M269+ P312+ Z196+ L176.2+ Z198+

Z262- U152- U106- SRY2627- P66- M65- M37- M222- M153- L21- L165-

Isidro
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« Reply #256 on: September 21, 2012, 11:18:10 AM »

I mentioned this on another thread, but I want to repost here and discuss the meaning of my recent discoveries.

I have recently matched an Isaac from Devon, England with a Gd of 1 to 2 at 37 markers depending on the person from my group.

This guy isn't SRY2627 confirmed yet, but I am working on that angle. I will be very surprised if he doesn't show up positive for this marker.

Another interesting piece to this puzzle that I have been looking at is individual from Brittany. We have a faily high gd, but he is displaying the 392=14 trait and is 490=12. So I'm thinking he may be a relic of my Y-lines migration from France to the Southern Coast of England.

I'm guessing if this all follows through then I would be the result of an ancient Gaul migrating up into England or something like that. Nothings set in stone, just some preliminary speculation.

That is a pretty good lead at 37 markers I do hope it pans out.

I agree with you about the overall Gaul migration, perhaps also in my case although my oldest Y Line is Valencia region double sets of surnames (mother line and father line back to late 1700' point North to the Pyrenees region, on my mother's side the surname Galindo does sound like Gaul related but I have no origin source other than Aragon .
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Haplogroups
Y-DNA    R1b1a2a1a1b5    Shorthand    R-L176.2 mtDNA    HV  23andMe: HV0

M269+ P312+ Z196+ L176.2+ Z198+

Z262- U152- U106- SRY2627- P66- M65- M37- M222- M153- L21- L165-

samIsaack
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« Reply #257 on: September 21, 2012, 04:03:03 PM »

I mentioned this on another thread, but I want to repost here and discuss the meaning of my recent discoveries.

I have recently matched an Isaac from Devon, England with a Gd of 1 to 2 at 37 markers depending on the person from my group.

This guy isn't SRY2627 confirmed yet, but I am working on that angle. I will be very surprised if he doesn't show up positive for this marker.

Another interesting piece to this puzzle that I have been looking at is individual from Brittany. We have a faily high gd, but he is displaying the 392=14 trait and is 490=12. So I'm thinking he may be a relic of my Y-lines migration from France to the Southern Coast of England.

I'm guessing if this all follows through then I would be the result of an ancient Gaul migrating up into England or something like that. Nothings set in stone, just some preliminary speculation.

That is a pretty good lead at 37 markers I do hope it pans out.

I agree with you about the overall Gaul migration, perhaps also in my case although my oldest Y Line is Valencia region double sets of surnames (mother line and father line back to late 1700' point North to the Pyrenees region, on my mother's side the surname Galindo does sound like Gaul related but I have no origin source other than Aragon .


Well, now I'm not so sure! I discovered that this person is actually an American and I'm not entirely sure his ancestry is out of Devon. You see, my surname or rather his surname "Isaac" is very commonly associated with Devon.  A coat of arms was granted to the Isaac family of Devonshire in the reign of Henry III. So, this person could have easily read that and assumed, based on their surname, that they would have origins in this area.

From what I gather this guy was originally from Oregon. This is also a red flag, as there is a specific branch from my main Isaacks branch that went to Oregon and changed the surname to "Isaac". His ancestral trail also ends farily recent and doesn't specify as to where. He just has it listed as being born in 1841 and date of death for 1912. So I'm guessing he is listing his Grandfather as his mdka.

I'm not sure at this point! He could just be an American with a confused sense of where his ancestral roots lie.
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razyn
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« Reply #258 on: September 21, 2012, 04:11:07 PM »

IMO a good 37 marker match with your surname is going to prove something more interesting than the Devon bit -- which is probably nowhere near as old as SRY2627, anyhow.
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« Reply #259 on: September 21, 2012, 04:28:06 PM »

I mentioned this on another thread, but I want to repost here and discuss the meaning of my recent discoveries.

