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Author Topic: the return of the Franco-Cantabrian refugium theory  (Read 818 times)
IALEM
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« on: March 09, 2012, 04:57:43 AM »

This is MtDNA study, I don´t have acces to the full text, however in the abstract it is claimed that In contrast with genome-wide analysis and Y chromosome data, where the problem of poor time estimates remains, a new timescale has been established for the human mtDNA and makes this genome the most informative marker for studying European prehistory

Conclussions of the study:
We thus characterize the maternal ancestry of 908 Basque and non-Basque individuals from the Basque Country and immediate adjacent regions and, by sequencing 420 complete mtDNA genomes, we focused on haplogroup H. We identified six mtDNA haplogroups, H1j1, H1t1, H2a5a1, H1av1, H3c2a, and H1e1a1, which are autochthonous to the Franco-Cantabrian region and, more specifically, to Basque-speaking populations. We detected signals of the expansion of these haplogroups at ∼4,000 years before present (YBP) and estimated their separation from the pan-European gene pool at ∼8,000 YBP, antedating the Indo-European arrival to the region. Our results clearly support the hypothesis of a partial genetic continuity of contemporary Basques with the preceding Paleolithic/Mesolithic settlers of their homeland.
AJHG Vol 90, 3, february 2012
http://www.cell.com/AJHG/retrieve/pii/S0002929712000328
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MDKA Lope de Arriçabalaga, born c. 1390 in Azcoitia, Basque Country

alan trowel hands.
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« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2012, 01:51:56 PM »

This is MtDNA study, I don´t have acces to the full text, however in the abstract it is claimed that In contrast with genome-wide analysis and Y chromosome data, where the problem of poor time estimates remains, a new timescale has been established for the human mtDNA and makes this genome the most informative marker for studying European prehistory

Conclussions of the study:
We thus characterize the maternal ancestry of 908 Basque and non-Basque individuals from the Basque Country and immediate adjacent regions and, by sequencing 420 complete mtDNA genomes, we focused on haplogroup H. We identified six mtDNA haplogroups, H1j1, H1t1, H2a5a1, H1av1, H3c2a, and H1e1a1, which are autochthonous to the Franco-Cantabrian region and, more specifically, to Basque-speaking populations. We detected signals of the expansion of these haplogroups at ∼4,000 years before present (YBP) and estimated their separation from the pan-European gene pool at ∼8,000 YBP, antedating the Indo-European arrival to the region. Our results clearly support the hypothesis of a partial genetic continuity of contemporary Basques with the preceding Paleolithic/Mesolithic settlers of their homeland.
AJHG Vol 90, 3, february 2012
http://www.cell.com/AJHG/retrieve/pii/S0002929712000328

A date of 6000BC separating from the rest of the poll is totally incompatible with the Franco-Cantabrian theory.  The whole point of that theory was the idea of a bottled up ice age population who repopulated Europe in the Magdallenian phase.  That is far older than that.  6000BC is not far of the date of the Cardial farmers arriving in Iberia, albeit not the Basque country as such.   
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IALEM
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« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2012, 10:46:23 AM »

As I said I haven´t read the paper, so I am just guessing, but I guess the idea is that since the separation is Mesolithic then continuity from Paleolithic is assumed since it predates the arrival of Neolithic inmigrants. Certainly it is a very thin argument and totally dependant on a very precise datation system that they claim they got
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MDKA Lope de Arriçabalaga, born c. 1390 in Azcoitia, Basque Country

JeanL
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« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2012, 01:14:01 PM »

Hi IALEM, I wanted to ask you something: I see that you MDKA Lope de Arriçabalaga, born c. 1390 in Azcoitia, Basque Country, I found the following person on my family tree:

Juan Ygnacio Arrizavalaga Ortuzar born in Azcoitia in 1708, he is the son of Pedro Arrizavalaga, I wonder if we are related via that link?

« Last Edit: March 12, 2012, 02:37:05 PM by JeanL » Logged
IALEM
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« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2012, 06:41:33 AM »

Well, most probably, I don´t have those names in my genealogical tree, but it is not complete all the way. Ignacio and Pedro are traditional names in my family and coming from Azcoitia I would say there is a very high probability we are related, where did you find those names and how are you related to them?
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MDKA Lope de Arriçabalaga, born c. 1390 in Azcoitia, Basque Country

JeanL
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« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2012, 02:59:34 PM »

I found them checking the baptismal records at different churches throughout Euskadi.

The link is via my maternal grandfather who was born in Lizarra, Navarra. His maternal great-grandfather was from Zegama, Guipuzcoa, and is a descendant of Juan Ygnacio Arrizavalaga who was born in Azcoitia in 1708.
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