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A.D.
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« on: November 24, 2011, 09:14:29 PM »

The plague was mentioned on a thread and it got me thinking people who have contracted Cowpox (non fatal) have a greater resistance to smallpox (fatal). So i was wondering if R1b types are linked to pastoralism and lactose persistence hence had greater exposure to cowpox, wouldn't that allow R1b types to survive the various out breaks in far greater numbers. Could this in part explain it's large  numbers.  e.g. if say the bronze age crash in Ireland was due to  or accompanied by a smallpox epidemic.  I say Ireland because the legends speak of plagues and we know of a population crash. 
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NealtheRed
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« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2011, 09:26:10 PM »

The plague was mentioned on a thread and it got me thinking people who have contracted Cowpox (non fatal) have a greater resistance to smallpox (fatal). So i was wondering if R1b types are linked to pastoralism and lactose persistence hence had greater exposure to cowpox, wouldn't that allow R1b types to survive the various out breaks in far greater numbers. Could this in part explain it's large  numbers.  e.g. if say the bronze age crash in Ireland was due to  or accompanied by a smallpox epidemic.  I say Ireland because the legends speak of plagues and we know of a population crash.  

I always thought the immunity to smallpox was due to higher incidences of blood type O, hence the near disappearance of blood type A in the Americas during the European colonization.

No doubt lactase persistence would confer a genetic edge to the Indo-Europeans. They had a consistent energy source through dairy products, not to mention higher protein consumption.

I should add that R1b has an intimate relationship with pastoralism considering Northern Europeans' lactose tolerance levels.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2011, 09:28:21 PM by NealtheRed » Logged

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A.D.
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« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2011, 10:41:38 PM »

I heard about the cowpox/smallpox link at school apparently it was milkmaids that had the immunity from milking the cows, direct contact, as for ingestion I don't know.
Blood type o is quite common in my area  which used to be quite pastoral but I haven't found anything about smallpox in the local history. 
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rms2
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« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2011, 09:11:37 AM »

Blood type is A is pretty common in Europe, so I don't think it makes one particularly susceptible to death from smallpox.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2011, 09:11:50 AM by rms2 » Logged

NealtheRed
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« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2011, 09:29:22 AM »

Blood type is A is pretty common in Europe, so I don't think it makes one particularly susceptible to death from smallpox.
Blood type A seems to confer a resistance to Bubonic Plague, so blood type O would have seen a large decrease during that time.
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rms2
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« Reply #5 on: November 27, 2011, 08:37:51 PM »

Blood type is A is pretty common in Europe, so I don't think it makes one particularly susceptible to death from smallpox.
Blood type A seems to confer a resistance to Bubonic Plague, so blood type O would have seen a large decrease during that time.

I'm A-, like my mom. My dad has type O.
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NealtheRed
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« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2011, 09:50:01 PM »

Blood type is A is pretty common in Europe, so I don't think it makes one particularly susceptible to death from smallpox.
Blood type A seems to confer a resistance to Bubonic Plague, so blood type O would have seen a large decrease during that time.

I'm A-, like my mom. My dad has type O.
Interesting. My mom is blood type A as well, but how I ended up with O is beyond me. I know O is recessive too.
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saphorr
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« Reply #7 on: November 27, 2011, 10:24:13 PM »

Blood type A seems to confer a resistance to Bubonic Plague, so blood type O would have seen a large decrease during that time.
Do you have a source link on this?  My wife happens to be a geneticist researching ancient plague; she hadn't heard of this claim before and was curious to see where it came from.

From personal reading I know that in the pre-DNA era people measured all kinds of correlations between blood types and other quantities of interest, so I can definitely believe such a study has been done.  What I'm curious about is the age of the study and the strength of the correlation.
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NealtheRed
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« Reply #8 on: November 27, 2011, 10:52:00 PM »

Blood type A seems to confer a resistance to Bubonic Plague, so blood type O would have seen a large decrease during that time.
Do you have a source link on this?  My wife happens to be a geneticist researching ancient plague; she hadn't heard of this claim before and was curious to see where it came from.

From personal reading I know that in the pre-DNA era people measured all kinds of correlations between blood types and other quantities of interest, so I can definitely believe such a study has been done.  What I'm curious about is the age of the study and the strength of the correlation.

Here is an article by Scientific American that addresses the blood type-susceptibility connection: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=why-do-people-have-differ

I first learned about this in an undergraduate, anthropology course.
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A.D.
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« Reply #9 on: November 28, 2011, 11:12:31 AM »

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1131886-overview this site talks about cowpox used as a vaccine against smallpox if I've got it right cowpox infection causes ristance to smallpox.
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