I have recently matched an Isaac from Devon, England with a Gd of 1 to 2 at 37 markers depending on the person from my group.

This guy isn't SRY2627 confirmed yet, but I am working on that angle. I will be very surprised if he doesn't show up positive for this marker.

Another interesting piece to this puzzle that I have been looking at is individual from Brittany. We have a faily high gd, but he is displaying the 392=14 trait and is 490=12. So I'm thinking he may be a relic of my Y-lines migration from France to the Southern Coast of England.

I'm guessing if this all follows through then I would be the result of an ancient Gaul migrating up into England or something like that. Nothings set in stone, just some preliminary speculation.

That is a pretty good lead at 37 markers I do hope it pans out.

I agree with you about the overall Gaul migration, perhaps also in my case although my oldest Y Line is Valencia region double sets of surnames (mother line and father line back to late 1700' point North to the Pyrenees region, on my mother's side the surname Galindo does sound like Gaul related but I have no origin source other than Aragon .


Well, now I'm not so sure! I discovered that this person is actually an American and I'm not entirely sure his ancestry is out of Devon. You see, my surname or rather his surname "Isaac" is very commonly associated with Devon.  A coat of arms was granted to the Isaac family of Devonshire in the reign of Henry III. So, this person could have easily read that and assumed, based on their surname, that they would have origins in this area.

From what I gather this guy was originally from Oregon. This is also a red flag, as there is a specific branch from my main Isaacks branch that went to Oregon and changed the surname to "Isaac". His ancestral trail also ends farily recent and doesn't specify as to where. He just has it listed as being born in 1841 and date of death for 1912. So I'm guessing he is listing his Grandfather as his mdka.

I'm not sure at this point! He could just be an American with a confused sense of where his ancestral roots lie.


According to the Devon project background page, a requirement for joining the project is that participants must have a documented paper trail to Devon?
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samIsaack
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« Reply #260 on: September 21, 2012, 04:32:55 PM »

I mentioned this on another thread, but I want to repost here and discuss the meaning of my recent discoveries.

I have recently matched an Isaac from Devon, England with a Gd of 1 to 2 at 37 markers depending on the person from my group.

This guy isn't SRY2627 confirmed yet, but I am working on that angle. I will be very surprised if he doesn't show up positive for this marker.

Another interesting piece to this puzzle that I have been looking at is individual from Brittany. We have a faily high gd, but he is displaying the 392=14 trait and is 490=12. So I'm thinking he may be a relic of my Y-lines migration from France to the Southern Coast of England.

I'm guessing if this all follows through then I would be the result of an ancient Gaul migrating up into England or something like that. Nothings set in stone, just some preliminary speculation.

That is a pretty good lead at 37 markers I do hope it pans out.

I agree with you about the overall Gaul migration, perhaps also in my case although my oldest Y Line is Valencia region double sets of surnames (mother line and father line back to late 1700' point North to the Pyrenees region, on my mother's side the surname Galindo does sound like Gaul related but I have no origin source other than Aragon .


Well, now I'm not so sure! I discovered that this person is actually an American and I'm not entirely sure his ancestry is out of Devon. You see, my surname or rather his surname "Isaac" is very commonly associated with Devon.  A coat of arms was granted to the Isaac family of Devonshire in the reign of Henry III. So, this person could have easily read that and assumed, based on their surname, that they would have origins in this area.

From what I gather this guy was originally from Oregon. This is also a red flag, as there is a specific branch from my main Isaacks branch that went to Oregon and changed the surname to "Isaac". His ancestral trail also ends farily recent and doesn't specify as to where. He just has it listed as being born in 1841 and date of death for 1912. So I'm guessing he is listing his Grandfather as his mdka.

I'm not sure at this point! He could just be an American with a confused sense of where his ancestral roots lie.


According to the Devon project background page, a requirement for joining the project is that participants must have a documented paper trail to Devon?

