Understand Your Results and Matches - At FTDNA

 Your Personal DNA Results at Family Tree DNA
 
When you receive the email that your results are ready, you will want to go to MyFTDNA Page to see them. 
To see your results, log in at www.familytreedna.com using your kit number and the password they sent you.  (Forgotten either of these? Contact FTDNA: (713) 868-1438 or helpdesk@familytreedna.com )
 
Click on the test you took (Y-DNA, Family Finder, or mtDNA) to see the links with information about your results.  
 
 
 
 
 
Understand Your yDNA Results at FTDNA
  • Y-DNA:  Here are the links you will see if you have taken a Y-DNA test
    • Matches--
      • Choose how you want to compare and at how many markers. 
        • Begin with "The Entire Database" and the most markers you have had tested.
        • Change to lower number of markers to see if you have matches who have tested at lower number of markers.
      • Icons to the right of the name allow you to see information about the match
        • Letter--opens an email addressed to your match
        • TIP--tells you probability that you shared a common ancestor within recent generations 
        • Notes--allows you to keep track of those you contact and what you learn
        • Family Tree--if the match has provided one
        • Number of yDNA markers the person has tested and if he has taken a Family Finder test. 
    • Ancestral Origins--This page shows the countries of origin given by your matches. It's important to note both the number of matches you have for a country and how many people in the database have reported that country of origin.  (For example, if you have 6 matches from England and 3 from France, you may want to focus more on France, as the number of people from France who have been tested is so much smaller - this means that the proportion from France who match you is much higher.) 
    • Haplotree and SNPs--Your haplogroup tells you the ancient origins for your yDNA line
    • Matches Map--markers on the world map show the origins given by you and your matches.
    • MIgrations Maps--shows the migrations of your ancient ancestors.
    • SNP Map--shows the origins of specific SNPs
    • Haplogroup Origins--Shows the Haplogroup Origins for your matches.  It's important to note both the number of matches you have for a country and how many people in the database have reported that country of origin.  (For example, if you have 6 matches from England and 3 from France, you may want to focus more on France, as the number of people from France who have been tested is so much smaller - this means that the proportion from France who match you is much higher.)  This information is given to you in the Percentage column on the right. 
        • Percentages above 2% are considered significant
        • Percentages above 4% are considered highly significant.
    • Y-STR Values--You will see a string of numbers that won’t mean much if you only look at your own numbers. You will need more information to understand what you are seeing.
      • Panels.  Your yDNA test results will be shown in groupings in which the markers were tested in the lab.  Panel 1 is the first 12 markers, etc.
      • Locus--the sequence of markers that FTDNA uses to report the markers.  Each locus refers to a specific spot on the genome.
      • DYS# - the address or "name" of a particular spot on the strand of the DNA. Think of the part of the DNA strand that the lab tests as a street.    At each address there is a specific pattern that repeats over and over.  The lab looks at a specific part of the DNA strand and counts how many times a pattern repeats at each address (DYS#) on that strand.
      • Allele.  The number of times the pattern repeats is called an "Allele".  People usually just say the number of alleles they got at a particular DYS#, as in “I got a 10 at 391”.
Other links will be discussed more fully under Matches.
You can learn more about your yDNA results and your matches on the following pages:

mtDNA Test Results  
Your mtDNA results are shown relative to the Cambridge Reference Sequence (CRS). 
  • For better understanding of your mtDNA results, click on "Learn More" in the lower right corner of the box with information about your mtDNA test.
    • mtDNA Matches--You will see the name and email address of each reported match.  You can contact your matches by clicking on the email address.
    • Ancestral Origins--Shows you the countries of origins reported by those whose mtDNA test results match yours.  It's important to note both the number of matches you have for a country and how many people in the database have reported that country of origin.  (For example, if you have 6 matches from England and 3 from France, you may want to focus more on France, as the number of people from France who have been tested is so much smaller - this means that the proportion from France who match you is much higher.) Percentages above 2% are considered significant.  Percentages above 4% are considered highly significant.
    • Haplogroup Origins--Tells you the range of places in which relatives of your ancestors may have lived. 
      It's important to note both the number of matches you have for a country and how many people in the database have reported that country of origin.  (For example, if you have 6 matches from England and 3 from France, you may want to focus more on France, as the number of people from France who have been tested is so much smaller - this means that the proportion from France who match you is much higher.)  This information is given to you in the Percentage column on the right. Percentages above 2% are considered significant. Percentages above 4% are considered highly significant.
    • Matches Map--markers on the world map show the origins given by you and your matches.
    • Migrations Maps--shows the migrations of your ancient ancestors.
    • For more information:  Understanding mtDNA
    • FTDNA has some good information on how they present your mtDNA results and how to evaluate your matches:

Family Finder Results
The Family Finder test works by comparing your autosomal DNA to that of other people in our database who have taken the test. The program calculates your relationship with a match based on sharing linked segments of DNA. Any two people from the same population may share some DNA. However, as matching segments of DNA become longer and as you share more segments, it is unlikely to be a chance match. The sharing is due to a recent common ancestor.