About Genetic Genealogy----------------------------Connecting DNA to Traditional Genealogy

Genetic Genealogy helps you uncover your roots!       

 

 

DNA testing may be just the thing to help to break down some of those “brick walls.”   

The DNA test is simple--just a cheek swab in a kit sent to you by mail.

Testing tells you your deep ancestral heritage and migration.

Your test results will be compared with others to see if you "match". 

  Here are the simple rules of DNA testing:  

1. Only males can take a yDNA test.  A man you are testing with yDNA must be directly descended from the (male) ancestor you are interested in researching - with no females between them (yDNA cannot pass through a female ancestor). Surname projects use yDNA testing.

2. A female can find a male relative to be yDNA-tested to represent her surname family line.  This can be a father or brother, but sometimes you will have to go back up the family tree and back down to find the right male.  This male must be descended, through males only, from a common male ancestor.

3. A male who is tracing a line that comes to him through a female ancestor will use the same method of going back up the family tree and down again for find a male who descends, through males only, from a common male ancestor.

4. Both males and females can take an mtDNA test.  A person testing with mtDNA must be directly descended from the (female) ancestor you are interested in researching - with no males between the test taker and ancestor being researched (mtDNA cannot pass through a male ancestor) Though not useful in a surname project, mtDNA testing tells you your deep ancestry for your maternal line and can help you find others who share a maternal ancestor. 

5.  Both males and females can take an autosomal (Family Finder) test which tests the DNA received from both sides and is most useful for recent ancestors (6 generations or less going back). 

Frequently asked questions

about using DNA for genealogy

Why get yDNA tested?
Here are the benefits for the genealogist:

  • Confirm or eliminate relationships.
  • Focuses research to related families.
  • Directs research into a geographic area.
  • Directs research into a specific timeframe.
  • Establishes country or region of origin.
  • Confirms variant surnames are family.
  • Identifies pre-surname migration.
  • Strengthens weak paper trails.
  • Avoids pursuing false connections.