Thats true, I forgot about that.
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samIsaack
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« Reply #261 on: September 21, 2012, 04:43:04 PM »

IMO a good 37 marker match with your surname is going to prove something more interesting than the Devon bit -- which is probably nowhere near as old as SRY2627, anyhow.

I personally don't match him that closely.. I have a few off-modal markers from the rest of the group and we are actually at a Gd of 6 at 37 markers. Whereas with some members he is at a Gd of 1 to three.

His ancestry to Devon is fairly recent and only goes back to 1912. Which, now that I remembered you have to have an actual paper trail to join the devon project, is all the more encouraging. As they do not accept Americans with ancestry to Devon who do not have a fairly recent link.
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samIsaack
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« Reply #262 on: September 23, 2012, 04:18:50 PM »

I've not heard from my potential cousin yet, perhaps he doesn't want to associate with his hillbilly kin :)

At any rate, I have been able to find out how he ended up stateside. It seems his Father moved to Kansas back in the early 1900's. His family was originally from Braunton, Devon, where they had been farmers for as far back as I am currently able to trace.

From what I've been able to trace, the family has been in Devon since at least the late 1700's.

This is pure speculation and I have mentioned this on dna-forums, but I'm thinking the family may have further roots in Cornwall and that the surname may be of the Cornish language.

I'm thinking the surname may some how be related to Port Isaac, which in Cornish is "Porthysek" which was further Anglicised to "Porth Izzick" and eventually to its modern spelling of Port Isaac. I've found quite a few "Isaack's" in Devon from the early 1600's and I'm assuming that the name was originally spelt that way for my modern day Isaac cousins as well.

My original ancestor, Samuel Isaack, did not spell his name with an "s" at the end of it and it seems it was later changed by county clerks/officials to Isaacks. All of the early documents that have my families signatures on them always spelt the name Isaac.

I forgot to mention this earlier, but the person from Brittany is also SRY2627 confirmed and is listed in the SRY2627 project.
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« Reply #263 on: September 23, 2012, 07:33:00 PM »

I've not heard from my potential cousin yet, perhaps he doesn't want to associate with his hillbilly kin :)

At any rate, I have been able to find out how he ended up stateside. It seems his Father moved to Kansas back in the early 1900's. His family was originally from Braunton, Devon, where they had been farmers for as far back as I am currently able to trace.

From what I've been able to trace, the family has been in Devon since at least the late 1700's.

This is pure speculation and I have mentioned this on dna-forums, but I'm thinking the family may have further roots in Cornwall and that the surname may be of the Cornish language.

I'm thinking the surname may some how be related to Port Isaac, which in Cornish is "Porthysek" which was further Anglicised to "Porth Izzick" and eventually to its modern spelling of Port Isaac. I've found quite a few "Isaack's" in Devon from the early 1600's and I'm assuming that the name was originally spelt that way for my modern day Isaac cousins as well.

My original ancestor, Samuel Isaack, did not spell his name with an "s" at the end of it and it seems it was later changed by county clerks/officials to Isaacks. All of the early documents that have my families signatures on them always spelt the name Isaac.

I forgot to mention this earlier, but the person from Brittany is also SRY2627 confirmed and is listed in the SRY2627 project.

With all the variants of surnames and the adoption of other surnames, it certainly makes genealogy a real time intensive task; perhaps more suitable for retirees than working folk. I completely understand the frustration and temptation for wanting to associate with place names, etc. I think the odds are more in your favor of your surname being tied to patrynomic event rather than placename or occupation. Mine is frustrating because it could mean a son of a yeoman or is connected with young man or servant. So I have a mixed bag and scrolling through genealogical records is frustrating because of how the English classified the term yeoman as a status within society as a whole.

My only hope right now is finding another SRY2627 person and tying the surname to mine or one of its variants. Right now I am heavily focused on Tune because there is documentation about James Tune who is apparently related to a James Yeomans in Rappahannock County within the Northern Neck of Virginia. It appears both were heavily vested in Tobacco plantations in the area. I'm trying to find a connection to Simon Yeomans (fishmonger) who was a merchant that vested with the Virginia Company. Also, the Yeamans of Barbados or Yeomans were involved in sugar plantations in Barbados--earlier it was tobacco but it didn't do as well as sugar.

My understanding that many of the immigrants to North America in the mid to early 1600s went by way of Barbados and northwards. Bermuda was kind of an off and on thing and a mere fluke of rediscovery with the famous Sea Venture. I am really interested in the Yeamans of Bristol, Barbados, and South Carolina and would like to know if the lines connect anywhere in Virginia. I never really considered this region because my immediate line has always been in the New England region. But I am finding interesting tidbits of history, even if I am coming up empty handed for genealogical information. The searching is part of the adventure!

Arch

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samIsaack
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« Reply #264 on: September 24, 2012, 12:41:42 AM »

I've not heard from my potential cousin yet, perhaps he doesn't want to associate with his hillbilly kin :)

At any rate, I have been able to find out how he ended up stateside. It seems his Father moved to Kansas back in the early 1900's. His family was originally from Braunton, Devon, where they had been farmers for as far back as I am currently able to trace.

From what I've been able to trace, the family has been in Devon since at least the late 1700's.

This is pure speculation and I have mentioned this on dna-forums, but I'm thinking the family may have further roots in Cornwall and that the surname may be of the Cornish language.

I'm thinking the surname may some how be related to Port Isaac, which in Cornish is "Porthysek" which was further Anglicised to "Porth Izzick" and eventually to its modern spelling of Port Isaac. I've found quite a few "Isaack's" in Devon from the early 1600's and I'm assuming that the name was originally spelt that way for my modern day Isaac cousins as well.

My original ancestor, Samuel Isaack, did not spell his name with an "s" at the end of it and it seems it was later changed by county clerks/officials to Isaacks. All of the early documents that have my families signatures on them always spelt the name Isaac.

I forgot to mention this earlier, but the person from Brittany is also SRY2627 confirmed and is listed in the SRY2627 project.

With all the variants of surnames and the adoption of other surnames, it certainly makes genealogy a real time intensive task; perhaps more suitable for retirees than working folk. I completely understand the frustration and temptation for wanting to associate with place names, etc. I think the odds are more in your favor of your surname being tied to patrynomic event rather than placename or occupation. Mine is frustrating because it could mean a son of a yeoman or is connected with young man or servant. So I have a mixed bag and scrolling through genealogical records is frustrating because of how the English classified the term yeoman as a status within society as a whole.

My only hope right now is finding another SRY2627 person and tying the surname to mine or one of its variants. Right now I am heavily focused on Tune because there is documentation about James Tune who is apparently related to a James Yeomans in Rappahannock County within the Northern Neck of Virginia. It appears both were heavily vested in Tobacco plantations in the area. I'm trying to find a connection to Simon Yeomans (fishmonger) who was a merchant that vested with the Virginia Company. Also, the Yeamans of Barbados or Yeomans were involved in sugar plantations in Barbados--earlier it was tobacco but it didn't do as well as sugar.

My understanding that many of the immigrants to North America in the mid to early 1600s went by way of Barbados and northwards. Bermuda was kind of an off and on thing and a mere fluke of rediscovery with the famous Sea Venture. I am really interested in the Yeamans of Bristol, Barbados, and South Carolina and would like to know if the lines connect anywhere in Virginia. I never really considered this region because my immediate line has always been in the New England region. But I am finding interesting tidbits of history, even if I am coming up empty handed for genealogical information. The searching is part of the adventure!

Arch



At this point I'd have to say it's a 50/50 shot of being either of Patronymic or Place name.. But most likely is Patronymic and could possibly be from Wales. As Isaac occurs most frequently in Southern Wales. I don't know what I did with it, but a kind fellow from dna forums mailed me a map displaying this dominance a couple years back.

I also recieved an email from my "cousin" and it turns out that his family emigrated here a bit earlier than I had originally thought. His Great Grandfather came over in the 1870's and they settled into Kansas. They were originally from Whitestone, which is just outside of Exetor, Devonshire.

He says hes not interested in doing any furthing testing.. story of my life!! Hopefully I can convince him to deep-clade test.. which if he was interested in learning more about this I would suggest to test to at least 67 markers.. Though I'd rather just have confirmation that he is infact SRY2627 positive.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2012, 12:42:25 AM by samIsaack » Logged

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« Reply #265 on: September 24, 2012, 04:51:57 PM »

I know it's really frustrating to get more people to test. No less to get those who tested from 12 to 37 markers. It's almost pointless why 12 marker tests are offered anymore. 37 markers are close, but not good enough. A long wish of mine is that 67 markers become the standard test, but this is not going to happen--not for a long while.

I would love for people who have ancestry from the Northern Neck of Virginia in the 1600s and towards Jamestown to test. Last night I came across the Colston line in Rappahannock County in the Farnham Parish. What are the odds? This family is very strongly connected with the Yeamans line in Bristol during the Civil War. I was quite surprised to come across this information as William Colston (son of the famous Edward Colston) arrived to Rappahannock nearly the same time period as James Yeomans is identified as having arrived by around 1651.

I know what you mean about the frustration when people start their DNA testing or genealogical research and then altogether stop; especially if it's helping you out.

Arch
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samIsaack
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« Reply #266 on: September 24, 2012, 07:54:30 PM »

I know it's really frustrating to get more people to test. No less to get those who tested from 12 to 37 markers. It's almost pointless why 12 marker tests are offered anymore. 37 markers are close, but not good enough. A long wish of mine is that 67 markers become the standard test, but this is not going to happen--not for a long while.

I would love for people who have ancestry from the Northern Neck of Virginia in the 1600s and towards Jamestown to test. Last night I came across the Colston line in Rappahannock County in the Farnham Parish. What are the odds? This family is very strongly connected with the Yeamans line in Bristol during the Civil War. I was quite surprised to come across this information as William Colston (son of the famous Edward Colston) arrived to Rappahannock nearly the same time period as James Yeomans is identified as having arrived by around 1651.

I know what you mean about the frustration when people start their DNA testing or genealogical research and then altogether stop; especially if it's helping you out.

Arch

Thats what I don't understand.. What is the point of doing the test up to 37 markers and then just suddenly stopping and saying your not doing anymore? I explained to him that my little group has been researching and trying to figure out where we came from for the past hundred or so years... And that his dna may hold the key to helping us finally solve this mystery.. I even offered to set up a donation for the testing that is required.. We'll see what happens, hopefully, I can find another male Isaac from this region.. I know there are quite a few walking around there to this day..

I've managed to get him further back in his family tree to a John Isaac of Coldridge, Devonshire who was a Yeoman/Farmer in the region and was born there around 1768. This is really getting interesting for me, since I'm getting ever closer to linking up my Samuel Isaac who had to have been born somewhere near there in the 1680's. They have a long list of Christenings/Baptism's, but they all seem to stop with this John.. I'm thinking he may have been the first to move this region from either a different part of England or maybe even Wales. Its just a hop and a skip to Southern Wales from Devonshire.. Cornwall is also a strong possibility.

I feel your pain in doing Northern Virginia research.. Thats all I've been doing since I got into this little hobby a few years back. If you were not Anglican, your basically out of luck with regards to records being kept. Most were either lost, never kept, or destroyed during the Revoloutionary or Civil war's. Northern Virginia was also home to alot of Dissenters, so that further compounds the problem.
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« Reply #267 on: September 25, 2012, 02:59:51 AM »

I know it's really frustrating to get more people to test. No less to get those who tested from 12 to 37 markers. It's almost pointless why 12 marker tests are offered anymore. 37 markers are close, but not good enough. A long wish of mine is that 67 markers become the standard test, but this is not going to happen--not for a long while.

I would love for people who have ancestry from the Northern Neck of Virginia in the 1600s and towards Jamestown to test. Last night I came across the Colston line in Rappahannock County in the Farnham Parish. What are the odds? This family is very strongly connected with the Yeamans line in Bristol during the Civil War. I was quite surprised to come across this information as William Colston (son of the famous Edward Colston) arrived to Rappahannock nearly the same time period as James Yeomans is identified as having arrived by around 1651.

I know what you mean about the frustration when people start their DNA testing or genealogical research and then altogether stop; especially if it's helping you out.

Arch

Thats what I don't understand.. What is the point of doing the test up to 37 markers and then just suddenly stopping and saying your not doing anymore? I explained to him that my little group has been researching and trying to figure out where we came from for the past hundred or so years... And that his dna may hold the key to helping us finally solve this mystery.. I even offered to set up a donation for the testing that is required.. We'll see what happens, hopefully, I can find another male Isaac from this region.. I know there are quite a few walking around there to this day..

I've managed to get him further back in his family tree to a John Isaac of Coldridge, Devonshire who was a Yeoman/Farmer in the region and was born there around 1768. This is really getting interesting for me, since I'm getting ever closer to linking up my Samuel Isaac who had to have been born somewhere near there in the 1680's. They have a long list of Christenings/Baptism's, but they all seem to stop with this John.. I'm thinking he may have been the first to move this region from either a different part of England or maybe even Wales. Its just a hop and a skip to Southern Wales from Devonshire.. Cornwall is also a strong possibility.

I feel your pain in doing Northern Virginia research.. Thats all I've been doing since I got into this little hobby a few years back. If you were not Anglican, your basically out of luck with regards to records being kept. Most were either lost, never kept, or destroyed during the Revoloutionary or Civil war's. Northern Virginia was also home to alot of Dissenters, so that further compounds the problem.

The problem with records being lost or destroyed because of fire is really discouraging. I have two areas of focus, Boston and Rappahnannock County, Virginia where both events happened and of course in the time frames where valuable information is missing. For Boston, it was around the late 1800s and Rappahannock anything before 1650 I think is pretty much destroyed. Of course, being established from Lancaster County and that county from Northumberland County I believe really complicates things. Interesting that Colston was a county records keeper for Rappahannock around the same time frame that records are suddenly missing. Hmmmm.... -_-  perhaps there are skeletons in the closet here.

Arch
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samIsaack
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« Reply #268 on: September 26, 2012, 08:03:00 AM »

I know it's really frustrating to get more people to test. No less to get those who tested from 12 to 37 markers. It's almost pointless why 12 marker tests are offered anymore. 37 markers are close, but not good enough. A long wish of mine is that 67 markers become the standard test, but this is not going to happen--not for a long while.

I would love for people who have ancestry from the Northern Neck of Virginia in the 1600s and towards Jamestown to test. Last night I came across the Colston line in Rappahannock County in the Farnham Parish. What are the odds? This family is very strongly connected with the Yeamans line in Bristol during the Civil War. I was quite surprised to come across this information as William Colston (son of the famous Edward Colston) arrived to Rappahannock nearly the same time period as James Yeomans is identified as having arrived by around 1651.

I know what you mean about the frustration when people start their DNA testing or genealogical research and then altogether stop; especially if it's helping you out.

Arch

Thats what I don't understand.. What is the point of doing the test up to 37 markers and then just suddenly stopping and saying your not doing anymore? I explained to him that my little group has been researching and trying to figure out where we came from for the past hundred or so years... And that his dna may hold the key to helping us finally solve this mystery.. I even offered to set up a donation for the testing that is required.. We'll see what happens, hopefully, I can find another male Isaac from this region.. I know there are quite a few walking around there to this day..

I've managed to get him further back in his family tree to a John Isaac of Coldridge, Devonshire who was a Yeoman/Farmer in the region and was born there around 1768. This is really getting interesting for me, since I'm getting ever closer to linking up my Samuel Isaac who had to have been born somewhere near there in the 1680's. They have a long list of Christenings/Baptism's, but they all seem to stop with this John.. I'm thinking he may have been the first to move this region from either a different part of England or maybe even Wales. Its just a hop and a skip to Southern Wales from Devonshire.. Cornwall is also a strong possibility.

I feel your pain in doing Northern Virginia research.. Thats all I've been doing since I got into this little hobby a few years back. If you were not Anglican, your basically out of luck with regards to records being kept. Most were either lost, never kept, or destroyed during the Revoloutionary or Civil war's. Northern Virginia was also home to alot of Dissenters, so that further compounds the problem.

The problem with records being lost or destroyed because of fire is really discouraging. I have two areas of focus, Boston and Rappahnannock County, Virginia where both events happened and of course in the time frames where valuable information is missing. For Boston, it was around the late 1800s and Rappahannock anything before 1650 I think is pretty much destroyed. Of course, being established from Lancaster County and that county from Northumberland County I believe really complicates things. Interesting that Colston was a county records keeper for Rappahannock around the same time frame that records are suddenly missing. Hmmmm.... -_-  perhaps there are skeletons in the closet here.

Arch

It is discouraging at times to know that you may never find info based on such events.. At the same time, it can confirm certain things. When it comes to church records, parish lists and so on, it can give you a better idea of what faith they practiced. Since your not finding any records I'd say your family was likely of dissenter background as well, wasn't it? I've seen parish lists that go way back to some of first settlers arriving in the early 1600's for regions like the Northern Neck. That group kept some good records. Every Anglican parish list I've ever seen for Frederick, Old Orange or Clarke do not include my ancestors. They signed a sort of agreement in which they refuted transubstantiation, but this doesn't say much besides they were protestant. Its like until the 1800's no records were kept for my clan. Then they suddenly appear in the Baptists and Methodist sects.. Kind of funny.. Some of the later church records indicate that one of my relations, Samuel Isaacs, had been kicked out of the church for drinking too much "spirituous liquour" and blaspheming the name of God.. Maybe this is why I can't find anything lol
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« Reply #269 on: September 26, 2012, 11:07:57 PM »

LOL good presumption! Maybe my ancestry is full of pirates, dissenters and outlaws. If I find a connection to Sir John Yeamans, I might not be that far off the mark. LOL! Arggh, me matey!! I do find a few Yeomans and Yeamans in Barbados, some in Jamaica and a few in Antigua and Barbuda. The scary part is how Sir John Yeamans ship, the Hopewell is being sold by a Francis Yeaman(s) in Charlestown, MA and it ends up being signed to an agent of David Kirke (most Quebecois will know who he is). The other scary part is that in Farnham Parish I find William Colston who's lineage is from Bristol. There is a Richard Kirke I believe in Old Rappahannock County. Kinsale, just north of Farnham, which I believe was originally Pharnham was a smuggling haven. They eventually built a fort on the Yeocomico River as it enters the Potomac to protect against pirate ships in the late 1670s. I wonder if FTDNA can do DNA testing on wooden peg legs. LOL.

Arch
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« Reply #270 on: September 26, 2012, 11:12:57 PM »

Additionally, I was researching the Yeoman line from Dryburgh and Roxburgh up in Scotland and I find the coat of arms quite disturbing. One has a hand throwing a dart against a black background and the heart is bleeding. Reminds me of some pirate flags with spears or darts and hearts bleeding. The other coat of arms has two arrows piercing through the heart. It reminds of skulls and crossbones. Maybe my lineage is closer to around this area with a distant connection to Bristol. I do recall somebody of great importance being involved with Sir Robert Yeamans or William Yeamans, and he was from Scotland. I will have to go back through my Bristol research papers. I'm almost 100% some important figurehead from Scotland was instrumental in assisting the Yeamans family in Bristol.

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DavidCar
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« Reply #271 on: September 28, 2012, 01:45:02 AM »

I see Isidro finally came in Z198+, which doesn't rule out L147.3.

(It looks like in a bunch of my previous posts I was referring to L147.3 using the wrong SNP number)
« Last Edit: September 28, 2012, 01:50:15 AM by DavidCar » Logged
Isidro
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« Reply #272 on: September 28, 2012, 09:13:25 AM »

I see Isidro finally came in Z198+, which doesn't rule out L147.3.

(It looks like in a bunch of my previous posts I was referring to L147.3 using the wrong SNP number)

Wow when I least expected, I just sent FTDNA my address yesterday to get a new test kit...
Soooo ... who is Z198- ?. All this time I thought it was related to L165 but I see that everyone tested is Z198+ including SRY2627 mega branch.
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Haplogroups
Y-DNA    R1b1a2a1a1b5    Shorthand    R-L176.2 mtDNA    HV  23andMe: HV0

M269+ P312+ Z196+ L176.2+ Z198+

Z262- U152- U106- SRY2627- P66- M65- M37- M222- M153- L21- L165-

DavidCar
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« Reply #273 on: September 28, 2012, 12:19:55 PM »

I see Isidro finally came in Z198+, which doesn't rule out L147.3.

(It looks like in a bunch of my previous posts I was referring to L147.3 using the wrong SNP number)

Wow when I least expected, I just sent FTDNA my address yesterday to get a new test kit...
Soooo ... who is Z198- ?. All this time I thought it was related to L165 but I see that everyone tested is Z198+ including SRY2627 mega branch.

Every L176.2 who tested Z198 has come back positive.  FTDNA labs, according to one of their websites, has tested someone who came back Z198- but we don't know who it is.  I think according to the original researchers into the 1000 Genomes data, they have it placed at the same level L176.2, and not in parallel branches such as Z209/Z220 or DF17.  But that has not been confirmed by FTDNA tests.  If you would have come back Z198-, that would have been newsworthy. 
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Isidro
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« Reply #274 on: September 29, 2012, 09:15:08 AM »

I see Isidro finally came in Z198+, which doesn't rule out L147.3.

(It looks like in a bunch of my previous posts I was referring to L147.3 using the wrong SNP number)

Wow when I least expected, I just sent FTDNA my address yesterday to get a new test kit...
Soooo ... who is Z198- ?. All this time I thought it was related to L165 but I see that everyone tested is Z198+ including SRY2627 mega branch.

Every L176.2 who tested Z198 has come back positive.  FTDNA labs, according to one of their websites, has tested someone who came back Z198- but we don't know who it is.  I think according to the original researchers into the 1000 Genomes data, they have it placed at the same level L176.2, and not in parallel branches such as Z209/Z220 or DF17.  But that has not been confirmed by FTDNA tests.  If you would have come back Z198-, that would have been newsworthy. 

I see, thanks for that information David.It does look like Z198 is between Z196 and L176.2, it will be interesting to find out it's frequency and who knows like so many others L176.2 might become irrelevant and it will go something like (as of today?)P312---DF27----Z196----Z198--- if all 176.2 are Z198+ it is a redundant mark and less accurate than Z198 since some could be - and others +

I had fun for awhile with L176.2 but to be honest it felt like describing a radio station as 176.2 FM

Mon Dieu
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Haplogroups
Y-DNA    R1b1a2a1a1b5    Shorthand    R-L176.2 mtDNA    HV  23andMe: HV0

M269+ P312+ Z196+ L176.2+ Z198+

Z262- U152- U106- SRY2627- P66- M65- M37- M222- M153- L21- L165-

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